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迈克绿色文化日

2021年6月29日

当较少的时候:剧院可以从一年中学习慢动作

梅根狩猎文化日

7月28日,2021年

刷新:如何在Instagram重新定义艺术社区的一年

eva莫里森文化日

7月15日,2021年

My perspective, however, is that if we want to produce truly innovative work post-COVID, the industry needs to learn from the rest of us\u2014those whose pandemic experiences were defined by uncertainty, CERB payments, and an unintended pause from theatre\u2019s unrelenting burnout culture.\n\nFor [Rebecca Bauer](https:\/\/rebeccabaueractor.com\/), a Montr\u00e9al-based theatre artist, the decision not to fight to \u201cstay relevant\u201d during the pandemic was an easy one.\n\n\u201cMy hunch is that a lot of Canadian theatre artists don\u2019t understand what it means to give into the process,\u201d Bauer said.\n\n![Rebecca Bauer. Photo by Jeremy Cabrera.](assets\/National\/blog\/when-less-is-more\/image5-1_OP93hG.jpg){.small.right}\n\nAs an emerging artist myself, her words resonated with me. I have been fortunate enough to dip my toes in multiple creative industries\u2014theatre, film, magazine publishing\u2014and I\u2019ve noticed that while many artistic institutions are invested in appearing socially progressive and forward-thinking, this investment stops short of tangibly improving working conditions. Many artists find themselves expected to accept unpaid labour, balance full-time rehearsal commitments with day jobs outside the field, and the pressure to prioritize commercial viability over artistic potential. None of this feels innovative\u2014or sustainable.\n\nIn all honesty, I understand how easy it can be for an artist (especially one just breaking into the theatre world) to accept these unfair conditions. After all, when the work you\u2019re doing feels so important to you, isn\u2019t it natural for the exploitation that comes with it to feel important too? Since the pandemic has started, however, some artists have noticed a shift in mentality.\n\nAccording to [Samantha Megarry](https:\/\/youngpeoplestheatre.org\/dramaschool\/front-page\/faculty\/samantha-megarry\/), a Toronto-based theatre practitioner, for many of her peers, the lockdown has spurred a period of reflection. While a pandemic could never be well-timed, the beginning of lockdown was a particular blow for Megarry, who had been back at work for just nine weeks following a year she had taken to treat a cancer diagnosis. As the pandemic continued, she watched as many artists engaged with the same questions she had been asking herself the year prior.\n\n![Bauer performs in Awake (Festival de la Bete Noire). Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bauer.](assets\/National\/blog\/when-less-is-more\/image3-1_HsZv7U.jpg)\n\n\u201cI think I went through the identity crisis that a lot of artists went through this past year, which is, who am I if not my job? What value do I have as a human if I am not doing this,\u201d Megarry said, reflecting on the period after her diagnosis. \u201cI had already learned some pretty big lessons by the time the pandemic happened.\u201d\n\nMegarry added that a lot of artists she knew continued to create in lockdown\u2014just primarily for their own fulfillment, rather than an audience or employer.\n\nUltimately, this is one of the most important things that theatre institutions should understand as the industry reopens: no one has stopped working this year. Staying alive during a pandemic is a feat that demands constant labour of all kinds. \n\n> The fact that artists have continued to create at all is a testament to our resilience, and it should be rewarded with structural industry change.\n\nIf we are truly committed to accessible, inclusive theatre, we need to include artists who cannot work within restrictive timelines such as the three-week\/three-week model. We need to re-prioritize rest, and acknowledge that in order to innovate, every artist must first have the ability to pursue a creation timeline that works for their needs.\n\n![Samantha Megarry.](assets\/National\/blog\/when-less-is-more\/image6-1_izzDwH.jpg){.small}\n\nOf course, artists cannot simply reshape these industry norms on their own. They\u2019ll need time and money, which, as Megarry noted, has not been extended to artists nearly enough during lockdown.\n\n\u201cEveryone\u2019s not in the same position. If you don\u2019t have the privilege to wait until theatre comes back, if you have a child to feed, you might have to find a new career at this point,\u201d Megarry pointed out. How else can we develop better, safer communities post-COVID? It\u2019s a loaded question, but one that needs to be answered. For Bauer, it\u2019s important enough that the next step in her creative practice is to pursue funding for professional development on the topic.\n\n\n\n\u201cI want to see \\[arts institutions] always put \\[artists\u2019] mental health and wellbeing first, even at the expense of a product,\u201d Bauer said.\n\nWhether the industry is ready to catch up by letting us slow down is something only time will tell.\n\n_Cover image: From the production The God Of Carnage. (Stendhal X; dir. Noah Drew). Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bauer._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-28 09:38:41","first_published_at":"2021-07-28 09:38:41","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-13 14:26:43","updated_at":"2021-07-28 09:48:41","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

当较少的时候:剧院可以从一年中学习慢动作

梅根狩猎文化日

7月28日,2021年

Instagram\u2019s real strength is its ubiquity. The platform evaded the frustrating pandemic cycle of closing, reopening, and closing again: it was just always there. And, while that pandemic cycle ran on a loop, communities were formed and solidified on this social network by sharing artworks, information, thoughts, and opinions as the art world changed around us.\n\nOver the past year, as pandemic measures forced galleries and other physical arts and culture venues to close, internet connectivity surged and Instagram became the predominant photo-sharing platform for many emerging artists. Stuck at home throughout provincial lockdowns and curfews, many of us swiped down to refresh our IG time-line multiple times a day\u2026maybe more than we\u2019d like to admit. There\u2019s no doubt that the smartphone-based platform flattens and simplifies both the actual artworks and the conversations around them; however, in the pandemic context it became an invaluable starting point to strengthen our community connections and define our intentions as artists or organizations going forward.\n\nAt times, the move online was a reluctant one. An Instagram post cannot compare to a physical art exhibition\u2014as any painter will be quick to tell you, it looks much better in person. An online interaction does not equate to a real-world social exchange, nor can we rely on the app to be the only community network, or even a truly democratic one. What\u2019s most interesting is how Instagram developed parallel to art spaces and institutions as a public system of connectivity and support between creatives. \n\nInstagram\u2019s real strength is its ubiquity. The platform evaded the frustrating pandemic cycle of closing, reopening, and closing again: it was just always there. And, while that pandemic cycle ran on a loop, communities were formed and solidified on this social network by sharing artworks, information, thoughts, and opinions as the art world changed around us. Throughout this past year, the platform was redefined as a site for alternate modes of sharing and selling contemporary art, through digital art spaces built by the community for the community.\n\n![Artwork featured on Peinture Contemporaine Que\u0301bec\u2019s Instagram feed. From left to right, works by: Robert Chayer, Chloe Gallagher-Smylie, Luca Fortin. Screenshot, June 2020. Photo courtesy of the author. ](assets\/National\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram\/peinturecontemporaine-quebec-feed-view_GxK30C.jpg)\n\nThis engagement on Instagram actively refreshed our systems of disseminating contemporary art. The platform facilitated the development of a community-led annex of emerging artists and events; when galleries and art institutions closed, curated accounts emerged to show work on a local and global scale. Over the course of an ex-tended lockdown in Qu\u00e9bec, new accounts like [@mtlpainters](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/mtlpainters\/?hl=en) and [@peinturecontemporaine_quebec](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/peinturecontemporaine_quebec\/?hl=en) gained traction with a mandate to keep our community strong. In Ontario, [@curatedtoronotart](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/curatedtorontoart\/?hl=en) has asserted itself as an online gallery space featuring works from Toronto-based artists. Existing on a free, accessible platform meant users could build networks easily, effectively forming a digital archive of emerging artists and works produced over the last year.\n\nInstagram-based projects also regenerated systems of marketing and selling artworks using online auctions or flash sales. [\u201cLes Encans de la Quarantaine\u201d](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/lesencansdelaquarantaine\/?hl=en), an initiative auctioning off local artworks on Instagram and Facebook, was founded during Montr\u00e9al\u2019s lockdown to support artists amidst uncertainty and anxiety. The team behind the project identified the spike in online media consumption during the early days of the pandemic and the sense of solidarity forming between artists on social media platforms, explaining that \u201cthe audience was there for it, waiting for anything to happen online.\u201d This year the project successfully helped over 300 artists sell works and the team recently received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts\u2019 Digital Strategy Fund to create an independent web platform, solidifying their position as a resource for independent and unrepresented artists in Canada.\n\nInstagram can also be a place to build and shape the identity of existing galleries and institutions, or call to restructure them. Throughout the pandemic, we witnessed power shifts within major Canadian cultural institutions\u2014labour disputes at the MAC, the controversy surrounding the firing of MMFA Director Nathalie Bondil, allegations of discrimination at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights\u2014which reflect a current heightened awareness of social and racial justice issues. In this context as well, Instagram prevailed as an accessible resource for the arts community, as accounts like [@artsaccountability](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/artsaccountability\/?hl=en) shared information surrounding current events. In this way, Instagram was used as a tool to amplify voices calling out racism and injustices in the art world.\n\n![Mohamemed Musallam's artwork as seen on the Les Encans de la quarantine website. Screenshot, June 2020. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram\/encan-n_mrsygl.jpg)\n\nThis opened a space for institutions to reinstate their intentions on Instagram, already a platform for identity building. Artist-run centre Articule posted an [open letter](https:\/\/www.articule.org\/en\/open-letter-to-artist-centres-moving-beyond-solidarity-statements) to their contemporaries in Qu\u00e9bec, calling to move beyond statements of solidarity against systemic oppression online by aiming to integrate concrete changes into their programming. As they wrote, \u201cit is not adequate to post once a year on Instagram as proof of progressive politics or to rewrite an About section to include a mention of diversity\u2026We must commit to radical, tangible, long-term, proactive support for Black and Indigenous artists, members, curators, and publics.\u201d Moves like this one effectively used Instagram as an information-sharing tool and a starting point for progressive dialogue, while recognizing the performative quality of activism that is solely based online.\n\nInstagram has always been a place for discourse; users assert their opinions on everything from celebrity gossip to current events, but discussions on Instagram\u2014like the pictures, lifestyle blogs, and advertisements on the app\u2014can be misleading and do not show all angles. The photo-based format is simply not made for open dialogue, the algorithm prioritizes certain voices, and the app itself has been accused of deleting political posts. Recently, multiple Instagram members found their stories and posts on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) were removed from their social media on Red Dress Day, a day meant to raise awareness of the issue. Instagram promptly took to Twitter to assert that it was \u201ca global technical issue not related to any topic\u201d and was met with skepticism and mistrust. This series of events was immediately circulated in new posts and stories, encouraging users to research and raise awareness offline as well. While the app\u2019s ability to instantly transmit information is valuable, it functions best as a means of connection and point of departure for conversations, mobilization, and social change that happens beyond Instagram. \n\nBoth political movements and artistic ones are primarily, and indispensably, situated in real life; the two-dimensional aspect of viewing artworks on Instagram also applies to the dialogue around them. However, in the absence of public spaces over the last year, the digital sphere was reinforced as a tool for connecting, networking, and spreading information. Instagram has allowed us to reimagine systems of sharing and selling artworks, methods of community-building, and the hierarchies in place in the art world and beyond. As we all move towards a post-pandemic reality, it\u2019s clear that the ubiquity of Instagram and its new role as a resource for social equity will hold us accountable in creating inclusive and informed communities both on and offline.\n\n_Cover image: Artwork featured on Mtl Painters' Instagram feed. From left to right, paintings by: Francisco De La Barra, Catherine H\u00e9lie-Harvey, Petro Psillos, Marie-Chlo\u00e9 Duval, Chlo\u00e9 Gagnon, Eva Morrison. Screenshot, June 2021. Photo courtesy of the author._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-15 09:23:23","first_published_at":"2021-06-23 12:09:37","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-23 11:52:35","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:42:29","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

