回复:想象一下

一个特殊的博客系列,包括来自加拿大(及以后者!)的作家和创造商,故事突出显示和庆祝文化日2021主题,Re:Imagine。

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 12:49:43","first_published_at":"2021-06-17 10:05:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-17 09:44:04","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:27","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":69}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

运动中的艺术

Aaron Rothermund为文化日

2021年6月29日

I was taking care of my neighbours instead of the audience, and I was looking out for their budget instead of their evening of entertainment. But, it felt good. I told myself that like doing a show, any day where I promptly answered our property manager\u2019s emails was a good day.\n\nThe Board was a start, but it hardly covered the time I normally spent working on my in-town shows, let alone being on the road. I still faced a lot of days where I couldn't conceive of a reason to exist in the world. I also needed to replace the money I wasn't getting from performing.\n\nSo, I started selling Pok\u00e9mon.\n\nThanks to news-worthy current events such as COVID-19 and civil unrest, you probably missed the story about Pok\u00e9mon cards. I heard, by fluke, how the trend of \u201cripping\u201d (opening) packs on one's Livestream was sending the value of particular sets parabolic. I won't bore you with (or reveal) the details of how I identified a bulk, legal, supply of those sets, but I will tell you that I knew if I sold at market value I stood to double my money. However, it could take up to $10,000 to corner the market\u2014a market some might argue was roughly as solid as dogecoin.\n\nI shrugged and said, \u201cYou gotta catch 'em all.\u201d\n\nIt was a gamble, but with demand outpacing supply, all it took was some Kijiji and Facebook Marketplace ads to become the Walter White of Pok\u00e9mon in my city. In a time when collectors struggled to find 5-packs at retail, I'd show up to sales with Ziploc baggies filled with hundreds of cards at reasonable prices. Their eyes bulged, as if I actually held pocket monsters with elemental powers in my hands. By my third week selling I met a customer who already knew me by reputation.\n\n\u201cYou sold to Tony's crew didn't you?\u201d he said, his eyes locked onto the $500 of product I was unloading onto his centre console. \u201cI knew it, man... because when I saw those Ziploc baggies... I thought, 'this is the guy'...\u201d I'd become Heisenberg, the man with the Blue Ziplocs.\n\nIt took work; negotiating and selling the packs, sometimes $20 at a time, sometimes $2,500. It took three months of hustling only to reach break-even. I didn't mind. To quote Bryan Cranston's character: I liked it. I was good at it. Ringing the bell at the Pok\u00e9mon-sales office felt almost as good as doing a set. Ok, it didn't feel nearly as \u201cgood\u201d, but it did feel as \u201cpurposeful\u201d. The hustle to find enough stage time is the same that got me out of bed at 6:00 am to drive across the city to close a huge sale (I learned quickly that you meet when the customer wants to, otherwise they might come to their senses).\n\nPre-COVID, I ran a regular show at the same address since April 2010. I'm the second longest-running stand-up show and host in Canada (the first being Calgary's Comedy Mondays started by legendary James Moore). In 2018, I started bringing in headliners to do the room and expanded from Thursday nights to weekend shows.\n\nIt was something I took on spontaneously, but it started me on a path. Most comics hate producing or are bad at it (often both). I knew I'd rather run my own show, the way I thought it should be run, than wait around for someone to offer me stage time at a strip club at 5:00 pm (actually not the worst gig I did early on). I'd show up early every week to set up the room which was normally configured for music; moving 52 chairs, 12 tables, lighting candles and setting the lights to get the right ambience. I'd give my all to warming up the crowd at the start of every show, and after acts sometimes bombed. The comedy gods rewarded me with full audiences that appreciated the comedy club feel.\n\nThanks to producing my own show, I was very privileged to have an outlet where I could always invest my time and feel like I had a purpose. The downside of getting to focus only on comedy for the last decade is I only ever focused on comedy.\n\nBetween March 2020 and March 2021, I realized I don't have a purpose; one thing I'm meant to do. I choose a new purpose every day\u2014a goal or action I\u2019m going to make happen through deliberate, purposeful effort. Ideally that purpose is getting in front of crowds, but it doesn't have to be. I'm a great Board member. I like making things happen and looking out for the interest of the group. And, I like finding an angle and hustling as I did with the Pok\u00e9mon. \n\n![Green performing stand-up on stage. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/repurpose\/mike-chucks2-1_qaROg4.jpg)\n\nWhen I get back to stand-up, I don't expect to stop doing either of those things. I see the opportunity to bring all these skills together: I want to run stand-up classes and workshops on how to produce shows so I can help new comics in my city the same way I took on responsibility and cared for everyone in my building. \n\nThe Pok\u00e9mon hustle showed me what happens when I fully commit, and made me think about the way I was approaching comedy. I was often going half way; bringing in a headliner for 2 nights of shows instead of 5, or occasionally posting short clips instead of consistently producing regular online content. If I can bet on myself the same way I did when I cornered the market I'll be excited to see how my stand-up evolves (ideally from a Charmeleon to a Charizard).\n\nIf you're an artist who feels like you lost your identity because COVID-19 took away your ability to perform as you normally would, look at it as an opportunity to reimagine your craft and engage with your audience\u2014perhaps even a new crowd or community\u2014in a different way. You don't need to _serve one purpose_, but rather use everything you\u2019ve got and everything you do to _create on purpose_.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:37:48","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 14:11:31","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 14:01:11","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:03","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":"2021-07-26 13:25:12","is_featured":true,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":74}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

