意外的交叉系列

交叉路口 - 两个或多个东西融合的点 - 那就是事情变得有趣的地方!这一系列受到文化日的2020主题的启发,展示了各部门之间的创意交界和远蓬勃勃的合作。

We're introducing sports people to theatre, and theatre people to sports\u2014and then there's people like us, who are in between, who can understand both worlds and love it.\n\nOn a summer night in 2008, at the corner of Queens Quay West and Bathurst in Toronto, six figures meet to play basketball. It's a weekly tradition: every Monday night at 10 pm, they meet here and shoot hoops until the lights at the court go out. The instigator was Richard Lee, who sent an email to fellow actors with an offer of a weekly game, held on Mondays\u2014the night the theatre is dark. Now, 12 years later, the tradition lives on through an innovative stage production: [_Monday Nights_](https:\/\/6thmancollective.wordpress.com\/).\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-1-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_7ZKtvW.jpeg)\n\n_Monday Nights_ was developed as part of the [Theatre Centre Residency Program](http:\/\/theatrecentre.org\/?p=1322) and saw its world premiere in Toronto in 2014, with subsequent runs in 2015 (to coincide with Toronto hosting the Pan American Games), 2017 and 2019. Most recently, it was mounted in New Westminster, BC, as part of the 2020 [PuSh International Performing Arts Festival](https:\/\/pushfestival.ca\/).\n\n\"As you grow up, you stop playing and you do adult things. You're working, you're paying bills, you're starting a career, you're trying to find love,\" says Byron Abalos. He and the other members of the [6th Man Collective](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/pg\/6thmancollective\/posts\/?ref=page_internal)\u2014veterans of the Monday night games\u2014hoped to put that conundrum to bed by adapting their weekly tradition to the stage.\n\nWhat does a pick-up basketball game look like as a piece of theatre? Upon entering the theatre, retrofitted into a makeshift basketball court, audience members are instructed by a \"referee\" (a performer in the production who acts as a guide of sorts) to choose from among the four sports bags. Each bag represents a \"team captain,\" whose journey they'll follow through the rest of _Monday Nights_. For the first half of the show, they listen to audio on headsets about their captain's personal story, as the performers run through basketball drills to teach them the rules of the game. Each captain's story is autobiographical, based on the performers in the collective; Abalos's story reflects his and his wife's attempts to conceive a child via in-vitro fertilization, for example.\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-4-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_uygO2V.jpeg)\n\nAround half-time, audience members join performers for a game of three-on-three. The stakes are unspeakably high: \"The captain of the team with the fewest points has to do the laundry of the other captains,\" after the show, Abalos admits. The show ends with performers and audience members continuing the Monday night tradition: sinking baskets until the lights go out.\n\n\"It's a journey from individual to community,\" Abalos explains. Audience members start as individuals, before coming together as competing teams, before ultimately forming a larger group. This unification is evident in the disparate audience members who come out to experience _Monday Nights_. \"It's often people who are not sports people, who hated gym in high school, who leave saying, 'Wow, that moved me and I understand sport in a different way than I did before.'\"\n\nSimilarly, he says, the show has attracted athletes who aren't necessarily predisposed to a night at the theatre. \"We had a father who brought his son, a teenager. This was the first piece of theatre they'd ever seen. There's something about the appeal of the sports part of it that made them curious enough to come on down. We're introducing sports people to theatre, and theatre people to sports\u2014and then there's people like us, who are in between, who can understand both worlds and love it.\"\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-2-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_6mvl9d.jpeg)\n\nWhat are the commonalities between art and sport that makes the fusion so uplifting? \"Camaraderie, being in our bodies, competition, a chance to connect with each other as people,\" Abalos says. \"\\[Both art and sport] connect us to each other and help us to put ourselves in situations, to build empathy, to create community and to leave us better.\"\n\n_Monday Nights_ recently finished its West Coast dates, and life is back to normal. The sporting spirit remains high in Toronto with the Raptors as sitting NBA champs. Byron and his wife dote on their baby, now seven months old. And, 12 years later, the Monday night gang still gets together to play basketball. The only difference? \"We play on Saturday mornings\u2026 because we're all older and it works better for our schedules.\"\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-03-12 15:41:01","first_published_at":"2020-03-11 09:46:22","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-03-05 13:35:20","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:24:11","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":51}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