刷新:如何在Instagram重新定义艺术社区的一年

eva莫里森文化日

7月15日,2021年

A lot of the time, you're asked to simplify things and make your vision fit into something that settler or white audiences could understand better. And we didn't try to do that.\n\nAccording to Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, Curator of Inuit Art for the Government of Nunavut\u2019s Department of Culture and Heritage, who is one of _INUA\u2019s_ four co-curators, this show reimagines the exhibition of Inuit art in many ways. Most important, she says, \u201cWe're all Inuit, and it was all Inuit at every level of the project. Our project manager at the WAG is an Inuk, our exhibition designer is an Inuk, our catalog designer is an Inuk.\u201d\n\n![_INUA_ Curatorial Team. From L-R: Kablusiak, Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, asinnajaq, Dr. Heather Igloliorte. Photo courtesy of WAG.](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/inua-curatorial-team_dnyDh4.jpg)\n\n_INUA\u2019s_ lead curator, Dr. Heather Igloliorte, who\u2019s originally from Nunatsiavut (Labrador), is Assistant Professor and University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement at Montreal\u2019s Concordia University. The other _INUA_ co-curators are Kablusiak, a Calgary-based multi-disciplinary Inuk artist who was born in Yellowknife, and asinnajaq, an urban Inuk artist and curator from Inukjuak, Nunavik, who grew up in Montr\u00e9al.\n\nTo select works for _INUA_, an acronym for Inuit Nunangat Ungammuaktut Atautikkut, meaning \u201clife force\u201d or \u201cInuit moving forward together,\u201d the curators reviewed pieces from the WAG\u2019s permanent collection and the Government of Nunavut\u2019s holdings. They worked with WAG staff to secure loans of artworks from artists and museums elsewhere. They also commissioned about 15 new works in a variety of media directly from Inuit artists.\n\n**Expanding the Perceptions of Inuit Art**\n\nWorking with an all-Inuit team empowered the curators to centre Inuit perspectives, asinnajaq says. \u201cA lot of the time, you're asked to simplify things and make your vision fit into something that settler or white audiences could understand better. And we didn't try to do that.\u201d\n\n\u201cIf you always simplify things,\u201d she continues, \u201caren't you feeding into making a stereotype?\u201d\n\nWhen people describe Inuit art, explains Zawadski, \u201cthey might say, \u2018Oh, it's prints and drawings from Cape Dorset. Or it's dancing bear carvings.\u2019 But Inuit art is much more than that.\u201d\n\n![Krista Ulujuk Zawadski. Photo courtesy of WAG](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/krista-ulujuk-zawadski_p1EUQ2.jpg){.small}\n\n\u201cWe tried to represent Inuit art in all forms,\u201d she says. \u201cThat includes LGBTQ+ artists. That includes urban Inuit artists. That includes Inuit from Alaska and Greenland and Calgary. That's something that not a lot of other shows have done.\u201d\n\nJocelyn Piirainen, the WAG\u2019s Assistant Curator of Inuit Art, who worked closely with the guest curators, says that in addition to carvings, textiles, prints, and drawings, _INUA_ features video, sound, multimedia installations, and other contemporary pieces.\n\n**Connecting to the Ancestors**\n\nEach co-curator also selected a work by a family member. These \u201cancestor pieces,\u201d Zawadski says, are \u201cour way of saying, \u2018This is who I am, where I come from.\u2019 Because that's something that we do as Inuit. People always ask you, \u2018Who are your parents, who are your grandparents?\u2019 They want to know where you're coming from, whose family do you belong to.\u201d\n\nSearching the WAG\u2019s permanent collection, Zawadski found a tusk carved by her great-grandfather Victor Sammurtok. Igloliorte\u2019s ancestor piece is a beaded, caribou-hide bag that her grandmother Suzannah Igloliorte made. asinnajaq chose a pair of fur-clad dolls crafted by her great aunt Elisapee Inukpuk, while Kablusiak\u2019s grandmother Ella Nasogaluak-Brown created _Arnaq & Angun_, dolls wearing traditional dresses from Inuvialuit in the Western Arctic. \n\n**Why Winnipeg?**\n\nThe issue of whether this major centre of Inuit art should be located outside traditional Inuit lands has been a contentious one. Yet as Zawadski says, \u201cBuilding Qaumajuq doesn't stop facilities being built in Inuit homelands.\u201d\n\n![asinnajaq. Photo courtesy of WAG](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/asinnajaq_suSmm1.jpg){.pull}{.right}\n\n\u201cIt\u2019s a very good thing to have a facility like this, and there should be more facilities,\u201d asinnajaq agrees. \u201cTo me, it\u2019s not a question of there being one and where should it be on earth. The answer is more.\u201d\n\nQaumajuq is creating new ways to connect to Inuit, too, particularly urban Inuit living in Winnipeg. \u201cIt\u2019s a big deal to have a building, a very beautiful, special building, that's dedicated to you,\u201d says asinnajaq.\n\n\n\n\n\nBut for Inuit, asinnajaq points out, \u201cIt\u2019s not just our space. It\u2019s our space being hosted in Treaty One territory by all of these nations\u201d in Winnipeg, the city with the largest Indigenous population in Canada. The Qaumajuq team is working on programming to promote engagement between the Inuit, First Nations, and M\u00e9tis communities.\n\n![Visible Vault, Qaumajuq, the Inuit art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Photo by Lindsay Reid.](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/visible-vault-qaumajuq-the-inuit-art-centre-at-the-winnipeg-art-gallery_DkQyg3.jpg)\n\nAnd beyond _INUA_, Piirainen suggests, Qaumajuq is holding this massive collection of Inuit art for safekeeping. A key Qaumajuq design feature is the three-story, glass [Visible Vault](https:\/\/www.wag.ca\/art\/visible-vault\/), displaying nearly 5,000 carvings, where Piirainen says everyone \u201ccan feel they are free to come in, walk around the vault, and really see the pieces up close.\u201d\n\n![Visible Vault, Qaumajuq, the Inuit art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Photo by Lindsay Reid.](assets\/National\/blog\/curating-inua\/visible-vault-qaumajuq-the-inuit-art-centre-at-the-winnipeg-art-gallery_jSh6rP.jpg)\n\n**Reaching Audiences Beyond Winnipeg**\n\nQaumajuq opened with a series of virtual events to show off its art to audiences across Canada and beyond. \n\n[An online version of the _INUA_ exhibit](https:\/\/www.wag.ca\/inua-online\/) on the Qaumajuq website enables visitors to walk through the exhibition remotely, and the museum is offering monthly virtual programs highlighting different components of the show. Igloliorte worked with a team of Inuit students to create [_Nagvaaqtavut | What We Found_](https:\/\/www.wag.ca\/inua-online\/#artwork), a multimedia guide that shares stories about some of the _INUA_ works. The WAG\u2019s education team has been offering virtual tours to Inuit students across the north as well.\n\nBy combining these online tools with in-person visits, Zawadski concludes, _INUA_ \u201cis going to reach far more people than any other Inuit art show ever has.\u201d\n\n_Cover image: Qaumajuq, the Inuit art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Photo by Lindsay Reid._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-15 09:05:57","first_published_at":"2021-07-15 09:05:57","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-13 14:00:14","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:42:16","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

加拿大最新的Inuit艺术展览的“Inua”