回复:目的

迈克绿色文化日

2021年6月29日

In terms of race and representation, opera has a long way to go still. Opera InReach mentors and featured performers are diverse, meaning students are sure to see themselves on stage.\n\nAlong with physical accessibility via digital delivery, the materials relate opera to the world students know, including social justice and other relevant themes, and forms like spoken word. Opera and social issues are not strangers. Beethoven's Fidelio tells the story of a woman who disguises herself as a jail guard to rescue her husband from incarceration in a political prison. Pepper, who was a pop singer before taking on opera, points out differences between pop and opera singing techniques. \n\nYet, pointing out the connections brings opera closer to home. \u201cThey\u2019re already experienced in \u2018opera\u2019 even if they don\u2019t know it,\u201d says Perri Lo, Provincial Coordinator for British Columbia.\n\n\u201cFor students, they don\u2019t quibble about what is opera or not,\u201d Fajardo adds.\n\nAnother important aspect is future audience building. \u201cThat was a big part of our considerations,\u201d Agostino says.\n\n![Libydo and Kayla Ruiz. Photo courtesy of Opera InReach.](assets\/National\/blog\/opera-inreach\/1-libydokaylaruiz-1_w39az4.png)\n \n**The Details**\n\nAfter offering pilot presentations at a mix of middle and high schools, and the University of Toronto (where both Adridge and Pepper studied), the teams are busy preparing modules to present to school boards at the coming of the academic year in September 2021. The material will be flexible.\n\n\u201cIt\u2019s being aware, being sensitive to their curriculum,\u201d Lo says. \u201cIt\u2019s so different between provinces.\u201d\n\n\u201cWe\u2019re trying to find as many different ways of approaching it,\u201d says Elliott Harder, Provincial Coordinator for Alberta. That can also include other disciplines such as literature, science (looking at the physics of sound, for example,) and theatre. \u201cIt\u2019s not just music,\u201d he says. \u201cWe keep finding more avenues to do that.\u201d\n\nThe presentations last between 7 and 20 minutes, with some examples, and wrap up in activity, typically with on-site mentors to provide support. Future plans include one-on-one mentorships for any students who want to pursue any aspect of opera from singing to stage management.\n\nAs Kehler points out, it\u2019s not only about arts and culture \u2013 but to educate students on realistic future employment opportunities. \u201cHow can we work in the opera industry, but maybe not on the opera stage?\u201d \n\nFeedback from the pilot programmes has been very positive, with many students enthusiastic about the opportunity to discover something they never would have gotten to otherwise. \u201cWe were so pleasantly surprised by the response,\u201d Agostino says. \n\nIn the end, opera is a glorious art form with a bad rep. \u201cOpera has a big job to undo that perception,\u201d Adridge says. \u201cIt\u2019s opera\u2019s job to do that.\u201d\n\nPutting opera in reach of everyone sets up the art form in its rightful place. \u201cArt as a pillar of society,\u201d Adridge says. \u201c\\[It\u2019s] the ultimate vessel of creativity.\u201d\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:54","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 12:15:48","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 11:50:05","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:50","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":72}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