直到灯光出去

泰勒贝索文化日

3月12日,2020年3月12日

It was so powerful to see our stories on screen for the first time. I\u2019ve great respect for the work that they put into the world and normalized it for us.\n>> \u2014 Terril Calder, influential M\u00e9tis artist and stop motion animator based in Toronto.\n\n\n\u201c_Wapos Bay_ certainly did have a large influence on our early work and our company's evolution,\u201d says Neil Christopher, one of the co-founders of the Inuit owned, Nunavut-based studio, [Taqqut Productions](https:\/\/taqqut.com\/). \u201cWe started developing a stop motion series called _Beyond the Inuksuk_ that never got picked up. This was our first big project and it was definitely inspired by _Wapos Bay_.\u201d\n\nIn 2009, again in collaboration with APTN, the NFB produced the series, _Vistas_, a collection of 13 films created by Indigenous artists\u2014including Diane Obomsawin, of Abenaki descent, who has since become a well-known and award-winning animator on the animation festival circuit\u2014from across Canada.\n\nIn 2019, the NFB\u2019s unique apprenticeship program, [Hothouse](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/playlist\/hothouse\/)\u2014that gives emerging animators a chance to make a short film in 12 weeks\u2014offered Indigenous creators from across the country an opportunity to create their own films. Chris Grant, a young Mi\u2019kmaq artist from the Pabineau First Nation whose mother, Phyllis, made two NFB animated shorts (_Maq and the Spirit of the Woods_, 2006; _Wasteg_, 2008) [was one of those participants](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/film\/xo-rad-magical\/). \n\n\u201cIt was an experience of growth for me,\u201d says Grant. \u201cI was going through personal issues because I never lived in a cool city, had money and fun work. It was extremely important for me as an artist because it boosted my credentials I guess for more work. It made me realize I am an animator and filmmaker at heart, and always have been. It was a beautiful fractal of growth for me.\u201d\n\n![Top: Amanda Strong, Glenn Gear. Bottom: Christopher Auchter, Terril Calder.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/20200406-153321_M3WJ2j.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nSince about 2009 or 2010, Indigenous animation in Canada has also emerged outside the doors of the NFB, led by artists such as Terril Calder, Glenn Gear, Amanda Strong, Christopher Auchter and Taqqut Productions.\n\nTaqqut Productions was founded in 2011 by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher. Their animation work, sometimes co-produced with the Montreal animation studio, [e\u2192d films](https:\/\/edfilms.net\/), includes a mix of TV (_Ananna\u2019s Tent_) and short films (e.g. [_Amaqqut Nunaat: The Country of Wolves_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/129589325), 2011; _Little Folk of the Arctic_, 2015; _Giant Bear_, 2018, _What\u2019s My Superpower_, 2019) made primarily for younger audiences. \n\n\u201cThe aim,\u201d says Flaherty, \u201cwas to tell our stories using the language of the population of Nunavut. Taqqut\u2019s part is to foremost tell stories coming from Inuit with authentic Inuit content, using the Inuit language. Inuktitut is being lost at 1% a year, and if we have animated films targeting children to retain the language, there must be more made.\u201d\n\nIn recent years, the studio has branched out beyond traditional Inuit stories. \u201cOur younger authors,\u201d adds Flaherty, \u201care now leading Taqqut with their vision to create film catering to all audiences. We have created other animations not just from oral stories, but also stories from our books. Not just with animation, but also with puppets.\u201d\n\n![Still from \"Snip\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/snip-by-terril-calder_ge0NM3.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nIn the realm of independent animation, Terril Calder has been an influential force since making her first stop motion films. Most of the work mentioned above has dealt with assorted myths\/folk tales. Calder\u2019s work is raw, unstable and haunting, tackling a number of personal and difficult issues like identity ([_Choke_](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=C0LE61KLdmg), 2010, co-created with Michelle Latimer; _Canned Meat_, 2009; _Vessel_, 2013), memory, isolation, and the unspeakable horrors of residential schools (_Snip_, 2016; _Keewaydah_, 2017).\n\nA Drawing major graduate of the Fine Arts program at the University of Manitoba, Calder came to animation through Winnipeg\u2019s [Video Pool Media Arts Centre](http:\/\/www.videopool.org\/). \u201cAnimation,\u201d says Calder, \u201cheld and holds so many possibilities to tell my stories and bring a different perspective to screen to make change. It really is the sum of all of my parts. Activism, Storytelling, Art, Painting, Sewing, Photography, Compositing\u2026it completely challenges me in every way.\u201d\n\nAfter completing his MFA in sculpture\/installation at Concordia, the Newfoundland born, Glenn Gear worked at a software development company in Montreal. \u201cI became increasingly curious and inspired by traditional animation techniques. I fell in love with cardboard cutout and silhouette animation, but also looked at many other stop-motion animation processes with physical puppets. I began reading, researching, talking with other animators, and most importantly experimenting with as many techniques as I could with a small camera and basic setup. Although I didn\u2019t have a formal education in animation, my background in photography and sculpture greatly helped me. The ability to create a whole world, brought to life frame-by-frame, was addictive and pure magic. I was hooked.