Carolyn B. Heller文化日

7月15日,2021年

...there is a strong desire for retroactively introducing more public spaces, fighting against the car-centric culture and creating more accessible spaces that can foster public life.\n\nThe City of Portland was not supportive at first. The Bureau of Buildings wanted to tear down the teahouse structure and rejected planning applications to turn the street intersection into a city square. However, the invigorated neighbours took matters into their own hands. Together with their children, they turned the intersection into a colourful plaza, setting up a library in a phone booth, a message board, a kid\u2019s playhouse, a corner for produce-sharing and a kiosk with a Thermos flask always full of tea.\n\n![Google Street View of the Share-It-Square intersection. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces\/streetview-2-1_BFGSFz.png)\n\nEventually, the City of Portland was convinced and granted conditional permit for these activities. \u201cThe neighbourhood had a design problem, not a human resources problem\u201d explains Charles Montgomery, a Canadian urban planner, in his 2015 book [Happy City](https:\/\/thehappycity.com\/the-book\/). The new plaza quickly resulted in a much-improved community spirit, new friendships, and torn down fences between yards. Annual events and a tradition of sharing tools and food has led to the square\u2019s name, the Share-It-Square. \n\nThis Square has been transforming Sellwood since the late 1990s. Every year, a new painting adorns the intersection. Neighbours maintain the many structures around the square and, most importantly, foster the new-found spirit of a functioning village. Inspired by the idea of a sharing economy, Mark and his team started the non-profit [City Repair](https:\/\/cityrepair.org\/share-it-square) that provides resources and support to similar projects. More than 100 new public spaces have since been created in Portland alone, and much more than 1,000 imitations all across the United States have been inspired by the Share-It-Square as well. Annually, City Repair\u2019s flagship event, the [Village Building Convergence](https:\/\/villagebuildingconvergence.com\/), takes place in order to inspire placemaking and community engagement all over the world. \n\n**What makes the Share-It-Square a Great Place?**\n\nShare-It-Square can look back at more than two decades of success\u2014but, what makes this a great public space? The [Project for Public Spaces](https:\/\/www.pps.org\/) (PPS), a non-profit from New York City, is an authoritative voice in judging the quality of public spaces. The organisation has established the following criteria for a good or great public space:\n\n![What Makes a Great Place? diagram courtesy of PPS.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces\/place-diagram-pps-1_aCVwfs.png)\n\nThe Share-It-Square is located in the heart of Sellwood, but not too far from a main street. This makes it accessible and well-linked, providing a \u201cfocus for community identity and gathering\u201d, as evaluated by the PPS. Comfort and image are evidenced in the long life of the square, the loving maintenance from neighbours and the always-available tea. A survey by City Repair showed that over 85% of neighbours felt a decrease in crime, a slowing of traffic, and an improvement in communication between neighbours. The Square also meets criteria such as diverse uses, activities throughout the year including neighbourhood celebrations, and increased sociability.\n\nBased on this success, the City of Portland adapted a new ordinance allowing for street intersections to be transformed into similar public spaces if 80% of neighbours within two blocks sign statements approving the plan. This has led to many similar projects in the city, such as the popular Sunnyside Piazza. \n\n**How to Reimagine Public Space in Canadian Cities**\n\nCOVID-19 has focused urban planners\u2019 attention on the importance of public spaces and community cohesion. Reimagining public spaces is an important part of this discourse. Places such as the Share-It-Square can increase residents\u2019 happiness and health. They provide important open-air meeting spaces that can prevent social isolation and make mutual support easier to organise. \n\nCanadian cities have recognised the importance of reimagining public spaces, also looking towards the 15-minute-city trend. In Montr\u00e9al, organisations such as [Active Neighbourhoods](https:\/\/participatoryplanning.ca\/active-neighbourhoods-canada) and the [Montr\u00e9al Urban Ecology Centre](https:\/\/urbanecologycenter.org\/) work to get citizens involved in the planning and nurturing of public spaces. In Toronto, there are initiatives for Indigenous placemaking that focus on designing and managing public space through a people-centred lens. And, in Vancouver, an event called \u201cReimagining City Streets and the Public Realm: Towards a Green and Connected City\u201d took place in March 2021, organised by the City and Simon Fraser University. Participants criticised that too much of city place (30% in the case of Vancouver) is dedicated to streets. Only 11% of Vancouver\u2019s city area is dedicated to parks. These examples show that throughout Canada, there is a strong desire for retroactively introducing more public spaces, fighting against the car-centric culture and creating more accessible spaces that can foster public life. \n\nSo, if we want to reimagine public spaces, we should learn from our neighbours and our traditions. And Mark Lakeman, together with his organisation, is a particularly good neighbour, sharing resources and inspiring everyone to imagine new public spaces even in unexpected corners. His message to Canadian readers? Find your creative capacity and fight loneliness in cities by turning spaces into places. \n\n**Sources**\n\n\u201cHappy City\u201d, Charles Montgomery 2015, pp. 354 \nInterview with Mark Lakeman from May 19th, 2021 \n[https:\/\/www.restreets.org\/case-studies\/share-it-square-sunnyside-piazza](https:\/\/www.restreets.org\/case-studies\/share-it-square-sunnyside-piazza) \n[https:\/\/medium.com\/@lauravonputtkamer\/reimagining-public-spaces-adapting-to-a-new-reality-9491959e9b7](https:\/\/medium.com\/@lauravonputtkamer\/reimagining-public-spaces-adapting-to-a-new-reality-9491959e9b7) [https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=mQosMm_foYM&ab_channel=ThePolishAmbassador](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=mQosMm_foYM&ab_channel=ThePolishAmbassador) \n[https:\/\/cityrepair.org\/share-it-square](https:\/\/cityrepair.org\/share-it-square) \n[https:\/\/www.pps.org\/places\/share-it-square](https:\/\/www.pps.org\/places\/share-it-square) \n[https:\/\/www.toposmagazine.com\/portlands-share-square\/](https:\/\/www.toposmagazine.com\/portlands-share-square\/)\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-13 09:26:57","first_published_at":"2021-06-17 13:41:49","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-17 13:28:09","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:57","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

恢复公共空间:俄勒冈州波特兰的分享IT-正方形

Laura Puttkamer为文化日

7月13日,2021年

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-13 09:06:59","first_published_at":"2021-07-12 16:14:42","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-12 16:00:19","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:42","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

Helm Studios将营利性音乐模型翻转到Empower艺术家

Aly laube文化日

7月13日,2021年

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 12:49:43","first_published_at":"2021-06-17 10:05:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-17 09:44:04","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:27","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

运动中的艺术

Aaron Rothermund为文化日

2021年6月29日

My process of reimagining theatre began with writing letters about these issues. I will never forget the private disclosures regarding systemic racism shared with me in this process: dozens of artists reached out to share, but were afraid to speak publicly. I felt a tremendous sense of responsibility to make my theatre community a better place. \n\nAn old theatre adage states that one must leave town before they are valued in their home community. I imagine a time where that is not the case. \n\n![Shot of Hannah Moscovitch's \"The Kaufman Kabaret\". Set design by Hannah Matiachuk. 2016. University of Alberta.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-theatre\/img-0987_O7cFMB.jpg){.pull}\n\nCOVID-19 dealt the theatre community a severe blow, but it also gave our community a crucial opportunity. Many have wondered, why now? Why bring a conversation on racial equity and equality now when the industry is struggling? Power structures are intimidating; we are often silent (or silenced) in their presence. It\u2019s much simpler to share stories and express disagreement when there is no work to be gained or lost. \n\nBut the deeper dynamics of gatekeeping aren\u2019t affected by a pandemic. There is power in wielding money and contracts, so it quickly becomes safer to remain passive. If those who have the financial means to sustain you are at odds with those challenging the status quo, where do we place our support? To whom do we have a responsibility? \n\n**Imagine\u2026 a healthy workplace.** \n\nEarly in my career, I elevated all my relationships to the status of family or close friends, to the detriment of my self-advocacy. It\u2019s not that deeper relationships aren\u2019t welcome, but we can forget that we are each other\u2019s co-workers. As professional colleagues, we need to uphold standards of employment that reflect the industry we want. \n\n\u201c\u2026employers have an obligation to create an inclusive workplace. This includes removing discriminatory barriers that prevent individuals from getting a job or promotion; accommodating employees who have special needs; and ensuring that the work environment is free from discrimination.\u201d (Alberta Human Rights Act) \n\nI\u2019m reimagining professional industry where meaningful engagement with marginalized communities results in fewer barriers. When barriers go unchallenged because challengers risk losing their livelihoods, the industry suffers as much as the individual. The theatre industry suffers a lack of credibility when it fights positive change. \n\nAnyone can forget their responsibility and connection to a community, including marginalized artists. We are all flawed and capable of oppressing each other in this competitive environment. How do we open the doors to alleviate some of that competition? \n\nCan theatre companies who receive local, provincial, and federal public arts funding cast a wider net to find their talent? Open calls for auditions are not always so open; every community has examples of companies that hold auditions yet continually hire the same people. Leadership positions often draw from a similar pool of insiders, without much effort to consider new voices. Accessing a path to influential positions is nearly impossible for many multi-talented artists. \n\n**Imagine\u2026 taking chances on people.** \n\nI\u2019m reimagining a theatre community where our latent talents get a chance to blossom, where we look to the margins of ourselves and our community: actors can be dramaturges; designers can be producers. We can be fluid as theatre artists. We must allow for horizontal and vertical growth. An artist should be able to broaden their horizons as well as deepen their practice. Artists yearn to stretch. When we put ourselves or others in boxes, we kill the little opportunity for surprising new directions. We revert to the way something has always been done instead of fostering a spirit of pathfinding. \n\n![Napole\u00e3o at her directorial debut for The Lobbyists collective featured at the Chinook Series, for a piece called \"Threshold\". 2021. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-theatre\/screen-shot-2021-06-16-at-11_HJckE2.png)\n\nI\u2019m reimagining my artistic voice. I\u2019ve been moving towards directing, dramaturgy, advocacy and writing. As I challenge myself, I feed my creativity, which makes me a better artist, which enhances my ability to be of use, and the cycle continues. With a broader range of abilities, I have more to offer my colleagues, who reciprocate because they are on their own paths. Fostering meaningful growth in individuals can exponentially grow their ability to give back to a community. \n\nI\u2019m reimagining artistry on my terms. It\u2019s taken me years to unpack how I\u2019ve been conditioned away from the natural wonder, creativity, and curiosity that drives art. In expanding beyond my usual practice, I am finding my path. \n\nThis path necessitates supporting others along the way. As long as we have a shared space where we can meet and co-create, I think we will be ok. I will meet you there.\n\n*Cover image of Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\u2014photo credit: Brianne Jang (BB Photography) & April M. Killins*\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 12:47:57","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 11:16:57","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 10:56:37","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:10","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

恢复社区和剧院的工作场所

Natércia拿破仑文化日

2021年6月29日

In terms of race and representation, opera has a long way to go still. Opera InReach mentors and featured performers are diverse, meaning students are sure to see themselves on stage.\n\nAlong with physical accessibility via digital delivery, the materials relate opera to the world students know, including social justice and other relevant themes, and forms like spoken word. Opera and social issues are not strangers. Beethoven's Fidelio tells the story of a woman who disguises herself as a jail guard to rescue her husband from incarceration in a political prison. Pepper, who was a pop singer before taking on opera, points out differences between pop and opera singing techniques. \n\nYet, pointing out the connections brings opera closer to home. \u201cThey\u2019re already experienced in \u2018opera\u2019 even if they don\u2019t know it,\u201d says Perri Lo, Provincial Coordinator for British Columbia.\n\n\u201cFor students, they don\u2019t quibble about what is opera or not,\u201d Fajardo adds.\n\nAnother important aspect is future audience building. \u201cThat was a big part of our considerations,\u201d Agostino says.\n\n![Libydo and Kayla Ruiz. Photo courtesy of Opera InReach.](assets\/National\/blog\/opera-inreach\/1-libydokaylaruiz-1_w39az4.png)\n \n**The Details**\n\nAfter offering pilot presentations at a mix of middle and high schools, and the University of Toronto (where both Adridge and Pepper studied), the teams are busy preparing modules to present to school boards at the coming of the academic year in September 2021. The material will be flexible.\n\n\u201cIt\u2019s being aware, being sensitive to their curriculum,\u201d Lo says. \u201cIt\u2019s so different between provinces.\u201d\n\n\u201cWe\u2019re trying to find as many different ways of approaching it,\u201d says Elliott Harder, Provincial Coordinator for Alberta. That can also include other disciplines such as literature, science (looking at the physics of sound, for example,) and theatre. \u201cIt\u2019s not just music,\u201d he says. \u201cWe keep finding more avenues to do that.\u201d\n\nThe presentations last between 7 and 20 minutes, with some examples, and wrap up in activity, typically with on-site mentors to provide support. Future plans include one-on-one mentorships for any students who want to pursue any aspect of opera from singing to stage management.\n\nAs Kehler points out, it\u2019s not only about arts and culture \u2013 but to educate students on realistic future employment opportunities. \u201cHow can we work in the opera industry, but maybe not on the opera stage?\u201d \n\nFeedback from the pilot programmes has been very positive, with many students enthusiastic about the opportunity to discover something they never would have gotten to otherwise. \u201cWe were so pleasantly surprised by the response,\u201d Agostino says. \n\nIn the end, opera is a glorious art form with a bad rep. \u201cOpera has a big job to undo that perception,\u201d Adridge says. \u201cIt\u2019s opera\u2019s job to do that.\u201d\n\nPutting opera in reach of everyone sets up the art form in its rightful place. \u201cArt as a pillar of society,\u201d Adridge says. \u201c\\[It\u2019s] the ultimate vessel of creativity.\u201d\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:54","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 12:15:48","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 11:50:05","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:50","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