重新校准:看Opera Ineach

Anya Wassenberg培养日

2021年6月29日

Instagram\u2019s real strength is its ubiquity. The platform evaded the frustrating pandemic cycle of closing, reopening, and closing again: it was just always there. And, while that pandemic cycle ran on a loop, communities were formed and solidified on this social network by sharing artworks, information, thoughts, and opinions as the art world changed around us.\n\nOver the past year, as pandemic measures forced galleries and other physical arts and culture venues to close, internet connectivity surged and Instagram became the predominant photo-sharing platform for many emerging artists. Stuck at home throughout provincial lockdowns and curfews, many of us swiped down to refresh our IG time-line multiple times a day\u2026maybe more than we\u2019d like to admit. There\u2019s no doubt that the smartphone-based platform flattens and simplifies both the actual artworks and the conversations around them; however, in the pandemic context it became an invaluable starting point to strengthen our community connections and define our intentions as artists or organizations going forward.\n\nAt times, the move online was a reluctant one. An Instagram post cannot compare to a physical art exhibition\u2014as any painter will be quick to tell you, it looks much better in person. An online interaction does not equate to a real-world social exchange, nor can we rely on the app to be the only community network, or even a truly democratic one. What\u2019s most interesting is how Instagram developed parallel to art spaces and institutions as a public system of connectivity and support between creatives. \n\nInstagram\u2019s real strength is its ubiquity. The platform evaded the frustrating pandemic cycle of closing, reopening, and closing again: it was just always there. And, while that pandemic cycle ran on a loop, communities were formed and solidified on this social network by sharing artworks, information, thoughts, and opinions as the art world changed around us. Throughout this past year, the platform was redefined as a site for alternate modes of sharing and selling contemporary art, through digital art spaces built by the community for the community.\n\n![Artwork featured on Peinture Contemporaine Que\u0301bec\u2019s Instagram feed. From left to right, works by: Robert Chayer, Chloe Gallagher-Smylie, Luca Fortin. Screenshot, June 2020. Photo courtesy of the author. ](assets\/National\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram\/peinturecontemporaine-quebec-feed-view_GxK30C.jpg)\n\nThis engagement on Instagram actively refreshed our systems of disseminating contemporary art. The platform facilitated the development of a community-led annex of emerging artists and events; when galleries and art institutions closed, curated accounts emerged to show work on a local and global scale. Over the course of an ex-tended lockdown in Qu\u00e9bec, new accounts like [@mtlpainters](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/mtlpainters\/?hl=en) and [@peinturecontemporaine_quebec](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/peinturecontemporaine_quebec\/?hl=en) gained traction with a mandate to keep our community strong. In Ontario, [@curatedtoronotart](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/curatedtorontoart\/?hl=en) has asserted itself as an online gallery space featuring works from Toronto-based artists. Existing on a free, accessible platform meant users could build networks easily, effectively forming a digital archive of emerging artists and works produced over the last year.\n\nInstagram-based projects also regenerated systems of marketing and selling artworks using online auctions or flash sales. [\u201cLes Encans de la Quarantaine\u201d](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/lesencansdelaquarantaine\/?hl=en), an initiative auctioning off local artworks on Instagram and Facebook, was founded during Montr\u00e9al\u2019s lockdown to support artists amidst uncertainty and anxiety. The team behind the project identified the spike in online media consumption during the early days of the pandemic and the sense of solidarity forming between artists on social media platforms, explaining that \u201cthe audience was there for it, waiting for anything to happen online.\u201d This year the project successfully helped over 300 artists sell works and the team recently received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts\u2019 Digital Strategy Fund to create an independent web platform, solidifying their position as a resource for independent and unrepresented artists in Canada.\n\nInstagram can also be a place to build and shape the identity of existing galleries and institutions, or call to restructure them. Throughout the pandemic, we witnessed power shifts within major Canadian cultural institutions\u2014labour disputes at the MAC, the controversy surrounding the firing of MMFA Director Nathalie Bondil, allegations of discrimination at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights\u2014which reflect a current heightened awareness of social and racial justice issues. In this context as well, Instagram prevailed as an accessible resource for the arts community, as accounts like [@artsaccountability](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/artsaccountability\/?hl=en) shared information surrounding current events. In this way, Instagram was used as a tool to amplify voices calling out racism and injustices in the art world.\n\n![Mohamemed Musallam's artwork as seen on the Les Encans de la quarantine website. Screenshot, June 2020. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram\/encan-n_mrsygl.jpg)\n\nThis opened a space for institutions to reinstate their intentions on Instagram, already a platform for identity building. Artist-run centre Articule posted an [open letter](https:\/\/www.articule.org\/en\/open-letter-to-artist-centres-moving-beyond-solidarity-statements) to their contemporaries in Qu\u00e9bec, calling to move beyond statements of solidarity against systemic oppression online by aiming to integrate concrete changes into their programming. As they wrote, \u201cit is not adequate to post once a year on Instagram as proof of progressive politics or to rewrite an About section to include a mention of diversity\u2026We must commit to radical, tangible, long-term, proactive support for Black and Indigenous artists, members, curators, and publics.\u201d Moves like this one effectively used Instagram as an information-sharing tool and a starting point for progressive dialogue, while recognizing the performative quality of activism that is solely based online.\n\nInstagram has always been a place for discourse; users assert their opinions on everything from celebrity gossip to current events, but discussions on Instagram\u2014like the pictures, lifestyle blogs, and advertisements on the app\u2014can be misleading and do not show all angles. The photo-based format is simply not made for open dialogue, the algorithm prioritizes certain voices, and the app itself has been accused of deleting political posts. Recently, multiple Instagram members found their stories and posts on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) were removed from their social media on Red Dress Day, a day meant to raise awareness of the issue. Instagram promptly took to Twitter to assert that it was \u201ca global technical issue not related to any topic\u201d and was met with skepticism and mistrust. This series of events was immediately circulated in new posts and stories, encouraging users to research and raise awareness offline as well. While the app\u2019s ability to instantly transmit information is valuable, it functions best as a means of connection and point of departure for conversations, mobilization, and social change that happens beyond Instagram. \n\nBoth political movements and artistic ones are primarily, and indispensably, situated in real life; the two-dimensional aspect of viewing artworks on Instagram also applies to the dialogue around them. However, in the absence of public spaces over the last year, the digital sphere was reinforced as a tool for connecting, networking, and spreading information. Instagram has allowed us to reimagine systems of sharing and selling artworks, methods of community-building, and the hierarchies in place in the art world and beyond. As we all move towards a post-pandemic reality, it\u2019s clear that the ubiquity of Instagram and its new role as a resource for social equity will hold us accountable in creating inclusive and informed communities both on and offline.\n\n_Cover image: Artwork featured on Mtl Painters' Instagram feed. From left to right, paintings by: Francisco De La Barra, Catherine H\u00e9lie-Harvey, Petro Psillos, Marie-Chlo\u00e9 Duval, Chlo\u00e9 Gagnon, Eva Morrison. Screenshot, June 2021. Photo courtesy of the author._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-15 09:23:23","first_published_at":"2021-06-23 12:09:37","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-23 11:52:35","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:42:29","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":75}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