\u201d\n\nDrawing on his Inuit and Newfoundland ancestry, Gear\u2019s films touch upon personal and collective histories (e.g. _Resettlement_, _Kablun\u00e2t_, [_Ikuma Siku_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/68052651)), mixed with more poetic and playful stories (_Rosewood Casket_, _Ginkgo_, _Cry of the Loup-garou_) all with nature often in a central role. \n\n![Still from \"Kablun\u00e2t\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/kablunat-2_c8Gow0.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nChristopher Auchter grew up on the islands of Haida Gwaii, an archipelago off the Northern Pacific coast of Canada. He studied media at Vancouver\u2019s Emily Carr University of Art and Design and later graduated from Sheridan College\u2019s computer animation program. Auchter has worked in book illustration, animated for various TV series and video games, and has directed live action (_Now is the Time_, 2020) and animation shorts (notably the beautiful and award winning [_The Mountain of SGaana_](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/film\/mountain_of_sgaana\/), 2017, which told an old Haida fable).\n\nMichif artist Amanda Strong, whose animated shorts include the imaginative, haunting explorations of personal and collective ancestry, [_Four Faces of the Moon_](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=rWe--sysNkk), 2016 and _Biidaaban_, 2017) came to stop motion animation through Photo and Illustration studies at Sheridan College. \u201cIt gave me a basis to explore moving-image while using these tools to create worlds and make stories move. Stop motion really is a series of photos that sequenced together create a magical experience of movement that can\u2019t be replicated by software. It is beautiful to see that first shot move after years of making all the pieces and it sure is beautiful when the sonic and visual pieces unite. It\u2019s a powerful tool to tell stories.\u201d\n\n![Still from \"The Mountain of SGaana\", 2017.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/the-mountain-of-sgaana-001_BYca3y.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nThere are a variety of reasons for this recent rise in Indigenous-created animation films, some of which overlap with the general rise in animation production. Advancements in technology have made animation a more accessible and affordable process for many. There was a time when animators were taking anywhere from 2 to 5 to 10 years to complete a short film. Today, there are a number of animators making films annually (sometimes more than one). \n\n\u201cThe tools and processes to create animation are more accessible and cost less,\u201d agrees Glenn Gear. \u201cThere have been great strides made in the past 10 years in terms of software, especially on alternative platforms such as smartphones. Apps like Stop Motion Studio, Animation Desk, and RoughAnimator are low cost and offer a streamlined workflow for animation. You don't necessarily need a large studio with specialized equipment.\u201d\n\nSince the late 1990s, there has been a tsunami of animation programs and departments opening up across the world. To give the reader some context: I have been the Artistic Director of the [Ottawa International Animation Festival](http:\/\/www.animationfestival.ca\/) (OIAF) since the early 1990s. When I first started with the OIAF in 1991, there were 750 films submitted to the then biannual festival. Today, the OIAF receives in the range of 2,400 films (including features, VR, TV, student etc.) annually. \n\n![Still from \"Four Faces of the Moon\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/fourfaceofmoon_PjS2Mo.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nThe Simpsons (inspired by MTV and Sesame Street indirectly) showed producers and advertisers that animation could be profitable. This triggered an explosion in all avenues of animation and created a demand for talent. With the technological tools becoming more affordable, many educational institutions jumped on board to capitalize on the explosion\u2014and to train and educate a new generation of animators.\n\nIndigenous artists and youth have also benefited\u2014alongside increasing public awareness of the unjust and sometimes horrific manner that Indigenous people have been treated in Canada\u2014from these advancements. \u201cThere is more investment into teaching Indigenous youth and providing them with the digital tools alongside traditional knowledge and ways of working,\u201d says Gear. \n\n> As more and more Indigenous folks migrate towards city centers, there are more informal and formal networks of knowledge, resource, and skill sharing. There is still much to be done in this regard, but the institutions such as universities, colleges and government institutions are slowly changing to hopefully be more accountable and transparent to Indigenous folks.\n\n\"We now have access to new tools and platforms,\u201d adds Strong, whose Vancouver-based studio, [Spotted Fawn Productions](https:\/\/www.spottedfawnproductions.com\/), creates space for Indigenous artists in animation. It excites me to see more and more Indigenous people of all ages engaging with tools and technology to animate their stories. It\u2019s important that we lift each other up, celebrate our successes and always encourage other Indigenous storytellers to create.\"\n\n\"Our voices, cultures, and diverse stories are finally being heard by a larger public,\u201d adds Gear. \u201cWhen I asked filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin about the changes she has seen in the reception of Indigenous work in the past 10 years, she said, \u2018People are finally listening.\u2019\"\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-04-14 10:41:05","first_published_at":"2020-04-06 15:01:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-04-06 13:07:52","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:00","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":52}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