重新校准:看Opera Ineach

Anya Wassenberg培养日

2021年6月29日

As a Relaxed Performance Consultant, I help arts organizations to welcome members of the Disability Community to performances and spaces. And yes, a lot of the organizations I consult for are larger companies whose donors may have deeper pockets, but the people I work with aren\u2019t just ticking boxes - they want to make a real change in the arts scene in Canada. They want to re-imagine how to invite the Disability Community to participate in their work. \n\nI am often approached by smaller companies or individual artists asking how to make their work more inclusive, and honestly, small steps can be taken to begin that process. Steps that don\u2019t cost a lot, if anything at all. Erin told me that the Kingston Arts Council is \u201c\u2026making an effort to describe their photos (on social media)\u201d and, she shares, people are describing themselves in meetings. I agree. I\u2019ve noticed this myself over the last year. Prior to COVID the only meetings I attended where people gave visual descriptions of themselves (for members of the Blind and Low Vision communities) were those that were disability led. Now, it\u2019s more common\u2014at least in the arts. Emily Maxwell, Founder & Co-Director of Toronto\u2019s [The Disability Collective](https:\/\/www.thedisabilitycollective.com\/), echoes these thoughts. \u201cIt can sound like a lot and daunting, but small steps can be made until it becomes natural\u201d.\n\nIt\u2019s true, and something I always tell the people I work with. Start small, do what you can, but at the same time be honest with your community about what you are able to offer as well as what you aren\u2019t. So if you can keep the house lights at 30% and lower sound cues to 90 decibels, but can\u2019t afford an ASL\/LSQ interpreter or Audio Description, tell your audiences. Manage their expectations so that they know exactly what they can access and what they can\u2019t. Give them all the information they need prior to purchasing a ticket so that they can fully engage and participate, or know that your limitations won\u2019t allow that at this time.\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts\/f18a463c-2ef7-4e82-91ed-b29c8efcb091-original-min_ie6858.jpg)\nImage Description: Emily and Nathan are standing in a green field surrounded by grass and trees. They are leaning forward against a chain link fence and looking over the fence towards the left of the photo. Emily, a young white woman with red hair and blue eyes, is standing on the left of the photo with her arms on top of the fence. Nathan, a young white man with brown hair and blue eyes, is standing on the right of the photo with his left arm on top of the fence. They are both wearing blue denim jackets. Both have thoughtful expressions on their faces.\n\nDoes inclusion and accessibility stop at front of house? It shouldn\u2019t. What are we doing to \u201cshowcase human beings in all of their diverse beauty\u201d\u2014 a gorgeous thought by Nathan Sartore, Co-Director of The Disability Collective, a new company out of Toronto that promotes and showcases art by Disabled Artists. Art should \u201clook like what people look like\u201d, Nathan expands. \u201cAnd real people backstage too,\u201d Emily adds. Yes! As a former Stage Manager with on-again off-again mobility issues, I completely agree. How often have I arrived at a venue to find the booth inaccessible? More times than I\u2019d like to admit. And what about stage steps? How do artists who use mobility devices access a stage that doesn\u2019t have an elevator or ramp? Laura Cusack, Founder and Executive Director of the [Hummingbird Hub](https:\/\/www.hummingbirdhub.org\/) in downtown, historical Stouffville, found a way. \u201cCulture is the heart of a community. To get a community to bond, and make an impact as we grow we need to focus on the cultural arts\u201d. And that focus is brought about by their Accessible Open Mic Night. Most open mics, as we know, take place in pubs and bars that usually have stairs or aren\u2019t very inclusive. So how did a community centre in a century-old building become the centre for inclusivity in Stouffville? By engaging with their audience and community\u2014a thought echoed by each of the people I spoke with.\n\n> Ask your community what they need in order to participate. Engage in dialogue with the Disability Community and listen, without preconceived ideas, but with an open heart and mind, and a desire to breakdown barriers and include everyone. \n\n[Cassie-Hope Aubin](https:\/\/www.cassiehopeaubin.com\/), Deaf Theatre Artist, shares \u201cWe see diversity happening, which is amazing, but disability is often excluded or the at the bottom of the list.\u201d As a musical theatre performer Cassie-Hope has \u201cbeen in shows that weren\u2019t accessible, so I wouldn\u2019t have even been able to see my own show.\u201d\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts\/page-3-image-3_fvRC7l.png)\nImage Description: Taylor, a singer-songwriter in a wheelchair, wears a white t-shirt and performs at the Hummingbird Hub\u2019s Accessible Open Mic Night. A microphone on a black stand is in front of Taylor. His father, Mike, is on the right of the photo holding a guitar and wearing a green and white baseball-style shirt. A green and gold sign with \u201cHummingbird Hub\u201d and the web address is on a white wall behind them.\n\nIt\u2019s time for a change. Time to reimagine how we present, access, and create art. It\u2019s time to relax not only performances, but also processes. Reach out to the d\/Deaf and Disability communities, ask what they need to be included both onstage and off, engage disabled creatives, bring their voices to the stage and share their stories in open and honest ways. This is an exciting time of reflection. We are being allowed time to think about how we want to move forward\u2014and it\u2019s time to include every voice in that discussion.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:13","first_published_at":"2021-06-23 11:06:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 13:19:19","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:28","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

reimagine-残疾社区如何访问艺术

文化日的rachel标志

2021年6月29日

I was taking care of my neighbours instead of the audience, and I was looking out for their budget instead of their evening of entertainment. But, it felt good. I told myself that like doing a show, any day where I promptly answered our property manager\u2019s emails was a good day.\n\nThe Board was a start, but it hardly covered the time I normally spent working on my in-town shows, let alone being on the road. I still faced a lot of days where I couldn't conceive of a reason to exist in the world. I also needed to replace the money I wasn't getting from performing.\n\nSo, I started selling Pok\u00e9mon.\n\nThanks to news-worthy current events such as COVID-19 and civil unrest, you probably missed the story about Pok\u00e9mon cards. I heard, by fluke, how the trend of \u201cripping\u201d (opening) packs on one's Livestream was sending the value of particular sets parabolic. I won't bore you with (or reveal) the details of how I identified a bulk, legal, supply of those sets, but I will tell you that I knew if I sold at market value I stood to double my money. However, it could take up to $10,000 to corner the market\u2014a market some might argue was roughly as solid as dogecoin.\n\nI shrugged and said, \u201cYou gotta catch 'em all.\u201d\n\nIt was a gamble, but with demand outpacing supply, all it took was some Kijiji and Facebook Marketplace ads to become the Walter White of Pok\u00e9mon in my city. In a time when collectors struggled to find 5-packs at retail, I'd show up to sales with Ziploc baggies filled with hundreds of cards at reasonable prices. Their eyes bulged, as if I actually held pocket monsters with elemental powers in my hands. By my third week selling I met a customer who already knew me by reputation.\n\n\u201cYou sold to Tony's crew didn't you?\u201d he said, his eyes locked onto the $500 of product I was unloading onto his centre console. \u201cI knew it, man... because when I saw those Ziploc baggies... I thought, 'this is the guy'...\u201d I'd become Heisenberg, the man with the Blue Ziplocs.\n\nIt took work; negotiating and selling the packs, sometimes $20 at a time, sometimes $2,500. It took three months of hustling only to reach break-even. I didn't mind. To quote Bryan Cranston's character: I liked it. I was good at it. Ringing the bell at the Pok\u00e9mon-sales office felt almost as good as doing a set. Ok, it didn't feel nearly as \u201cgood\u201d, but it did feel as \u201cpurposeful\u201d. The hustle to find enough stage time is the same that got me out of bed at 6:00 am to drive across the city to close a huge sale (I learned quickly that you meet when the customer wants to, otherwise they might come to their senses).\n\nPre-COVID, I ran a regular show at the same address since April 2010. I'm the second longest-running stand-up show and host in Canada (the first being Calgary's Comedy Mondays started by legendary James Moore). In 2018, I started bringing in headliners to do the room and expanded from Thursday nights to weekend shows.\n\nIt was something I took on spontaneously, but it started me on a path. Most comics hate producing or are bad at it (often both). I knew I'd rather run my own show, the way I thought it should be run, than wait around for someone to offer me stage time at a strip club at 5:00 pm (actually not the worst gig I did early on). I'd show up early every week to set up the room which was normally configured for music; moving 52 chairs, 12 tables, lighting candles and setting the lights to get the right ambience. I'd give my all to warming up the crowd at the start of every show, and after acts sometimes bombed. The comedy gods rewarded me with full audiences that appreciated the comedy club feel.\n\nThanks to producing my own show, I was very privileged to have an outlet where I could always invest my time and feel like I had a purpose. The downside of getting to focus only on comedy for the last decade is I only ever focused on comedy.\n\nBetween March 2020 and March 2021, I realized I don't have a purpose; one thing I'm meant to do. I choose a new purpose every day\u2014a goal or action I\u2019m going to make happen through deliberate, purposeful effort. Ideally that purpose is getting in front of crowds, but it doesn't have to be. I'm a great Board member. I like making things happen and looking out for the interest of the group. And, I like finding an angle and hustling as I did with the Pok\u00e9mon. \n\n![Green performing stand-up on stage. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/repurpose\/mike-chucks2-1_qaROg4.jpg)\n\nWhen I get back to stand-up, I don't expect to stop doing either of those things. I see the opportunity to bring all these skills together: I want to run stand-up classes and workshops on how to produce shows so I can help new comics in my city the same way I took on responsibility and cared for everyone in my building. \n\nThe Pok\u00e9mon hustle showed me what happens when I fully commit, and made me think about the way I was approaching comedy. I was often going half way; bringing in a headliner for 2 nights of shows instead of 5, or occasionally posting short clips instead of consistently producing regular online content. If I can bet on myself the same way I did when I cornered the market I'll be excited to see how my stand-up evolves (ideally from a Charmeleon to a Charizard).\n\nIf you're an artist who feels like you lost your identity because COVID-19 took away your ability to perform as you normally would, look at it as an opportunity to reimagine your craft and engage with your audience\u2014perhaps even a new crowd or community\u2014in a different way. You don't need to _serve one purpose_, but rather use everything you\u2019ve got and everything you do to _create on purpose_.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:37:48","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 14:11:31","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 14:01:11","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:03","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":"2021-07-26 13:25:12","is_featured":true,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