刷新:如何在Instagram重新定义艺术社区的一年

eva莫里森文化日

7月15日,2021年

As a Relaxed Performance Consultant, I help arts organizations to welcome members of the Disability Community to performances and spaces. And yes, a lot of the organizations I consult for are larger companies whose donors may have deeper pockets, but the people I work with aren\u2019t just ticking boxes - they want to make a real change in the arts scene in Canada. They want to re-imagine how to invite the Disability Community to participate in their work. \n\nI am often approached by smaller companies or individual artists asking how to make their work more inclusive, and honestly, small steps can be taken to begin that process. Steps that don\u2019t cost a lot, if anything at all. Erin told me that the Kingston Arts Council is \u201c\u2026making an effort to describe their photos (on social media)\u201d and, she shares, people are describing themselves in meetings. I agree. I\u2019ve noticed this myself over the last year. Prior to COVID the only meetings I attended where people gave visual descriptions of themselves (for members of the Blind and Low Vision communities) were those that were disability led. Now, it\u2019s more common\u2014at least in the arts. Emily Maxwell, Founder & Co-Director of Toronto\u2019s [The Disability Collective](https:\/\/www.thedisabilitycollective.com\/), echoes these thoughts. \u201cIt can sound like a lot and daunting, but small steps can be made until it becomes natural\u201d.\n\nIt\u2019s true, and something I always tell the people I work with. Start small, do what you can, but at the same time be honest with your community about what you are able to offer as well as what you aren\u2019t. So if you can keep the house lights at 30% and lower sound cues to 90 decibels, but can\u2019t afford an ASL\/LSQ interpreter or Audio Description, tell your audiences. Manage their expectations so that they know exactly what they can access and what they can\u2019t. Give them all the information they need prior to purchasing a ticket so that they can fully engage and participate, or know that your limitations won\u2019t allow that at this time.\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts\/f18a463c-2ef7-4e82-91ed-b29c8efcb091-original-min_ie6858.jpg)\nImage Description: Emily and Nathan are standing in a green field surrounded by grass and trees. They are leaning forward against a chain link fence and looking over the fence towards the left of the photo. Emily, a young white woman with red hair and blue eyes, is standing on the left of the photo with her arms on top of the fence. Nathan, a young white man with brown hair and blue eyes, is standing on the right of the photo with his left arm on top of the fence. They are both wearing blue denim jackets. Both have thoughtful expressions on their faces.\n\nDoes inclusion and accessibility stop at front of house? It shouldn\u2019t. What are we doing to \u201cshowcase human beings in all of their diverse beauty\u201d\u2014 a gorgeous thought by Nathan Sartore, Co-Director of The Disability Collective, a new company out of Toronto that promotes and showcases art by Disabled Artists. Art should \u201clook like what people look like\u201d, Nathan expands. \u201cAnd real people backstage too,\u201d Emily adds. Yes! As a former Stage Manager with on-again off-again mobility issues, I completely agree. How often have I arrived at a venue to find the booth inaccessible? More times than I\u2019d like to admit. And what about stage steps? How do artists who use mobility devices access a stage that doesn\u2019t have an elevator or ramp? Laura Cusack, Founder and Executive Director of the [Hummingbird Hub](https:\/\/www.hummingbirdhub.org\/) in downtown, historical Stouffville, found a way. \u201cCulture is the heart of a community. To get a community to bond, and make an impact as we grow we need to focus on the cultural arts\u201d. And that focus is brought about by their Accessible Open Mic Night. Most open mics, as we know, take place in pubs and bars that usually have stairs or aren\u2019t very inclusive. So how did a community centre in a century-old building become the centre for inclusivity in Stouffville? By engaging with their audience and community\u2014a thought echoed by each of the people I spoke with.\n\n> Ask your community what they need in order to participate. Engage in dialogue with the Disability Community and listen, without preconceived ideas, but with an open heart and mind, and a desire to breakdown barriers and include everyone. \n\n[Cassie-Hope Aubin](https:\/\/www.cassiehopeaubin.com\/), Deaf Theatre Artist, shares \u201cWe see diversity happening, which is amazing, but disability is often excluded or the at the bottom of the list.\u201d As a musical theatre performer Cassie-Hope has \u201cbeen in shows that weren\u2019t accessible, so I wouldn\u2019t have even been able to see my own show.\u201d\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts\/page-3-image-3_fvRC7l.png)\nImage Description: Taylor, a singer-songwriter in a wheelchair, wears a white t-shirt and performs at the Hummingbird Hub\u2019s Accessible Open Mic Night. A microphone on a black stand is in front of Taylor. His father, Mike, is on the right of the photo holding a guitar and wearing a green and white baseball-style shirt. A green and gold sign with \u201cHummingbird Hub\u201d and the web address is on a white wall behind them.\n\nIt\u2019s time for a change. Time to reimagine how we present, access, and create art. It\u2019s time to relax not only performances, but also processes. Reach out to the d\/Deaf and Disability communities, ask what they need to be included both onstage and off, engage disabled creatives, bring their voices to the stage and share their stories in open and honest ways. This is an exciting time of reflection. We are being allowed time to think about how we want to move forward\u2014and it\u2019s time to include every voice in that discussion.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:13","first_published_at":"2021-06-23 11:06:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 13:19:19","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:28","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":73}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