“人们终于听了” - indigenous动画升起

克里斯罗宾逊文化日

2020年4月14日

\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-06-15 09:22:06","first_published_at":"2020-06-04 15:01:52","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-04 11:56:37","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:27","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":53}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

建议21:制作Zines,而不是研究论文

Greta Rainbow为文化日

2020年6月15日

_They know this River will still be here long after we have turned to nuclear dust and blown away, saith the river..._\n>> -_Beholden: A poem as long as the river_, Rita Wong and Fred Wah\n\nRolling from one valley to another, streaming across coarse contours, sometimes surrendering to the whims of winds and pouring rain, other times cutting through the rock-ribbed plains; rivers have always made the most enchanted neighbourhoods. A river\u2019s ample bosom has cradled pioneering civilizations and nurtured childhood memories. Its panoramic views have kindled weary eyes and inspired grandiose dreams, and through centuries its gentle ripples have concocted timeless fables of love and romance. By the virtue of their romantic allure, rivers have always been a recurring theme in poetry and literature.\n\nWhile artists have always, liberally and quite blatantly, borrowed from nature; they have also been moved, time and again, to devote their craft to salvage the very landscapes that enriched their imagination. [_River Relations: A Beholder\u2019s Share of the Columbia River_](http:\/\/www.riverrelations.ca\/), an artistic investigation by a group of creatives from Emily Carr University of Art and Design (ECUAD), is one such venture that delves into the destruction inflicted upon by the \u2018damming and development\u2019 of the Columbia River, in the wake of the renegotiation of the Columbia River Treaty.\n\nRising in the clear waters of the Columbia Lake in B.C. and surging through glaciated Canadian Rocky Mountains, the Columbia River flows through the Kootenay River\u2014the river\u2019s largest tributary on the Canadian divide of the border. It enters the U.S. at the confluence of Pend d\u2019Orielle River in the Washington state, before conclusively disappearing into the Pacific Ocean near Astoria, Oregon. Columbia River is a water wonderland, flowing with ferocious abundance, making it the largest river in North America\u2019s Pacific Northwest region, and a sanctuary for the largest salmon runs in the world.\n\n![The Columbia River. Photo Courtesy of Fred Wah.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/columbia-river-fred-wah-1_avhEyr.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nModern civilization has turned rivers into economic powerhouses, plugging them with gargantuan concrete structures to harness hydroelectric power and divert water for irrigation. The Columbia River was subjected to a similar fate, transforming its free-flowing bliss into a curse. A violent flooding spell in 1948 that wrecked the Fraser Valley in B.C, Canada, and the town of Vanport in Oregon, U.S. became the impetus for securing a cooperative development between the two countries. The talks sought to regulate water flows and to capitalize on the river\u2019s enormous hydroelectric capacity, finally culminating into a formal [_Columbia River Treaty (CRT)_](https:\/\/www.canada.ca\/en\/environment-climate-change\/corporate\/international-affairs\/partnerships-countries-regions\/north-america\/canada-united-states-columbia-river.html) in 1964. Canada committed to build three water storage reservoirs in exchange for an upfront payment of $64 million in recompense for extending sixty years of flood control to U.S., in addition to receiving one-half of the estimated hydro-power generation benefits to the U.S, on continual basis. Today, CRT is upheld as a successful example of two countries \u2018sharing the benefits\u2019 through a collaborative transboundary arrangement. Yet, the ramifications the treaty had on the Indigenous peoples and the river\u2019s salmon reserve have become a despicable addendum to the treaty.\n\nThe _River Relations_\u2019 team scrutinized historical and contemporary images of the Columbia River to understand the evolution of its landscape, outrageously interrupted by dams. The most notable output of the project is the image-text poem, published in the form of a book, entitled [_\u2018Beholden: A poem as long as the river\u2019_](https:\/\/talonbooks.com\/books\/beholden), composed by [Fred Wah](https:\/\/fredwah.ca\/), a former Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate and [Rita Wong](https:\/\/www.poetryinvoice.com\/poems\/poets\/rita-wong), a poet and an environmental activist.\n\n![Revelstoke Dam, B.C. Artwork by Nick Conbere and Photography by John Holmgren.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/revelstokedamreservoir-1_bi2Kz3.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nWah and Wong travelled the entire river stretch, from Canal Flats in the East Kootenay all the way to Fort Astoria, Oregon as a part of their research for the book. \u2018Having lived along the Kootenay River for much of my life I had always felt that the river should be called the Kootenay; that the Columbia was really just a tributary of the Kootenay\u2019, says Wah.\n\nWah believes that the treaty insolently disregarded the \u2018spiritual value\u2019 attributed to the river\u2019s salmon by the First Nations. To them, salmon is the \u2018harbinger of good news\u2019, revered as a gift from the salmon king. They believed that the salmon were actually humans, and at the start of each salmon season, they would transform into fish form on the king\u2019s command. They also celebrated the \u2018First Salmon Ceremony\u2019 to mark the beginning of each salmon season. Even today, certain tribes celebrate \u2018Salmon ceremonies\u2019 with a communal prayer for the salmon to return and inhabit the river again.\n\nThe loss of salmon has chronicled a poignant chapter in the river\u2019s history. Wong was swamped with emotions when she watched Upstream Battle (a documentary by Ben Kempas) \u2018One moment that always stays with me from that film is footage of salmon trying to swim upstream to return to their spawning grounds - and hitting a dam, and trying over and over to get beyond that obstacle - it\u2019s a heart wrenching glimpse into the painful destruction wrought by megadams.\u2019\n\nBeholden is a reflection on the devastation brought on by the damming of the river and focuses on themes of colonization, indigenous rights and mutilation of the river\u2019s ecology. \u2018Most of the language in the poem comes from a struggle between simply describing the river, (..) and finding ways to \u201clisten\u201d to the river\u2019. It was Wah who proposed to write \u2018a poem as long as the river\u2019, in collaboration with Wong. \u2018With him writing along one side, and me along the other, the words came from our experiences along the river\u2019, Wong reminisces about the poem\u2019s origins. \u2018Each of us would write along a shore of the river, from beginning to end, occasionally having our texts cross the river at bridges or dams. Rita\u2019s and my texts were not in conversation as they were written, but, finally, feel tethered to a similar poetic impulse and imagination\u2019 explains Wah.\n\n![Book cover, _Beholden: A poem as long as the river_, illustrations by Nick Conbere and cover image by Genevieve Robertson.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/beholden-book-cover-1_bB7z2B.jpeg){.pull .right}\n\nJust like Wah, Wong also let the river \u2018speak to\u2019 her and guide her writing process. \u2018Near the headwaters of the river, I made an offering and asked the river for permission to share the words arising from my journeys along it. I listened and keep listening.\u2019\n\nNick Conbere, a visual artist and an Associate Professor at ECUAD, [skillfully transcribed Beholden on a 114 feet long map of the Columbia River](http:\/\/www.nickconbere.com\/river-relations.html), with Wah and Wong\u2019s share of poems meandering along the river, as if two tributaries spiraling the entire stretch of the river. The poem\u2019s two halves are distinctly recognizable, as Wah\u2019s half has been typeset whereas Wong\u2019s is handwritten, a decision she consciously made. \u2018I felt it was important to stay with the bodily experience of writing by hand and following the river\u2019s contours. It felt closer to the experiential aspect of being along the river (\u2026)\u2019 While the book was shortlisted for the B.C Book Prize, the poem\u2019s winding digital image has been showcased at numerous art exhibitions.\n\n![Rita Wong and Fred Wah, _Beholden: a poem as long as the river_. The Gallery Installation. Photo by Touchstones Nelson Museum.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/gallery-installation-1_H8ib2Z.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nAs the two countries renegotiate the Treaty, uncertainty abounds. Would the revision of the Treaty offer a second chance at reviving all that is lost? Only time can tell. Wong reminds us \u2018There are ways to use the land that help to regenerate or heal it \u2026 (the way) Indigenous peoples coexisted with what was here - taking care of it rather than exhausting it\u2019.\n\nToday, many artists romanticize nature as well as assume an advocate\u2019s mantle. Wong believes one way the artists can solicit support for environmental issues is by dwelling on \u2018how to heal our relations with the land and water\u2019, and by imploring the society \u2018to actually care about this\u2019.\n\nThe project has drawn to a close, and the artists have moved on to explore further avenues of nature advocacy. For as long as there is heartache for all that has been lost, I\u2019ll quote Wah;\n\n> _Let\u2019s reach for solace of water to find some deep pool of larger memory that will float us past Savage Island_.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-07-08 13:21:08","first_published_at":"2020-06-04 16:58:40","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-04 16:19:23","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:40","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":54}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