回复:目的

迈克绿色文化日

2021年6月29日

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund.\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-14 11:45:17","first_published_at":"2021-06-14 11:37:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-14 11:28:11","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:38:57","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

道路较少旅行:三位艺术家重新想象成功和职业生涯

Linh S.nguyễn文化日

2021年6月14日

Exhibiting my work has proven to be a great tactic (ice breaker), when inviting members of the public to participate in open dialogues, whether it be about art or more pressing matters such as activism or the current social climate. This includes connecting with new artists, reaching out to members of the community as well as other like-minded creators, all coming together for a common cause.\n\nDue to the restrictions caused by the pandemic, social media has become a primary source and powerful platform with few limitations when connecting to a wide range of audiences. This can be a pleasant form of communication, offering the opportunity to cultivate alternative perspectives or critiques between individuals that are keen on pushing boundaries on every level, granting me the opportunity to provide more insight into my goals as a creator and activist.\n\nI highlight the importance of strength in unity, for example, reflecting on moments within the George Floyd protests when white protestors created physical barriers between Black protesters and law enforcement, chanting \u201cBlack Lives Matter\u201d. This gesture alone signified that the first step to becoming an advocate is acknowledgment. Acknowledgment of the global issues surrounding race, colourism, State violence against minorities, or the social inequality that has shattered communities for decades, while being open to having uncomfortable discussions that can lead to necessary, massive changes within our communities. Acknowledgment is an active pillar to every conversation regarding race and the first step to becoming an advocate.\n\nIn conclusion, an advocate should not wait to be invited to the conversation. The conversation has been active throughout history and will continue far into the future. Simply pull up a chair at the table and jump right into the discussion, there\u2019s plenty of room.\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/make-room-for-alia-peoples\/thumbnail-image3-2_Puv0Uw.jpg){.pull .right}\n\n**How has the role of community (however you choose to define \u2018community\u2019) impacted your arts practice?**\n\nMy community has acted as a support system throughout my career as a creator, encouraging my artistic drive, passion towards developing meaningful creations and self-expression, no matter the direction or manner I choose to conduct them in. It\u2019s the safety net that allows me to freely convey my truths without fear of judgment or non-acceptance by others.\n\nCommunity is a source of inspiration that has impacted my life in many ways. For example, I love engaging in enlightening conversations with strong female friends, who collectively support one another and encourage me to always speak my truth, no matter the outcome. I\u2019m also inspired by my family members, such as my brother and role model, Mohammed G\u00f6ess Peoples. Mohammed's form of creative expression in giving back to the community was to establish a BLM Zoom platform along with his friend and co-founder, Ikram Aslam. It serves as a safe space for members to share everyday experiences regarding race that have affected them personally and work together towards achieving social reform. Guest speakers from various educational backgrounds, including psychology, join the discussions and shed light on urgent topics such as maintaining mental health during the pandemic and much more. \n\n**What\u2019s next for you creatively?**\n\nCreatively speaking, I plan to place more energy into larger-scaled projects. As a child I found myself sticking to small but detailed doodles due to an inward discomfort or unease with being in my own skin. Over time my artwork has evolved from shy and polite to loud and confident and continues to grow. I\u2019m eager and looking forward to showcasing more of my work in the near future.\n\n**Where can people go to see what you\u2019re working on and keep up with your creative output?**\n\nInstagram: [@Aliagpeoplesart](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/aliagpeoplesart\/?hl=en)\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special series shouting-out new or rising artists creatives, and\/or collectives from across the country that should be on your radar. Explore more profiles below:**\n- [Make Room For... Creato](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/make-room-for-creato)\n- [Make Room For... Desmond Tompkins](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/make-room-for-desmond-tompkins)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-04-19 10:31:12","first_published_at":"2021-04-16 15:22:56","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-04-14 11:45:10","updated_at":"2021-04-22 09:59:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

腾出空间...... Alia G. Peoples

文化日x alia g.民族

2021年4月19日

I believe that our role is to continue pushing boundaries within the art world, and utilize what privilege we do have to uplift the voices of our peers.\n\n![\"Callisto\", 2019, abstract painting. Courtesy of the artist. ](assets\/National\/blog\/make-room-for-desmond-tompkins\/picture6_s8A31F.png)\n\n**What\u2019s next for you creatively?** \n\nI plan on pursuing formal arts education, and utilizing my degree to become an arts teacher for alternative high school programs. Along with this I hope to continue cultivating my arts practice, and remain active in the arts and culture community through working on new arts opportunities for young artists to have their voices heard.\n\n**Where can people go to keep up with your art projects and creative output?**\n\nMy virtual portfolio can be found on my Instagram [@dezzmonndd](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/dezzmonndd\/?hl=en) and I can be reached through my email for inquiries.\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special series shouting-out new or rising artists creatives, and\/or collectives from across the country that should be on your radar. Explore more profiles below:**\n- [Make Room For... Creato](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/make-room-for-creato)\n- [Make Room For... Alia G. Peoples](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/make-room-for-alia-g-peoples)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-03-15 10:21:12","first_published_at":"2021-03-11 22:49:51","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-03-11 22:44:36","updated_at":"2021-04-19 21:45:40","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

腾出空间...... Desmond Tompkins

文化日x Desmond Tompkins

3月15日,2021年3月15日

As Latinx creatives in the arts and culture sector, we often experience social, individual, and collective barriers that follow us as we live, work, and create in Canada. Language and other cross-cultural barriers, harmful concepts around tokenism and stereotyping, and disproportionate access to resources are found at every corner of the art world and creative industries. Yet, as artists, we look for ways to challenge these concepts through creativity, resilience, and by making space for our individual, collective and multi-generational self-representation.\n\nBeing Latinx and creating in Canada means being influenced by vibrant flavours, colours, stories, and finding ways to bring them into foreign spaces. It means constantly asking yourself _Where do I belong? Where is home? Can I ever truly be part of, and embrace, my heritage? How?_ It sometimes means cooking food that reminds you of family and home because you need a warm embrace. It means looking for others who ask the same questions. It means finding unity in a commitment to make Latinx creative voices loud, and our multiple and intersectional identities seen. \n\n**How are you building community amidst the pandemic?**\n\nBuilding community during these times has been both a challenge and an opportunity to get creative. Given that Creato emerged in\u2014and greatly because of\u2014the pandemic, we have experimented so far with all virtual community-building initiatives. \n\nAt the moment, we mostly communicate through the online messaging platform Slack in order to connect and get to know each other. We have a wide range of channels within Slack so we talk about everything from job opportunities, events, and resources to sharing recipes, memes, or the latest Bad Bunny drop. It really is a space that a lot of us were missing in our lives and has become the center of where our community is connecting. \n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/make-room-for-creato\/creato-banner-tweet_mmhcTl.png)\n\n**Tell us about some of the events and\/or initiatives you\u2019ve put together so far.**\n\nApart from our Slack community, which really has been the nucleus for engagement, we organize virtual hangouts every 2 weeks where anyone is welcome to join. Each and every hangout has left us with a huge smile on our faces and our hearts totally full. The calls started as a way to simply put faces to those taking part in online discussions, and now we\u2019ve been setting themes for the calls to help prompt deeper conversations and sharing resources or experiences. We like to say that these hangouts are go-with-the-flow-type of vibe, where we end up revealing weirdness, vulnerabilities, and hilarious stories. Friendships and bonds have formed instantly, and even though we can't wait to do it in person, these calls have been an amazing way to connect with each other.\n\nA huge part of Creato\u2019s mission is to give Latinx creatives in Canada more visibility. Currently, there are very few places where you can find or discover the great talent within our communities, so we are using [Instagram](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/crea_to_\/) to feature artists on a regular basis; who they are, what they\u2019re about, and samples of their work. Go check them out, they will blow your mind! \n\nWe also have a firm belief that creators in our community don't only need to be seen, but paid. With this in mind, we created a holiday market or \u201cMercadito\u201d guide on Instagram, featuring artists that have beautiful creations for sale. We plan to do more of these in the future on a bigger scale. \n\n**What has surprised or delighted you most about Creato?**\n\nThis whole journey has been a surprise for me. The support and response from the community have been incredible and the constant reassurance that this space is needed is really our biggest motivation\u2014people are excited and happy to help this community grow! So many have found comfort and support with Creato, both on a personal and professional level. There are a number of people in our community who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic, others who are newcomers or even students still in or fresh out of school, and we are all doing our part in giving advice or opening doors when possible. We\u2019ve also felt an amazing sense of belonging and connection in the little things like sharing music, recipes, and anecdotes that connect us to each of our roots. \n\nPersonally, this has brought an immense sense of self-worth and purpose that I hadn't felt in a very long time. I love what I do for work, but when your 9 to 5 is the only creative work you\u2019re producing, it\u2019s easy to forget that you are worth more than just your job\u2014which can be pretty deflating at times. Building Creato has been that thing I\u2019ve been searching for without knowing. It\u2019s the intersection of 3 things I\u2019m so deeply passionate about: creativity, community work, and my Latinx identity, and I couldn't be more proud and happy spending my 5 to 9 on this.\n\n**What\u2019s up next for Creato? What goals do you hope to see the group accomplish in the future?**\n\nCreato\u2019s future is looking bright and powerful, just like our gente. As we\u2019ve said, we are a growing community, so self-discovery and ongoing development are crucial for us. We have been working on new community-driven programs, campaigns, and events with the goal of providing tools and learning opportunities to Latinx creatives so they can fully express their creative voices, challenge dominant culture, and maintain a sustainable and rewarding arts practice. We dream to one day have a physical space where artists, creative entrepreneurs, and any Latinx creator can showcase their work. However, for now, we have a very exciting virtual line-up for the year! \n\nIn line with our mission to build on Latinx self-visibility in the arts, we are developing a Latinx Directory of Creatives in Canada - an online database featuring creatives from across disciplines who identify as Latinx \/ Latine. We hope the directory will make collaboration amongst creatives more accessible while shedding light on the work Latinx creatives across Canada do. \n\nWe\u2019ll be launching a mentorship program later in the year with the hopes of better supporting emerging youth artists with arts entrepreneurship tools as they begin their professional arts practices. We also have a very special event lined up for Latinx heritage month (wink wink, October). We don\u2019t want to reveal too much right now but stay tuned for details \u2018cause it's going to be lively and of course, uniquely Latinx. \n\n**Where can other Latinx creatives in Canada find you?**\n\n[Crea-to.com](https:\/\/www.crea-to.com\/) where you can sign up for our upcoming newsletters, our Instagram [@crea_to_](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/crea_to_\/) or you can always drop us a line at .\n\n_Acknowledgment:_ \nAs a Latinx community made up of distinct cultures shaped by complex historical relations of power, we are in the process of learning more about how we can acknowledge the historical oppression of lands, cultures, and Peoples, as we are committed to challenging the legacies of colonialism. We are forever grateful to be able to create and build community across Indigenous territories in the land that we now know as Canada. Creato is based in the city now known as Toronto, but remains Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit, and the traditional territory of many peoples and nations including the Anishinabeg, the Haudenosaunee, and the Wendat peoples.\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special series shouting-out new or rising artists creatives, and\/or collectives from across the country that should be on your radar. Explore more profiles below:**\n- [Make Room For... Desmond Tompkins](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/make-room-for-desmond-tompkins)\n- [Make Room For... Alia G. Peoples](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/make-room-for-alia-g-peoples)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-02-16 10:46:22","first_published_at":"2021-02-12 15:18:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-02-12 15:11:04","updated_at":"2021-04-19 21:46:59","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