reimagine-残疾社区如何访问艺术

文化日的rachel标志

2021年6月29日

...there is a strong desire for retroactively introducing more public spaces, fighting against the car-centric culture and creating more accessible spaces that can foster public life.\n\nThe City of Portland was not supportive at first. The Bureau of Buildings wanted to tear down the teahouse structure and rejected planning applications to turn the street intersection into a city square. However, the invigorated neighbours took matters into their own hands. Together with their children, they turned the intersection into a colourful plaza, setting up a library in a phone booth, a message board, a kid\u2019s playhouse, a corner for produce-sharing and a kiosk with a Thermos flask always full of tea.\n\n![Google Street View of the Share-It-Square intersection. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces\/streetview-2-1_BFGSFz.png)\n\nEventually, the City of Portland was convinced and granted conditional permit for these activities. \u201cThe neighbourhood had a design problem, not a human resources problem\u201d explains Charles Montgomery, a Canadian urban planner, in his 2015 book [Happy City](https:\/\/thehappycity.com\/the-book\/). The new plaza quickly resulted in a much-improved community spirit, new friendships, and torn down fences between yards. Annual events and a tradition of sharing tools and food has led to the square\u2019s name, the Share-It-Square. \n\nThis Square has been transforming Sellwood since the late 1990s. Every year, a new painting adorns the intersection. Neighbours maintain the many structures around the square and, most importantly, foster the new-found spirit of a functioning village. Inspired by the idea of a sharing economy, Mark and his team started the non-profit [City Repair](https:\/\/cityrepair.org\/share-it-square) that provides resources and support to similar projects. More than 100 new public spaces have since been created in Portland alone, and much more than 1,000 imitations all across the United States have been inspired by the Share-It-Square as well. Annually, City Repair\u2019s flagship event, the [Village Building Convergence](https:\/\/villagebuildingconvergence.com\/), takes place in order to inspire placemaking and community engagement all over the world. \n\n**What makes the Share-It-Square a Great Place?**\n\nShare-It-Square can look back at more than two decades of success\u2014but, what makes this a great public space? The [Project for Public Spaces](https:\/\/www.pps.org\/) (PPS), a non-profit from New York City, is an authoritative voice in judging the quality of public spaces. The organisation has established the following criteria for a good or great public space:\n\n![What Makes a Great Place? diagram courtesy of PPS.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces\/place-diagram-pps-1_aCVwfs.png)\n\nThe Share-It-Square is located in the heart of Sellwood, but not too far from a main street. This makes it accessible and well-linked, providing a \u201cfocus for community identity and gathering\u201d, as evaluated by the PPS. Comfort and image are evidenced in the long life of the square, the loving maintenance from neighbours and the always-available tea. A survey by City Repair showed that over 85% of neighbours felt a decrease in crime, a slowing of traffic, and an improvement in communication between neighbours. The Square also meets criteria such as diverse uses, activities throughout the year including neighbourhood celebrations, and increased sociability.\n\nBased on this success, the City of Portland adapted a new ordinance allowing for street intersections to be transformed into similar public spaces if 80% of neighbours within two blocks sign statements approving the plan. This has led to many similar projects in the city, such as the popular Sunnyside Piazza. \n\n**How to Reimagine Public Space in Canadian Cities**\n\nCOVID-19 has focused urban planners\u2019 attention on the importance of public spaces and community cohesion. Reimagining public spaces is an important part of this discourse. Places such as the Share-It-Square can increase residents\u2019 happiness and health. They provide important open-air meeting spaces that can prevent social isolation and make mutual support easier to organise. \n\nCanadian cities have recognised the importance of reimagining public spaces, also looking towards the 15-minute-city trend. In Montr\u00e9al, organisations such as [Active Neighbourhoods](https:\/\/participatoryplanning.ca\/active-neighbourhoods-canada) and the [Montr\u00e9al Urban Ecology Centre](https:\/\/urbanecologycenter.org\/) work to get citizens involved in the planning and nurturing of public spaces. In Toronto, there are initiatives for Indigenous placemaking that focus on designing and managing public space through a people-centred lens. And, in Vancouver, an event called \u201cReimagining City Streets and the Public Realm: Towards a Green and Connected City\u201d took place in March 2021, organised by the City and Simon Fraser University. Participants criticised that too much of city place (30% in the case of Vancouver) is dedicated to streets. Only 11% of Vancouver\u2019s city area is dedicated to parks. These examples show that throughout Canada, there is a strong desire for retroactively introducing more public spaces, fighting against the car-centric culture and creating more accessible spaces that can foster public life. \n\nSo, if we want to reimagine public spaces, we should learn from our neighbours and our traditions. And Mark Lakeman, together with his organisation, is a particularly good neighbour, sharing resources and inspiring everyone to imagine new public spaces even in unexpected corners. His message to Canadian readers? Find your creative capacity and fight loneliness in cities by turning spaces into places. \n\n**Sources**\n\n\u201cHappy City\u201d, Charles Montgomery 2015, pp. 354 \nInterview with Mark Lakeman from May 19th, 2021 \n[https:\/\/www.restreets.org\/case-studies\/share-it-square-sunnyside-piazza](https:\/\/www.restreets.org\/case-studies\/share-it-square-sunnyside-piazza) \n[https:\/\/medium.com\/@lauravonputtkamer\/reimagining-public-spaces-adapting-to-a-new-reality-9491959e9b7](https:\/\/medium.com\/@lauravonputtkamer\/reimagining-public-spaces-adapting-to-a-new-reality-9491959e9b7) [https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=mQosMm_foYM&ab_channel=ThePolishAmbassador](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=mQosMm_foYM&ab_channel=ThePolishAmbassador) \n[https:\/\/cityrepair.org\/share-it-square](https:\/\/cityrepair.org\/share-it-square) \n[https:\/\/www.pps.org\/places\/share-it-square](https:\/\/www.pps.org\/places\/share-it-square) \n[https:\/\/www.toposmagazine.com\/portlands-share-square\/](https:\/\/www.toposmagazine.com\/portlands-share-square\/)\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-13 09:26:57","first_published_at":"2021-06-17 13:41:49","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-17 13:28:09","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:57","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":70}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

恢复公共空间:俄勒冈州波特兰的分享IT-正方形

Laura Puttkamer为文化日

7月13日,2021年

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund.\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-14 11:45:17","first_published_at":"2021-06-14 11:37:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-14 11:28:11","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:38:57","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":68}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