听河:哥伦比亚河的颂歌

SABA DAR供文化日

7月8日,2020年7月8日

Tea Base is a curious community arts space tucked away in Tkaronto\/Toronto\u2019s Chinatown Centre Mall. Tea Base aims to make accessible space for intergenerational activists and artists who support social justice movements in and around Chinatown. Tea Base is a space that develops solidarity across marginalized groups through relationships, joy, and collaboration.\n\nOne of the first gatherings held at [Tea Base](https:\/\/www.myteabase.com\/) was a wholesome meal. Hot pot is a shared meal where family and friends prepare a variety of raw ingredients to mingle and cook around in a communal pot of boiling broth. The organizers asked their community to bring ingredients, as if the items themselves were a symbolic gesture for the guidance and insight each person offered. Everyone huddled around the pot, breaking the ice by talking about the food items they brought. Throughout the meal, questions like, \u201cWhat kind of programming do you want to see?\u201d and \u201cWhat are the needs we can use this space to address?\u201d were discussed as bellies filled up. This simple act of sharing and asking questions was the impetus of how Tea Base started and continues to be at the centre of their work.\n\n![Tea Base is a curious community arts space tucked away in Tkaronto\/Toronto\u2019s Chinatown Centre Mall. Photo credit: Jae Ng.](assets\/National\/blog\/tea-base\/mg-9439_bSV5iE.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nTea Base opened in January of 2019 and is predominantly run by queer, non-binary, East Asians. Co-owner\/Co-parent Hannia Cheng jokes, \u201cBeing gay and Asian? That\u2019s unheard of.\" Tea Base has become a hub for East and South-East Asians of all genders and sexualities to not only comfortably express themselves, but to also embrace their cultural roots and relate to their heritage. Hannia explains, \u201cOther than Unit 2, Tea Base is one of the only few DIY spaces left downtown that prioritize queer and racialized artists. The collective response we\u2019ve received shows the need for these types of spaces.\u201d \n\nAs Tea Base grows, they hope to create opportunities for more intergenerational relationships between artists and activists through participatory art-based, social, and cultural programming. Hannia describes the overall vibe as \u201cTake off your shoes, living room energy...\u201d, It\u2019s this intention of making space for people to share their stories and lived experiences that make the space feel so cozy, \u201c...Mahjong Monday is mostly an excuse to hang out once a week. The ideas and collaborations happen organically as a result of fostering trust with each other.\u201d Hannia notes, \u201cWe don\u2019t fit into normative capitalist notions of success, we\u2019re in it for the people.\u201d Most of their events are Pay-What-You-Can and sliding scale. Other in-house programming includes Macrame with Jade, Bitch & Stitch, Tea Base & Chill, Mother Tongue language caf\u00e9s, and even a Chinese fermentation tasting workshop with [Paocai Bio](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/paocaibio\/?hl=en). \n\n![Mahjong Mondays is by far Tea Base's most popular event. They play and teach from 3-8pm every Monday. Photo credit: Jae Ng.](assets\/National\/blog\/tea-base\/tb-optimized_MLBHh5.png){.overflow}\n\nWith a housing crisis upon the city, it\u2019s becoming evident that affordable spaces are nearly impossible to come by, pushing already marginalized communities further to the outskirts of Toronto. That\u2019s why Tea Base has also grown as a hub for local activism. Chinatown has long been the target of displacement gentrification by condo developers. Co-owner\/Co-parent, Florence Yee, emphasizes the importance of the connections made at Tea Base, \u201cThere\u2019s a larger commonality and interest in doing better for the neighbourhood. Fighting gentrification, all these housing and racial injustices, this young queer politically active space is cultivated well.\u201d Joining a longstanding legacy of Chinatown activist groups, a recent ad-hoc watchdog group, Friends of Chinatown Toronto (FOCT) was formed and is based out of Tea Base. Hannia shares, \u201cChinatown activists have been around forever, we want to learn from them and with them.\u201d \n\nHonouring the existing Chinatown community is part of Tea Base\u2019s mandate. \u201cArt spaces can be inadvertently gentrifying...\u201d says Co-creative Director, Chris Carriere, \u201c...It\u2019s exciting when someone who\u2019s [an] elder visits, or when people bring their kids in. It\u2019s easy for us to get 20-year-olds from the art scene, but when we connect to other generations, the intergenerational conversation shows we can be a space that is open [to all].\u201d In the spring of 2019, with a complete volunteer effort, Tea Base turned what was once a pile of bricks sitting in the mall\u2019s courtyard for 7 years into a garden called \u201cThe Anti-Displacement Rainbow Garden''. The courtyard became a thriving common area for the Kumon kids to play in the garden and for the seniors to play Chinese chess on the stage.\n\nCurrently in its second year of operation, Tea Base wants to leverage their platform to support and amplify other grassroots efforts. Policy Director, Jennifer Chan, offers, \u201cAs East Asians, we\u2019re now established as a diaspora\u2026we faced our challenges to get where we are, and \\[now] we need to lift others up.\u201d They hope to continue getting to know different collectives with an intention to build a truly Pan-Asian community arts ecosystem. \n\n![\u201cRelationships move at the speed of trust. Social movements move at the speed of relationships.\u201d - Jennifer Bailey. Photo credit: Jae Ng.](assets\/National\/blog\/tea-base\/mg-9600_5mk7ID.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nIn the midst of the pandemic, they\u2019ve had to reimagine what community engagement looks like. \u201cA lot of people are very isolated, not just in quarantine...people find stability and friendships at Tea Base \\[that] they can rely on,\" states Florence. Most recently, Tea Base wrapped up their 2020 Spring Camp, a series of four online events that gathered their community together for some quality digital connection, like a knot-making workshop and a town hall for example. They\u2019ve also written up their [Community Guidelines](https:\/\/www.myteabase.com\/community-guidelines) (with consultation from the town hall) for a safer space.\n\nPlans for the future are already in the works. \u201cComing out of Covid, we will need time and help to get things going,\u201d Chris asks for a call to action. Tea Base is open 3-4 times throughout the week with events usually on the weekend. You don\u2019t need to purchase anything to exist at Tea Base, genuine human-to-human conversation is enough. Florence suggests, \u201cJust show up! A lot of what we do is about presence, and being there. The small and big ways.\u201d\n\n[Tea Base](https:\/\/www.myteabase.com\/) updates their hours on a weekly basis every Monday via [Instagram](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/tea.base\/).\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-07-21 23:39:37","first_published_at":"2020-06-23 13:25:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-23 12:41:49","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:53","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":58}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