腾出空间...疯狂

文化日X Fiorella Martinez

2021年2月16日

进入过程(第2部分,共5部分):Bambi

Tamar Tabori.

2020年9月21日

As the Coronavirus restrictions gradually settled over my life in mid-March and my regular book club was put on hiatus, I found myself craving an arts-focused connection...\n\nAs the minutes tick towards 7pm, my computer is perched precariously on a stack of books while pages of discussion prompts lie on the desk underneath a dog-eared copy of our May book choice. The Facebook video interface is poised for recording; all I have to do now is hit the \u2018Go Live\u2019 button to begin our meeting. The 7pm MST beginning is late for some of our members in eastern Canada, but the promise of a satisfying deconstruction of our latest read is enough to pull people back to their devices at this hour. Once I begin the recording there is little preamble, I pause only to thank people for joining before I jump right into the discussion. After the requisite 40 second delay in the video feed, comments begin pouring in: a whole month\u2019s worth of observations scrolling down the screen.\n\nThere are two different kinds of book clubs. The first is an informal gathering of friends, eager to indulge in some libations and friendly gossip with some limited book talk thrown in. The second is a formal club with a regular meeting time, specific book choices voted on in advance and a discussion focused solely on the chosen reading material. Quite often the latter is made up of strangers, brought together over a love of the written word and a desire to meet like-minded people. Now, while in-person gatherings are on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, attention is shifting to online groups as an accessible and efficient way of connecting those with similar interests.\n\n![Anne leading a discussion during an Ivereadthis Online Book Club meeting.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/img-1017-1_EkDI7C.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nAs the Coronavirus restrictions gradually settled over my life in mid-March and my regular book club was put on hiatus, I found myself craving an arts-focused connection. As a critic I\u2019m lucky enough to have books mailed directly to my home, so I invited fellow bookworms to join me in reading through my collection by starting the [Ivereadthis Online Book Club](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/groups\/ivereadthisonlinebookclub\/). The Club is a free and public Facebook group, connecting once a month over live video chats which allow for real-time discussion with an unlimited number of participants. As I write this our group includes over 200 members, but after only two meetings it is clear who will actively participate in our video chats and who is content to hover on the sidelines, popping in and out for book recommendations.\n\nFace-to-face interactions ensure a certain level of decorum is upheld while online discussions can easily devolve into bickering. As the group moderator I was mildly concerned that our conversations may become offensive, or worse, trolled by people looking to stir up pointless controversy. To avoid this, I decided our group would focus on works of fiction which allow people to voice opinions on issues external to their own lives, but relevant all the same. For example, character motivations are a frequent topic of discussion; why did someone act that way, were they justified in lashing out, what would you have done in the same situation? Criticizing the actions of a character tends to incite less controversy, keeping the tone of our discussions light and entertaining regardless of the dark subject matter the chosen books may address. \n\n![Photo courtesy of Vlada Karpovish.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/vlada-karpovich_5ex6dE.jpeg){.pull}\n\nDespite the ease of voicing one\u2019s thoughts to strangers across the country in sweatpants, there are obvious downsides to staying solely online. Fran Kimmel, a writer and book club veteran points out: \u201cwhen online I might not try quite as hard to get my point across or to understand other people\u2019s points. There\u2019s the added layer of technology separating you from others, and all those emotional intelligence cues we get through body language are stripped away. But I\u2019m also hopeful that this is a learned skill, and the more we meet online, the better we\u2019ll become at sharing deeply.\u201d \n\nThe only distinguishing factor of each group member is their thumbnail-sized picture, so there is a distinct lack of background information to base judgements on. If someone voices an opinion that you vehemently disagree with at an in-person meeting, you are likely to fall back on their body language and tone of voice to help justify their comment. Online we can only go by a person\u2019s text-based contributions\u2014so although it seems easier to participate in a virtual chat, our words hold more weight than usual. Readers are especially aware of how important word choice can be, so thankfully our conversations have remained respectful and empathetic, even during disagreements. \n\nAs the organizer, my one question that looms above all others is the likelihood this club will continue. COVID-19 has not only shifted the way we currently interact with others, it has altered the way we imagine our future communications; the ease in which we have shifted our events online demonstrates this new way of meeting can continue even when moving restrictions have lifted. And even if the membership of the Ivereadthis Online Book Club slowly dwindles once life returns to normal, members now see the benefits to joining other public clubs like this in the future. One of the group\u2019s members, Jolena, confirms this newly discovered interest is one she\u2019ll continue with: \u201cI would join another book club, it was a great experience to be able to discuss a topic among peers.\u201d Knowing our members feel this way is incredibly validating\u2014the cultural richness of literature is a wonderful gift to share with others, especially with those you never would have met otherwise.\n\n![Photo courtesy of Parth Shah.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/parth-shah_Kvywu1.jpeg){.overflow}\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [Chinatown's Living Room: _The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-09-02 10:10:02","first_published_at":"2020-06-10 12:38:44","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-10 12:38:07","updated_at":"2020-09-02 10:10:02","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

陌生人和小说

安妮洛根文化日

2020年9月2日

Early on I must have seemed like some ultra-persistent grade school child to staff at the Canadian Light Source, which in some ways isn\u2019t that far off, I try to keep in touch with that curious grade 5-6 kid as part of my art practice. \n\nIn 2016, Fransaskois new media artist and sculptor, [Jean-S\u00e9bastien Gauthier](https:\/\/jsgauthier.com\/) (hereinafter referred to as \"JS\"), signed up for a tour of the [Canadian Light Source](https:\/\/www.lightsource.ca\/) (CLS)...and then another, and another...until he was convinced he wanted to make art using the CLS. \n\nThe CLS is a national research facility, one of the largest science projects in our country\u2019s history, producing the brightest light in Canada\u2014millions of times brighter than even the sun\u2014used by more than 1,000 scientists from around the world every year in ground-breaking health, environmental, materials, and agricultural research.\n\n![Digital render mixing 3D scans, CT scans and 3D synchrotron radiation microCT data (2017).](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-scientist-light\/6-sample-and-hold_rBIGyc.jpeg){.small}\n\nThe synchrotron operates by accelerating streams of electrons to 99.99 per cent of the speed of light, fast enough to reach the moon in 1.3 seconds. Giant magnets bend the electron beam, creating a light millions of times brighter than the sun. When directed down beamlines, that light enables scientists to do analysis of physical samples such as plants and engine oil that is more detailed than with any other process, as well as to create images of structures at the molecular level.\n\nTo gain entry to this very exclusive instrument (there are only 40 synchrontons in the world and only one in Canada) JS realized he needed a partner, someone with inside access. He wrote a call for collaborators that was published in the CLS newsletter. Somewhat surprisingly he received numerous replies, but Dr. Brian Eames' response stood out.\n\n[Dr. Brian Eames](http:\/\/eameslab.ca\/) is a researcher at the University of Saskatchewan, College of Medicine, in the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, who uses the CLS, imaging techniques, and molecular approaches to study how cells turn into bone and cartilage. \n\nAll it took was one meeting over coffee, where they shared concepts on evolutionary biology and spitballed ideas for using the synchrotron to explore evolution, and they knew they could develop an exceptional collaboration. JS regularly visited Brian\u2019s lab where they continuously discussed intersecting interests and possibilities. Based on their talks, JS drafted grant applications, one of which was accepted by Canada Council for the Arts.\n\n![JS and Dr. Brian Eames looking over the synchrotron.](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-scientist-light\/bio-image-brian-js-1_n0UA3B.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nSince 2017 JS has served as the Artist-in-residence at the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, at the University of Saskatchewan and facilities of the CLS synchrotron. No other artist has been granted research time at the CLS with artistic inquiry and aesthetic experimentation as the primary objective. \n\n> Art and science are natural collaborators. In the same way that art alters a perspective, or provides an unexpected revelation, so does science...\n\nCutting-edge 3D synchrotron radiation imaging techniques were used to create an immersive video installation, [_Dans la Mesure\/Within Measure_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/235157911), which explores developmental biology, evolution, and the complex unity between humans and other life forms (specifically zebrafish, tiny and robust model organisms often used in genetic medical research.) \n\nAnd their collaboration continues. In 2019, JS and Brian created an interactive piece for Nuit Blanche (which was shown at the U of S campus and downtown Saskatoon.) [_Our Glass_](https:\/\/jsgauthier.com\/our-glass) engages viewers of all ages to peer within an hourglass, showing how embryonic development compares among animals with whom we share a close genetic heritage. \n\n![_Still Life_ (after Ernst Haeckel), JS Gauthier, 2017.](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-scientist-light\/04-xrayhaekel-jsg-2017-5x7-72-1-copy_SjYQ87.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nJeff Cutler, past CLS Chief Strategic Relations officer had this to say, \u201cArt and science are natural collaborators. In the same way that art alters a perspective, or provides an unexpected revelation, so does science. Researchers from around the world come to our light source in order to see things differently, and their findings often change how we look at the world. It\u2019s this search for a new way of seeing things that brings art and science together, and that\u2019s why it\u2019s important for us to work with artists like JS. Not only does his work introduce the CLS to a new audience, but he has also challenged us to see our own work differently.\u201d\n\nStay tuned for more as JS continues to redefine contemporary art practices through research, technology, and building bridges across disciplines and people... he recently bought a VR (virtual reality) helmet!\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [Chinatown's Living Room: _The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-08-18 14:11:09","first_published_at":"2020-06-10 16:39:35","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-10 16:24:34","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:26:18","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