道路较少旅行:三位艺术家重新想象成功和职业生涯

Linh S.nguyễn文化日

2021年6月14日

My process of reimagining theatre began with writing letters about these issues. I will never forget the private disclosures regarding systemic racism shared with me in this process: dozens of artists reached out to share, but were afraid to speak publicly. I felt a tremendous sense of responsibility to make my theatre community a better place. \n\nAn old theatre adage states that one must leave town before they are valued in their home community. I imagine a time where that is not the case. \n\n![Shot of Hannah Moscovitch's \"The Kaufman Kabaret\". Set design by Hannah Matiachuk. 2016. University of Alberta.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-theatre\/img-0987_O7cFMB.jpg){.pull}\n\nCOVID-19 dealt the theatre community a severe blow, but it also gave our community a crucial opportunity. Many have wondered, why now? Why bring a conversation on racial equity and equality now when the industry is struggling? Power structures are intimidating; we are often silent (or silenced) in their presence. It\u2019s much simpler to share stories and express disagreement when there is no work to be gained or lost. \n\nBut the deeper dynamics of gatekeeping aren\u2019t affected by a pandemic. There is power in wielding money and contracts, so it quickly becomes safer to remain passive. If those who have the financial means to sustain you are at odds with those challenging the status quo, where do we place our support? To whom do we have a responsibility? \n\n**Imagine\u2026 a healthy workplace.** \n\nEarly in my career, I elevated all my relationships to the status of family or close friends, to the detriment of my self-advocacy. It\u2019s not that deeper relationships aren\u2019t welcome, but we can forget that we are each other\u2019s co-workers. As professional colleagues, we need to uphold standards of employment that reflect the industry we want. \n\n\u201c\u2026employers have an obligation to create an inclusive workplace. This includes removing discriminatory barriers that prevent individuals from getting a job or promotion; accommodating employees who have special needs; and ensuring that the work environment is free from discrimination.\u201d (Alberta Human Rights Act) \n\nI\u2019m reimagining professional industry where meaningful engagement with marginalized communities results in fewer barriers. When barriers go unchallenged because challengers risk losing their livelihoods, the industry suffers as much as the individual. The theatre industry suffers a lack of credibility when it fights positive change. \n\nAnyone can forget their responsibility and connection to a community, including marginalized artists. We are all flawed and capable of oppressing each other in this competitive environment. How do we open the doors to alleviate some of that competition? \n\nCan theatre companies who receive local, provincial, and federal public arts funding cast a wider net to find their talent? Open calls for auditions are not always so open; every community has examples of companies that hold auditions yet continually hire the same people. Leadership positions often draw from a similar pool of insiders, without much effort to consider new voices. Accessing a path to influential positions is nearly impossible for many multi-talented artists. \n\n**Imagine\u2026 taking chances on people.** \n\nI\u2019m reimagining a theatre community where our latent talents get a chance to blossom, where we look to the margins of ourselves and our community: actors can be dramaturges; designers can be producers. We can be fluid as theatre artists. We must allow for horizontal and vertical growth. An artist should be able to broaden their horizons as well as deepen their practice. Artists yearn to stretch. When we put ourselves or others in boxes, we kill the little opportunity for surprising new directions. We revert to the way something has always been done instead of fostering a spirit of pathfinding. \n\n![Napole\u00e3o at her directorial debut for The Lobbyists collective featured at the Chinook Series, for a piece called \"Threshold\". 2021. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-theatre\/screen-shot-2021-06-16-at-11_HJckE2.png)\n\nI\u2019m reimagining my artistic voice. I\u2019ve been moving towards directing, dramaturgy, advocacy and writing. As I challenge myself, I feed my creativity, which makes me a better artist, which enhances my ability to be of use, and the cycle continues. With a broader range of abilities, I have more to offer my colleagues, who reciprocate because they are on their own paths. Fostering meaningful growth in individuals can exponentially grow their ability to give back to a community. \n\nI\u2019m reimagining artistry on my terms. It\u2019s taken me years to unpack how I\u2019ve been conditioned away from the natural wonder, creativity, and curiosity that drives art. In expanding beyond my usual practice, I am finding my path. \n\nThis path necessitates supporting others along the way. As long as we have a shared space where we can meet and co-create, I think we will be ok. I will meet you there.\n\n*Cover image of Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\u2014photo credit: Brianne Jang (BB Photography) & April M. Killins*\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 12:47:57","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 11:16:57","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 10:56:37","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:10","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":71}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

恢复社区和剧院的工作场所

Natércia拿破仑文化日

2021年6月29日

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-13 09:06:59","first_published_at":"2021-07-12 16:14:42","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-12 16:00:19","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:42","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":76}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