唐人街的起居室:崭露头角的活动家社区的聚会场所

安踏陈文化日

7月21日,2020年

Building a boat is a process of thinking, knowing, and doing\u2014of learning and creating, which are the two most important of all human activities. It is not a single big job; it is a thousand little jobs, some of them done over and over and over.\n\n![Getting the hang of things (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture2_fFcp3r.png){.overflow}\n\nDay 1 is over before you know it, and everyone goes home a little sore, but satisfied to see their boat taking shape. By Day 2, with the exterior of the rowboat complete, the builders add the interior frames, seat risers, and seats. In between the major steps there is always more planing, sanding, and tweaking to do to prepare for the big launch on Day 3.\n\nSituated on the boardwalk in the heart of the busy Halifax waterfront, the [Maritime Museum of the Atlantic (MMA)](https:\/\/maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca\/) was searching for a way to open up the doors of its boatshop and become a community anchor. They found it through the unexpected intersection of traditional craftsmanship and youth outreach. \n\n![The museum is at the heart of the Halifax waterfront (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture3_A544gz.png){.overflow}\n\nInspired by the Family Boatbuilding concept introduced in WoodenBoat Magazine in 1998, the MMA\u2019s program is simple: gather a few \u2018families\u2019\u2014whether bound by blood or simply friendship\u2014give each group a kit of pieces for a 12-foot rowboat, and help them put the pieces together in three days. Family Boatbuilding spreads wooden boatbuilding to a wider audience and keep the craft alive and vital.[^note1]\n\n![All hands on deck (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture4_iqT9b5.png){.overflow}\n\nThe [Alexandria Seaport Foundation](https:\/\/alexandriaseaport.org\/), in particular, ran with this idea. They introduced an element of social action, training and employing at-risk youth as apprentices. In the process, they also raised the profile of the movement, publishing Bevin\u2019s Skiff plans for other institutions to use for their own events.[^note2] This is where the MMA found their direct inspiration, and they are not alone. Similar programs have sprung up throughout the Eastern Seaboard and along the West Coast, independently run by an eclectic collection of museums, historical societies, boatyards, and community non-profits.[^note3]\n\nThe MMA built its first two boats in 2014. The next year, three. Then, four. Now, it runs the program multiple times a year in partnership with Mount Saint Vincent University\u2019s Child and Youth Studies program.[^note4]\n\n![In June 2018, Eamonn Doorly the master boatbuilder from the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax, led a boat building workshop with students from Pictou Landing First Nation](https:\/\/youtu.be\/7EsIdJwNDKY)\n\nEvery time the MMA runs the program, the excitement on Day 3 feels fresh. By midday, the last quarter knee has been sanded, and each boat christened and ready to launch. Everyone gathers on the floating dock, poised to push their boats into Halifax harbour. They seem a long way from the Day 1 version of themselves. At first, they were reluctant to jump in with hammer in hand, afraid of making mistakes. They soon realized that, in itself, was a mistake. Here, mistakes are celebrated instead of frowned upon\u2014they\u2019re the best teachers. \n\n![Launch day as Theodore the Tugboat looks on (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture5_TxOoWY.png){.overflow}\n\nThe participants now know how to sand, plane, use a bevel gauge, build upside down, and drill straight. They can also translate angles, apply boatbuilding math, tell the difference between types of wood, and identify a transom or a seat riser. Above all, they\u2019ve absorbed craftsmanship as a concept\u2014what Richard Sennet called \u201cthe desire to do a job well for its own sake.\u201d[^note5] And no one is breaking drill bits anymore.\n\nThe MMA\u2019s Building Boats, Changing Lives program is building capacity in practical building skills, traditional wooden boatbuilding, and heritage craft. But they are doing much more than that.\n\nFirst, they\u2019re building up and empowering youth. Through something as subtle as hammering a nail, they\u2019re connecting youth to identity and belonging, through shared Maritime heritage. The type of boat commonly built during Family Boatbuilding, a flat-bottomed skiff, \u201ccan be found anywhere in the Atlantic provinces, not to mention anywhere in the world\u201d and has been historically indispensable for the inshore fishery.[^note6] Amateur and professional boatbuilders alike have built versions of it for centuries in North America.[^note7] These newest boatbuilders coming out of the MMA join a long line of those who have come before. They now have an elemental connection to boatbuilding heritage by literally making that heritage their own.\n\n![The latest links in a long line of wooden boatbuilding tradition (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture6_BfnHfe.png){.overflow}\n\nSecond, and finally, the MMA is building a culture of craftsmanship\u2014one boat and one boatbuilder at a time. It\u2019s a culture that values patience, hard work, the impulse to preserve and honour the past, and good old-fashioned gumption in the face of mistakes.\n\nNova Scotia sailor, boatbuilder, and writer, Silver Donald Cameron once said, \u201cBuilding a boat is a process of thinking, knowing, and doing\u2014of learning and creating, which are the two most important of all human activities. It is not a single big job; it is a thousand little jobs, some of them done over and over and over.\u201d[^note8] The MMA teaches everyone who picks up a hammer or a drill during its program that boatbuilding \u2013 like life \u2013 is just a constant process of fixing our mistakes. While we do not live in an ideal world, we can continue to try and make it one.\n\n[^note1]: The WoodenBoat Show, \u201cFamily Boatbuilding,\u201d WoodenBoat Magazine, accessed May 1, 2020, https:\/\/thewoodenboatshow.com\/family-boatbuilding\/.\n[^note2]: \u201cFutures Handcrafted: About the Apprentice Program,\u201d Alexandria Seaport Foundation, accessed May 1, 2020, https:\/\/alexandriaseaport.org\/apprentice-program\/; \u201cBevin\u2019s Skiff,\u201d Alexandria Seaport Foundation, accessed May 1, 2020, https:\/\/alexandriaseaport.org\/get-engaged\/bevins-skiff\/.\n[^note3]: Some include the Antique Boat Museum in Thousand Islands, New York; the Reedville Fisherman\u2019s Museum in Reedville, Virgina; the Deltaville Maritime Museum in Deltaville, Virginia; the Lewes Historical Society in Lewes, Delaware; TSNE Mission Works in Boston, Massachusetts; the University of New Hampshire in Barrington, New Hampshire; and Eddon Boatyard in Gig Harbour, Washington.\n[^note4]: I helped out with the MMA\u2019s program in 2015 and 2016, helping to build the kits and serving as a small group leader.\n[^note5]: Richard Sennett, The Craftsman (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008), 9.\n[^note6]: David A. Walker and Wayne Barrett, Small Wooden Boats of the Atlantic (Halifax: Nimbus Publishing, 1990), 10. \n[^note7]: Howard I. Chapelle, American Small Sailing Craft: Their Design, Development, and Construction (New York: W. W. Norton, 1951), 100.\n[^note8]: Silver Donald Cameron, \u201cThe Nine-Year Seminar on Boatbuilding and Life,\u201d in We Belong to the Sea: A Nova Scotia Anthology, ed. Mary Stanton (Halifax, N.S.: Nimbus Publishing, 2001), 88.\n\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown's Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-08-05 09:57:42","first_published_at":"2020-06-15 08:59:15","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-15 08:40:58","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:26:05","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":57}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