当你混合艺术家,科学家和一个非常明亮的光线时会发生什么?

vivian orr文化日

2020年8月18日

Building a boat is a process of thinking, knowing, and doing\u2014of learning and creating, which are the two most important of all human activities. It is not a single big job; it is a thousand little jobs, some of them done over and over and over.\n\n![Getting the hang of things (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture2_fFcp3r.png){.overflow}\n\nDay 1 is over before you know it, and everyone goes home a little sore, but satisfied to see their boat taking shape. By Day 2, with the exterior of the rowboat complete, the builders add the interior frames, seat risers, and seats. In between the major steps there is always more planing, sanding, and tweaking to do to prepare for the big launch on Day 3.\n\nSituated on the boardwalk in the heart of the busy Halifax waterfront, the [Maritime Museum of the Atlantic (MMA)](https:\/\/maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca\/) was searching for a way to open up the doors of its boatshop and become a community anchor. They found it through the unexpected intersection of traditional craftsmanship and youth outreach. \n\n![The museum is at the heart of the Halifax waterfront (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture3_A544gz.png){.overflow}\n\nInspired by the Family Boatbuilding concept introduced in WoodenBoat Magazine in 1998, the MMA\u2019s program is simple: gather a few \u2018families\u2019\u2014whether bound by blood or simply friendship\u2014give each group a kit of pieces for a 12-foot rowboat, and help them put the pieces together in three days. Family Boatbuilding spreads wooden boatbuilding to a wider audience and keep the craft alive and vital.[^note1]\n\n![All hands on deck (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture4_iqT9b5.png){.overflow}\n\nThe [Alexandria Seaport Foundation](https:\/\/alexandriaseaport.org\/), in particular, ran with this idea. They introduced an element of social action, training and employing at-risk youth as apprentices. In the process, they also raised the profile of the movement, publishing Bevin\u2019s Skiff plans for other institutions to use for their own events.[^note2] This is where the MMA found their direct inspiration, and they are not alone. Similar programs have sprung up throughout the Eastern Seaboard and along the West Coast, independently run by an eclectic collection of museums, historical societies, boatyards, and community non-profits.[^note3]\n\nThe MMA built its first two boats in 2014. The next year, three. Then, four. Now, it runs the program multiple times a year in partnership with Mount Saint Vincent University\u2019s Child and Youth Studies program.[^note4]\n\n![In June 2018, Eamonn Doorly the master boatbuilder from the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax, led a boat building workshop with students from Pictou Landing First Nation](https:\/\/youtu.be\/7EsIdJwNDKY)\n\nEvery time the MMA runs the program, the excitement on Day 3 feels fresh. By midday, the last quarter knee has been sanded, and each boat christened and ready to launch. Everyone gathers on the floating dock, poised to push their boats into Halifax harbour. They seem a long way from the Day 1 version of themselves. At first, they were reluctant to jump in with hammer in hand, afraid of making mistakes. They soon realized that, in itself, was a mistake. Here, mistakes are celebrated instead of frowned upon\u2014they\u2019re the best teachers. \n\n![Launch day as Theodore the Tugboat looks on (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture5_TxOoWY.png){.overflow}\n\nThe participants now know how to sand, plane, use a bevel gauge, build upside down, and drill straight. They can also translate angles, apply boatbuilding math, tell the difference between types of wood, and identify a transom or a seat riser. Above all, they\u2019ve absorbed craftsmanship as a concept\u2014what Richard Sennet called \u201cthe desire to do a job well for its own sake.\u201d[^note5] And no one is breaking drill bits anymore.\n\nThe MMA\u2019s Building Boats, Changing Lives program is building capacity in practical building skills, traditional wooden boatbuilding, and heritage craft. But they are doing much more than that.\n\nFirst, they\u2019re building up and empowering youth. Through something as subtle as hammering a nail, they\u2019re connecting youth to identity and belonging, through shared Maritime heritage. The type of boat commonly built during Family Boatbuilding, a flat-bottomed skiff, \u201ccan be found anywhere in the Atlantic provinces, not to mention anywhere in the world\u201d and has been historically indispensable for the inshore fishery.[^note6] Amateur and professional boatbuilders alike have built versions of it for centuries in North America.[^note7] These newest boatbuilders coming out of the MMA join a long line of those who have come before. They now have an elemental connection to boatbuilding heritage by literally making that heritage their own.\n\n![The latest links in a long line of wooden boatbuilding tradition (Photo: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic).](assets\/National\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives\/picture6_BfnHfe.png){.overflow}\n\nSecond, and finally, the MMA is building a culture of craftsmanship\u2014one boat and one boatbuilder at a time. It\u2019s a culture that values patience, hard work, the impulse to preserve and honour the past, and good old-fashioned gumption in the face of mistakes.\n\nNova Scotia sailor, boatbuilder, and writer, Silver Donald Cameron once said, \u201cBuilding a boat is a process of thinking, knowing, and doing\u2014of learning and creating, which are the two most important of all human activities. It is not a single big job; it is a thousand little jobs, some of them done over and over and over.\u201d[^note8] The MMA teaches everyone who picks up a hammer or a drill during its program that boatbuilding \u2013 like life \u2013 is just a constant process of fixing our mistakes. While we do not live in an ideal world, we can continue to try and make it one.\n\n[^note1]: The WoodenBoat Show, \u201cFamily Boatbuilding,\u201d WoodenBoat Magazine, accessed May 1, 2020, https:\/\/thewoodenboatshow.com\/family-boatbuilding\/.\n[^note2]: \u201cFutures Handcrafted: About the Apprentice Program,\u201d Alexandria Seaport Foundation, accessed May 1, 2020, https:\/\/alexandriaseaport.org\/apprentice-program\/; \u201cBevin\u2019s Skiff,\u201d Alexandria Seaport Foundation, accessed May 1, 2020, https:\/\/alexandriaseaport.org\/get-engaged\/bevins-skiff\/.\n[^note3]: Some include the Antique Boat Museum in Thousand Islands, New York; the Reedville Fisherman\u2019s Museum in Reedville, Virgina; the Deltaville Maritime Museum in Deltaville, Virginia; the Lewes Historical Society in Lewes, Delaware; TSNE Mission Works in Boston, Massachusetts; the University of New Hampshire in Barrington, New Hampshire; and Eddon Boatyard in Gig Harbour, Washington.\n[^note4]: I helped out with the MMA\u2019s program in 2015 and 2016, helping to build the kits and serving as a small group leader.\n[^note5]: Richard Sennett, The Craftsman (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008), 9.\n[^note6]: David A. Walker and Wayne Barrett, Small Wooden Boats of the Atlantic (Halifax: Nimbus Publishing, 1990), 10. \n[^note7]: Howard I. Chapelle, American Small Sailing Craft: Their Design, Development, and Construction (New York: W. W. Norton, 1951), 100.\n[^note8]: Silver Donald Cameron, \u201cThe Nine-Year Seminar on Boatbuilding and Life,\u201d in We Belong to the Sea: A Nova Scotia Anthology, ed. Mary Stanton (Halifax, N.S.: Nimbus Publishing, 2001), 88.\n\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown's Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-08-05 09:57:42","first_published_at":"2020-06-15 08:59:15","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-15 08:40:58","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:26:05","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