Helm Studios将营利性音乐模型翻转到Empower艺术家

Aly laube文化日

7月13日,2021年

A lot of the time, you're asked to simplify things and make your vision fit into something that settler or white audiences could understand better. And we didn't try to do that.\n\nAccording to Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, Curator of Inuit Art for the Government of Nunavut\u2019s Department of Culture and Heritage, who is one of _INUA\u2019s_ four co-curators, this show reimagines the exhibition of Inuit art in many ways. Most important, she says, \u201cWe're all Inuit, and it was all Inuit at every level of the project. Our project manager at the WAG is an Inuk, our exhibition designer is an Inuk, our catalog designer is an Inuk.\u201d\n\n![_INUA_ Curatorial Team. From L-R: Kablusiak, Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, asinnajaq, Dr. Heather Igloliorte. Photo courtesy of WAG.](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/inua-curatorial-team_dnyDh4.jpg)\n\n_INUA\u2019s_ lead curator, Dr. Heather Igloliorte, who\u2019s originally from Nunatsiavut (Labrador), is Assistant Professor and University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement at Montreal\u2019s Concordia University. The other _INUA_ co-curators are Kablusiak, a Calgary-based multi-disciplinary Inuk artist who was born in Yellowknife, and asinnajaq, an urban Inuk artist and curator from Inukjuak, Nunavik, who grew up in Montr\u00e9al.\n\nTo select works for _INUA_, an acronym for Inuit Nunangat Ungammuaktut Atautikkut, meaning \u201clife force\u201d or \u201cInuit moving forward together,\u201d the curators reviewed pieces from the WAG\u2019s permanent collection and the Government of Nunavut\u2019s holdings. They worked with WAG staff to secure loans of artworks from artists and museums elsewhere. They also commissioned about 15 new works in a variety of media directly from Inuit artists.\n\n**Expanding the Perceptions of Inuit Art**\n\nWorking with an all-Inuit team empowered the curators to centre Inuit perspectives, asinnajaq says. \u201cA lot of the time, you're asked to simplify things and make your vision fit into something that settler or white audiences could understand better. And we didn't try to do that.\u201d\n\n\u201cIf you always simplify things,\u201d she continues, \u201caren't you feeding into making a stereotype?\u201d\n\nWhen people describe Inuit art, explains Zawadski, \u201cthey might say, \u2018Oh, it's prints and drawings from Cape Dorset. Or it's dancing bear carvings.\u2019 But Inuit art is much more than that.\u201d\n\n![Krista Ulujuk Zawadski. Photo courtesy of WAG](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/krista-ulujuk-zawadski_p1EUQ2.jpg){.small}\n\n\u201cWe tried to represent Inuit art in all forms,\u201d she says. \u201cThat includes LGBTQ+ artists. That includes urban Inuit artists. That includes Inuit from Alaska and Greenland and Calgary. That's something that not a lot of other shows have done.\u201d\n\nJocelyn Piirainen, the WAG\u2019s Assistant Curator of Inuit Art, who worked closely with the guest curators, says that in addition to carvings, textiles, prints, and drawings, _INUA_ features video, sound, multimedia installations, and other contemporary pieces.\n\n**Connecting to the Ancestors**\n\nEach co-curator also selected a work by a family member. These \u201cancestor pieces,\u201d Zawadski says, are \u201cour way of saying, \u2018This is who I am, where I come from.\u2019 Because that's something that we do as Inuit. People always ask you, \u2018Who are your parents, who are your grandparents?\u2019 They want to know where you're coming from, whose family do you belong to.\u201d\n\nSearching the WAG\u2019s permanent collection, Zawadski found a tusk carved by her great-grandfather Victor Sammurtok. Igloliorte\u2019s ancestor piece is a beaded, caribou-hide bag that her grandmother Suzannah Igloliorte made. asinnajaq chose a pair of fur-clad dolls crafted by her great aunt Elisapee Inukpuk, while Kablusiak\u2019s grandmother Ella Nasogaluak-Brown created _Arnaq & Angun_, dolls wearing traditional dresses from Inuvialuit in the Western Arctic. \n\n**Why Winnipeg?**\n\nThe issue of whether this major centre of Inuit art should be located outside traditional Inuit lands has been a contentious one. Yet as Zawadski says, \u201cBuilding Qaumajuq doesn't stop facilities being built in Inuit homelands.\u201d\n\n![asinnajaq. Photo courtesy of WAG](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/asinnajaq_suSmm1.jpg){.pull}{.right}\n\n\u201cIt\u2019s a very good thing to have a facility like this, and there should be more facilities,\u201d asinnajaq agrees. \u201cTo me, it\u2019s not a question of there being one and where should it be on earth. The answer is more.\u201d\n\nQaumajuq is creating new ways to connect to Inuit, too, particularly urban Inuit living in Winnipeg. \u201cIt\u2019s a big deal to have a building, a very beautiful, special building, that's dedicated to you,\u201d says asinnajaq.\n\n\n\n\n\nBut for Inuit, asinnajaq points out, \u201cIt\u2019s not just our space. It\u2019s our space being hosted in Treaty One territory by all of these nations\u201d in Winnipeg, the city with the largest Indigenous population in Canada. The Qaumajuq team is working on programming to promote engagement between the Inuit, First Nations, and M\u00e9tis communities.\n\n![Visible Vault, Qaumajuq, the Inuit art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Photo by Lindsay Reid.](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/visible-vault-qaumajuq-the-inuit-art-centre-at-the-winnipeg-art-gallery_DkQyg3.jpg)\n\nAnd beyond _INUA_, Piirainen suggests, Qaumajuq is holding this massive collection of Inuit art for safekeeping. A key Qaumajuq design feature is the three-story, glass [Visible Vault](https:\/\/www.wag.ca\/art\/visible-vault\/), displaying nearly 5,000 carvings, where Piirainen says everyone \u201ccan feel they are free to come in, walk around the vault, and really see the pieces up close.\u201d\n\n![Visible Vault, Qaumajuq, the Inuit art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Photo by Lindsay Reid.](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/visible-vault-qaumajuq-the-inuit-art-centre-at-the-winnipeg-art-gallery_jSh6rP.jpg)\n\n**Reaching Audiences Beyond Winnipeg**\n\nQaumajuq opened with a series of virtual events to show off its art to audiences across Canada and beyond. \n\n[An online version of the _INUA_ exhibit](https:\/\/www.wag.ca\/inua-online\/) on the Qaumajuq website enables visitors to walk through the exhibition remotely, and the museum is offering monthly virtual programs highlighting different components of the show. Igloliorte worked with a team of Inuit students to create [_Nagvaaqtavut | What We Found_](https:\/\/www.wag.ca\/inua-online\/#artwork), a multimedia guide that shares stories about some of the _INUA_ works. The WAG\u2019s education team has been offering virtual tours to Inuit students across the north as well.\n\nBy combining these online tools with in-person visits, Zawadski concludes, _INUA_ \u201cis going to reach far more people than any other Inuit art show ever has.\u201d\n\n_Cover image: Qaumajuq, the Inuit art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Photo by Lindsay Reid._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-15 09:05:57","first_published_at":"2021-07-15 09:05:57","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-13 14:00:14","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:42:16","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":77}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