在大西洋的海事博物馆,他们建立了更多的船只

Aleen Leigh Stanton为文化日

2020年8月5日

Early on I must have seemed like some ultra-persistent grade school child to staff at the Canadian Light Source, which in some ways isn\u2019t that far off, I try to keep in touch with that curious grade 5-6 kid as part of my art practice. \n\nIn 2016, Fransaskois new media artist and sculptor, [Jean-S\u00e9bastien Gauthier](https:\/\/jsgauthier.com\/) (hereinafter referred to as \"JS\"), signed up for a tour of the [Canadian Light Source](https:\/\/www.lightsource.ca\/) (CLS)...and then another, and another...until he was convinced he wanted to make art using the CLS. \n\nThe CLS is a national research facility, one of the largest science projects in our country\u2019s history, producing the brightest light in Canada\u2014millions of times brighter than even the sun\u2014used by more than 1,000 scientists from around the world every year in ground-breaking health, environmental, materials, and agricultural research.\n\n![Digital render mixing 3D scans, CT scans and 3D synchrotron radiation microCT data (2017).](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-scientist-light\/6-sample-and-hold_rBIGyc.jpeg){.small}\n\nThe synchrotron operates by accelerating streams of electrons to 99.99 per cent of the speed of light, fast enough to reach the moon in 1.3 seconds. Giant magnets bend the electron beam, creating a light millions of times brighter than the sun. When directed down beamlines, that light enables scientists to do analysis of physical samples such as plants and engine oil that is more detailed than with any other process, as well as to create images of structures at the molecular level.\n\nTo gain entry to this very exclusive instrument (there are only 40 synchrontons in the world and only one in Canada) JS realized he needed a partner, someone with inside access. He wrote a call for collaborators that was published in the CLS newsletter. Somewhat surprisingly he received numerous replies, but Dr. Brian Eames' response stood out.\n\n[Dr. Brian Eames](http:\/\/eameslab.ca\/) is a researcher at the University of Saskatchewan, College of Medicine, in the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, who uses the CLS, imaging techniques, and molecular approaches to study how cells turn into bone and cartilage. \n\nAll it took was one meeting over coffee, where they shared concepts on evolutionary biology and spitballed ideas for using the synchrotron to explore evolution, and they knew they could develop an exceptional collaboration. JS regularly visited Brian\u2019s lab where they continuously discussed intersecting interests and possibilities. Based on their talks, JS drafted grant applications, one of which was accepted by Canada Council for the Arts.\n\n![JS and Dr. Brian Eames looking over the synchrotron.](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-scientist-light\/bio-image-brian-js-1_n0UA3B.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nSince 2017 JS has served as the Artist-in-residence at the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, at the University of Saskatchewan and facilities of the CLS synchrotron. No other artist has been granted research time at the CLS with artistic inquiry and aesthetic experimentation as the primary objective. \n\n> Art and science are natural collaborators. In the same way that art alters a perspective, or provides an unexpected revelation, so does science...\n\nCutting-edge 3D synchrotron radiation imaging techniques were used to create an immersive video installation, [_Dans la Mesure\/Within Measure_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/235157911), which explores developmental biology, evolution, and the complex unity between humans and other life forms (specifically zebrafish, tiny and robust model organisms often used in genetic medical research.) \n\nAnd their collaboration continues. In 2019, JS and Brian created an interactive piece for Nuit Blanche (which was shown at the U of S campus and downtown Saskatoon.) [_Our Glass_](https:\/\/jsgauthier.com\/our-glass) engages viewers of all ages to peer within an hourglass, showing how embryonic development compares among animals with whom we share a close genetic heritage. \n\n![_Still Life_ (after Ernst Haeckel), JS Gauthier, 2017.](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-scientist-light\/04-xrayhaekel-jsg-2017-5x7-72-1-copy_SjYQ87.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nJeff Cutler, past CLS Chief Strategic Relations officer had this to say, \u201cArt and science are natural collaborators. In the same way that art alters a perspective, or provides an unexpected revelation, so does science. Researchers from around the world come to our light source in order to see things differently, and their findings often change how we look at the world. It\u2019s this search for a new way of seeing things that brings art and science together, and that\u2019s why it\u2019s important for us to work with artists like JS. Not only does his work introduce the CLS to a new audience, but he has also challenged us to see our own work differently.\u201d\n\nStay tuned for more as JS continues to redefine contemporary art practices through research, technology, and building bridges across disciplines and people... he recently bought a VR (virtual reality) helmet!\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [Chinatown's Living Room: _The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-08-18 14:11:09","first_published_at":"2020-06-10 16:39:35","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-10 16:24:34","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:26:18","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":56}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