加拿大最新的Inuit艺术展览的“Inua”

Carolyn B. Heller文化日

7月15日,2021年

My perspective, however, is that if we want to produce truly innovative work post-COVID, the industry needs to learn from the rest of us\u2014those whose pandemic experiences were defined by uncertainty, CERB payments, and an unintended pause from theatre\u2019s unrelenting burnout culture.\n\nFor [Rebecca Bauer](https:\/\/rebeccabaueractor.com\/), a Montr\u00e9al-based theatre artist, the decision not to fight to \u201cstay relevant\u201d during the pandemic was an easy one.\n\n\u201cMy hunch is that a lot of Canadian theatre artists don\u2019t understand what it means to give into the process,\u201d Bauer said.\n\n![Rebecca Bauer. Photo by Jeremy Cabrera.](assets\/National\/blog\/when-less-is-more\/image5-1_OP93hG.jpg){.small.right}\n\nAs an emerging artist myself, her words resonated with me. I have been fortunate enough to dip my toes in multiple creative industries\u2014theatre, film, magazine publishing\u2014and I\u2019ve noticed that while many artistic institutions are invested in appearing socially progressive and forward-thinking, this investment stops short of tangibly improving working conditions. Many artists find themselves expected to accept unpaid labour, balance full-time rehearsal commitments with day jobs outside the field, and the pressure to prioritize commercial viability over artistic potential. None of this feels innovative\u2014or sustainable.\n\nIn all honesty, I understand how easy it can be for an artist (especially one just breaking into the theatre world) to accept these unfair conditions. After all, when the work you\u2019re doing feels so important to you, isn\u2019t it natural for the exploitation that comes with it to feel important too? Since the pandemic has started, however, some artists have noticed a shift in mentality.\n\nAccording to [Samantha Megarry](https:\/\/youngpeoplestheatre.org\/dramaschool\/front-page\/faculty\/samantha-megarry\/), a Toronto-based theatre practitioner, for many of her peers, the lockdown has spurred a period of reflection. While a pandemic could never be well-timed, the beginning of lockdown was a particular blow for Megarry, who had been back at work for just nine weeks following a year she had taken to treat a cancer diagnosis. As the pandemic continued, she watched as many artists engaged with the same questions she had been asking herself the year prior.\n\n![Bauer performs in Awake (Festival de la Bete Noire). Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bauer.](assets\/National\/blog\/when-less-is-more\/image3-1_HsZv7U.jpg)\n\n\u201cI think I went through the identity crisis that a lot of artists went through this past year, which is, who am I if not my job? What value do I have as a human if I am not doing this,\u201d Megarry said, reflecting on the period after her diagnosis. \u201cI had already learned some pretty big lessons by the time the pandemic happened.\u201d\n\nMegarry added that a lot of artists she knew continued to create in lockdown\u2014just primarily for their own fulfillment, rather than an audience or employer.\n\nUltimately, this is one of the most important things that theatre institutions should understand as the industry reopens: no one has stopped working this year. Staying alive during a pandemic is a feat that demands constant labour of all kinds. \n\n> The fact that artists have continued to create at all is a testament to our resilience, and it should be rewarded with structural industry change.\n\nIf we are truly committed to accessible, inclusive theatre, we need to include artists who cannot work within restrictive timelines such as the three-week\/three-week model. We need to re-prioritize rest, and acknowledge that in order to innovate, every artist must first have the ability to pursue a creation timeline that works for their needs.\n\n![Samantha Megarry.](assets\/National\/blog\/when-less-is-more\/image6-1_izzDwH.jpg){.small}\n\nOf course, artists cannot simply reshape these industry norms on their own. They\u2019ll need time and money, which, as Megarry noted, has not been extended to artists nearly enough during lockdown.\n\n\u201cEveryone\u2019s not in the same position. If you don\u2019t have the privilege to wait until theatre comes back, if you have a child to feed, you might have to find a new career at this point,\u201d Megarry pointed out. How else can we develop better, safer communities post-COVID? It\u2019s a loaded question, but one that needs to be answered. For Bauer, it\u2019s important enough that the next step in her creative practice is to pursue funding for professional development on the topic.\n\n\n\n\u201cI want to see \\[arts institutions] always put \\[artists\u2019] mental health and wellbeing first, even at the expense of a product,\u201d Bauer said.\n\nWhether the industry is ready to catch up by letting us slow down is something only time will tell.\n\n_Cover image: From the production The God Of Carnage. (Stendhal X; dir. Noah Drew). Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bauer._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-28 09:38:41","first_published_at":"2021-07-28 09:38:41","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-13 14:26:43","updated_at":"2021-07-28 09:48:41","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":2,"post_id":78}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

当较少的时候:剧院可以从一年中学习慢动作

梅根狩猎文化日

7月28日,2021年