当你混合艺术家,科学家和一个非常明亮的光线时会发生什么?

vivian orr文化日

2020年8月18日

As the Coronavirus restrictions gradually settled over my life in mid-March and my regular book club was put on hiatus, I found myself craving an arts-focused connection...\n\nAs the minutes tick towards 7pm, my computer is perched precariously on a stack of books while pages of discussion prompts lie on the desk underneath a dog-eared copy of our May book choice. The Facebook video interface is poised for recording; all I have to do now is hit the \u2018Go Live\u2019 button to begin our meeting. The 7pm MST beginning is late for some of our members in eastern Canada, but the promise of a satisfying deconstruction of our latest read is enough to pull people back to their devices at this hour. Once I begin the recording there is little preamble, I pause only to thank people for joining before I jump right into the discussion. After the requisite 40 second delay in the video feed, comments begin pouring in: a whole month\u2019s worth of observations scrolling down the screen.\n\nThere are two different kinds of book clubs. The first is an informal gathering of friends, eager to indulge in some libations and friendly gossip with some limited book talk thrown in. The second is a formal club with a regular meeting time, specific book choices voted on in advance and a discussion focused solely on the chosen reading material. Quite often the latter is made up of strangers, brought together over a love of the written word and a desire to meet like-minded people. Now, while in-person gatherings are on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, attention is shifting to online groups as an accessible and efficient way of connecting those with similar interests.\n\n![Anne leading a discussion during an Ivereadthis Online Book Club meeting.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/img-1017-1_EkDI7C.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nAs the Coronavirus restrictions gradually settled over my life in mid-March and my regular book club was put on hiatus, I found myself craving an arts-focused connection. As a critic I\u2019m lucky enough to have books mailed directly to my home, so I invited fellow bookworms to join me in reading through my collection by starting the [Ivereadthis Online Book Club](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/groups\/ivereadthisonlinebookclub\/). The Club is a free and public Facebook group, connecting once a month over live video chats which allow for real-time discussion with an unlimited number of participants. As I write this our group includes over 200 members, but after only two meetings it is clear who will actively participate in our video chats and who is content to hover on the sidelines, popping in and out for book recommendations.\n\nFace-to-face interactions ensure a certain level of decorum is upheld while online discussions can easily devolve into bickering. As the group moderator I was mildly concerned that our conversations may become offensive, or worse, trolled by people looking to stir up pointless controversy. To avoid this, I decided our group would focus on works of fiction which allow people to voice opinions on issues external to their own lives, but relevant all the same. For example, character motivations are a frequent topic of discussion; why did someone act that way, were they justified in lashing out, what would you have done in the same situation? Criticizing the actions of a character tends to incite less controversy, keeping the tone of our discussions light and entertaining regardless of the dark subject matter the chosen books may address. \n\n![Photo courtesy of Vlada Karpovish.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/vlada-karpovich_5ex6dE.jpeg){.pull}\n\nDespite the ease of voicing one\u2019s thoughts to strangers across the country in sweatpants, there are obvious downsides to staying solely online. Fran Kimmel, a writer and book club veteran points out: \u201cwhen online I might not try quite as hard to get my point across or to understand other people\u2019s points. There\u2019s the added layer of technology separating you from others, and all those emotional intelligence cues we get through body language are stripped away. But I\u2019m also hopeful that this is a learned skill, and the more we meet online, the better we\u2019ll become at sharing deeply.\u201d \n\nThe only distinguishing factor of each group member is their thumbnail-sized picture, so there is a distinct lack of background information to base judgements on. If someone voices an opinion that you vehemently disagree with at an in-person meeting, you are likely to fall back on their body language and tone of voice to help justify their comment. Online we can only go by a person\u2019s text-based contributions\u2014so although it seems easier to participate in a virtual chat, our words hold more weight than usual. Readers are especially aware of how important word choice can be, so thankfully our conversations have remained respectful and empathetic, even during disagreements. \n\nAs the organizer, my one question that looms above all others is the likelihood this club will continue. COVID-19 has not only shifted the way we currently interact with others, it has altered the way we imagine our future communications; the ease in which we have shifted our events online demonstrates this new way of meeting can continue even when moving restrictions have lifted. And even if the membership of the Ivereadthis Online Book Club slowly dwindles once life returns to normal, members now see the benefits to joining other public clubs like this in the future. One of the group\u2019s members, Jolena, confirms this newly discovered interest is one she\u2019ll continue with: \u201cI would join another book club, it was a great experience to be able to discuss a topic among peers.\u201d Knowing our members feel this way is incredibly validating\u2014the cultural richness of literature is a wonderful gift to share with others, especially with those you never would have met otherwise.\n\n![Photo courtesy of Parth Shah.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/parth-shah_Kvywu1.jpeg){.overflow}\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [Chinatown's Living Room: _The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-09-02 10:10:02","first_published_at":"2020-06-10 12:38:44","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-10 12:38:07","updated_at":"2020-09-02 10:10:02","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published","pivot":{"post_category_id":4,"post_id":55}}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

陌生人和小说

安妮洛根文化日

2020年9月2日