在大西洋的海事博物馆,他们建立了更多的船只

Aleen Leigh Stanton为文化日

2020年8月5日

Tea Base is a curious community arts space tucked away in Tkaronto\/Toronto\u2019s Chinatown Centre Mall. Tea Base aims to make accessible space for intergenerational activists and artists who support social justice movements in and around Chinatown. Tea Base is a space that develops solidarity across marginalized groups through relationships, joy, and collaboration.\n\nOne of the first gatherings held at [Tea Base](https:\/\/www.myteabase.com\/) was a wholesome meal. Hot pot is a shared meal where family and friends prepare a variety of raw ingredients to mingle and cook around in a communal pot of boiling broth. The organizers asked their community to bring ingredients, as if the items themselves were a symbolic gesture for the guidance and insight each person offered. Everyone huddled around the pot, breaking the ice by talking about the food items they brought. Throughout the meal, questions like, \u201cWhat kind of programming do you want to see?\u201d and \u201cWhat are the needs we can use this space to address?\u201d were discussed as bellies filled up. This simple act of sharing and asking questions was the impetus of how Tea Base started and continues to be at the centre of their work.\n\n![Tea Base is a curious community arts space tucked away in Tkaronto\/Toronto\u2019s Chinatown Centre Mall. Photo credit: Jae Ng.](assets\/National\/blog\/tea-base\/mg-9439_bSV5iE.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nTea Base opened in January of 2019 and is predominantly run by queer, non-binary, East Asians. Co-owner\/Co-parent Hannia Cheng jokes, \u201cBeing gay and Asian? That\u2019s unheard of.\" Tea Base has become a hub for East and South-East Asians of all genders and sexualities to not only comfortably express themselves, but to also embrace their cultural roots and relate to their heritage. Hannia explains, \u201cOther than Unit 2, Tea Base is one of the only few DIY spaces left downtown that prioritize queer and racialized artists. The collective response we\u2019ve received shows the need for these types of spaces.\u201d \n\nAs Tea Base grows, they hope to create opportunities for more intergenerational relationships between artists and activists through participatory art-based, social, and cultural programming. Hannia describes the overall vibe as \u201cTake off your shoes, living room energy...\u201d, It\u2019s this intention of making space for people to share their stories and lived experiences that make the space feel so cozy, \u201c...Mahjong Monday is mostly an excuse to hang out once a week. The ideas and collaborations happen organically as a result of fostering trust with each other.\u201d Hannia notes, \u201cWe don\u2019t fit into normative capitalist notions of success, we\u2019re in it for the people.\u201d Most of their events are Pay-What-You-Can and sliding scale. Other in-house programming includes Macrame with Jade, Bitch & Stitch, Tea Base & Chill, Mother Tongue language caf\u00e9s, and even a Chinese fermentation tasting workshop with [Paocai Bio](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/paocaibio\/?hl=en). \n\n![Mahjong Mondays is by far Tea Base's most popular event. They play and teach from 3-8pm every Monday. Photo credit: Jae Ng.](assets\/National\/blog\/tea-base\/tb-optimized_MLBHh5.png){.overflow}\n\nWith a housing crisis upon the city, it\u2019s becoming evident that affordable spaces are nearly impossible to come by, pushing already marginalized communities further to the outskirts of Toronto. That\u2019s why Tea Base has also grown as a hub for local activism. Chinatown has long been the target of displacement gentrification by condo developers. Co-owner\/Co-parent, Florence Yee, emphasizes the importance of the connections made at Tea Base, \u201cThere\u2019s a larger commonality and interest in doing better for the neighbourhood. Fighting gentrification, all these housing and racial injustices, this young queer politically active space is cultivated well.\u201d Joining a longstanding legacy of Chinatown activist groups, a recent ad-hoc watchdog group, Friends of Chinatown Toronto (FOCT) was formed and is based out of Tea Base. Hannia shares, \u201cChinatown activists have been around forever, we want to learn from them and with them.\u201d \n\nHonouring the existing Chinatown community is part of Tea Base\u2019s mandate. \u201cArt spaces can be inadvertently gentrifying...\u201d says Co-creative Director, Chris Carriere, \u201c...It\u2019s exciting when someone who\u2019s [an] elder visits, or when people bring their kids in. It\u2019s easy for us to get 20-year-olds from the art scene, but when we connect to other generations, the intergenerational conversation shows we can be a space that is open [to all].\u201d In the spring of 2019, with a complete volunteer effort, Tea Base turned what was once a pile of bricks sitting in the mall\u2019s courtyard for 7 years into a garden called \u201cThe Anti-Displacement Rainbow Garden''. The courtyard became a thriving common area for the Kumon kids to play in the garden and for the seniors to play Chinese chess on the stage.\n\nCurrently in its second year of operation, Tea Base wants to leverage their platform to support and amplify other grassroots efforts. Policy Director, Jennifer Chan, offers, \u201cAs East Asians, we\u2019re now established as a diaspora\u2026we faced our challenges to get where we are, and \\[now] we need to lift others up.\u201d They hope to continue getting to know different collectives with an intention to build a truly Pan-Asian community arts ecosystem. \n\n![\u201cRelationships move at the speed of trust. Social movements move at the speed of relationships.\u201d - Jennifer Bailey. Photo credit: Jae Ng.](assets\/National\/blog\/tea-base\/mg-9600_5mk7ID.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nIn the midst of the pandemic, they\u2019ve had to reimagine what community engagement looks like. \u201cA lot of people are very isolated, not just in quarantine...people find stability and friendships at Tea Base \\[that] they can rely on,\" states Florence. Most recently, Tea Base wrapped up their 2020 Spring Camp, a series of four online events that gathered their community together for some quality digital connection, like a knot-making workshop and a town hall for example. They\u2019ve also written up their [Community Guidelines](https:\/\/www.myteabase.com\/community-guidelines) (with consultation from the town hall) for a safer space.\n\nPlans for the future are already in the works. \u201cComing out of Covid, we will need time and help to get things going,\u201d Chris asks for a call to action. Tea Base is open 3-4 times throughout the week with events usually on the weekend. You don\u2019t need to purchase anything to exist at Tea Base, genuine human-to-human conversation is enough. Florence suggests, \u201cJust show up! A lot of what we do is about presence, and being there. The small and big ways.\u201d\n\n[Tea Base](https:\/\/www.myteabase.com\/) updates their hours on a weekly basis every Monday via [Instagram](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/tea.base\/).\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-07-21 23:39:37","first_published_at":"2020-06-23 13:25:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-23 12:41:49","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:53","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

唐人街的起居室:崭露头角的活动家社区的聚会场所

安踏陈文化日

7月21日,2020年

_They know this River will still be here long after we have turned to nuclear dust and blown away, saith the river..._\n>> -_Beholden: A poem as long as the river_, Rita Wong and Fred Wah\n\nRolling from one valley to another, streaming across coarse contours, sometimes surrendering to the whims of winds and pouring rain, other times cutting through the rock-ribbed plains; rivers have always made the most enchanted neighbourhoods. A river\u2019s ample bosom has cradled pioneering civilizations and nurtured childhood memories. Its panoramic views have kindled weary eyes and inspired grandiose dreams, and through centuries its gentle ripples have concocted timeless fables of love and romance. By the virtue of their romantic allure, rivers have always been a recurring theme in poetry and literature.\n\nWhile artists have always, liberally and quite blatantly, borrowed from nature; they have also been moved, time and again, to devote their craft to salvage the very landscapes that enriched their imagination. [_River Relations: A Beholder\u2019s Share of the Columbia River_](http:\/\/www.riverrelations.ca\/), an artistic investigation by a group of creatives from Emily Carr University of Art and Design (ECUAD), is one such venture that delves into the destruction inflicted upon by the \u2018damming and development\u2019 of the Columbia River, in the wake of the renegotiation of the Columbia River Treaty.\n\nRising in the clear waters of the Columbia Lake in B.C. and surging through glaciated Canadian Rocky Mountains, the Columbia River flows through the Kootenay River\u2014the river\u2019s largest tributary on the Canadian divide of the border. It enters the U.S. at the confluence of Pend d\u2019Orielle River in the Washington state, before conclusively disappearing into the Pacific Ocean near Astoria, Oregon. Columbia River is a water wonderland, flowing with ferocious abundance, making it the largest river in North America\u2019s Pacific Northwest region, and a sanctuary for the largest salmon runs in the world.\n\n![The Columbia River. Photo Courtesy of Fred Wah.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/columbia-river-fred-wah-1_avhEyr.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nModern civilization has turned rivers into economic powerhouses, plugging them with gargantuan concrete structures to harness hydroelectric power and divert water for irrigation. The Columbia River was subjected to a similar fate, transforming its free-flowing bliss into a curse. A violent flooding spell in 1948 that wrecked the Fraser Valley in B.C, Canada, and the town of Vanport in Oregon, U.S. became the impetus for securing a cooperative development between the two countries. The talks sought to regulate water flows and to capitalize on the river\u2019s enormous hydroelectric capacity, finally culminating into a formal [_Columbia River Treaty (CRT)_](https:\/\/www.canada.ca\/en\/environment-climate-change\/corporate\/international-affairs\/partnerships-countries-regions\/north-america\/canada-united-states-columbia-river.html) in 1964. Canada committed to build three water storage reservoirs in exchange for an upfront payment of $64 million in recompense for extending sixty years of flood control to U.S., in addition to receiving one-half of the estimated hydro-power generation benefits to the U.S, on continual basis. Today, CRT is upheld as a successful example of two countries \u2018sharing the benefits\u2019 through a collaborative transboundary arrangement. Yet, the ramifications the treaty had on the Indigenous peoples and the river\u2019s salmon reserve have become a despicable addendum to the treaty.\n\nThe _River Relations_\u2019 team scrutinized historical and contemporary images of the Columbia River to understand the evolution of its landscape, outrageously interrupted by dams. The most notable output of the project is the image-text poem, published in the form of a book, entitled [_\u2018Beholden: A poem as long as the river\u2019_](https:\/\/talonbooks.com\/books\/beholden), composed by [Fred Wah](https:\/\/fredwah.ca\/), a former Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate and [Rita Wong](https:\/\/www.poetryinvoice.com\/poems\/poets\/rita-wong), a poet and an environmental activist.\n\n![Revelstoke Dam, B.C. Artwork by Nick Conbere and Photography by John Holmgren.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/revelstokedamreservoir-1_bi2Kz3.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nWah and Wong travelled the entire river stretch, from Canal Flats in the East Kootenay all the way to Fort Astoria, Oregon as a part of their research for the book. \u2018Having lived along the Kootenay River for much of my life I had always felt that the river should be called the Kootenay; that the Columbia was really just a tributary of the Kootenay\u2019, says Wah.\n\nWah believes that the treaty insolently disregarded the \u2018spiritual value\u2019 attributed to the river\u2019s salmon by the First Nations. To them, salmon is the \u2018harbinger of good news\u2019, revered as a gift from the salmon king. They believed that the salmon were actually humans, and at the start of each salmon season, they would transform into fish form on the king\u2019s command. They also celebrated the \u2018First Salmon Ceremony\u2019 to mark the beginning of each salmon season. Even today, certain tribes celebrate \u2018Salmon ceremonies\u2019 with a communal prayer for the salmon to return and inhabit the river again.\n\nThe loss of salmon has chronicled a poignant chapter in the river\u2019s history. Wong was swamped with emotions when she watched Upstream Battle (a documentary by Ben Kempas) \u2018One moment that always stays with me from that film is footage of salmon trying to swim upstream to return to their spawning grounds - and hitting a dam, and trying over and over to get beyond that obstacle - it\u2019s a heart wrenching glimpse into the painful destruction wrought by megadams.\u2019\n\nBeholden is a reflection on the devastation brought on by the damming of the river and focuses on themes of colonization, indigenous rights and mutilation of the river\u2019s ecology. \u2018Most of the language in the poem comes from a struggle between simply describing the river, (..) and finding ways to \u201clisten\u201d to the river\u2019. It was Wah who proposed to write \u2018a poem as long as the river\u2019, in collaboration with Wong. \u2018With him writing along one side, and me along the other, the words came from our experiences along the river\u2019, Wong reminisces about the poem\u2019s origins. \u2018Each of us would write along a shore of the river, from beginning to end, occasionally having our texts cross the river at bridges or dams. Rita\u2019s and my texts were not in conversation as they were written, but, finally, feel tethered to a similar poetic impulse and imagination\u2019 explains Wah.\n\n![Book cover, _Beholden: A poem as long as the river_, illustrations by Nick Conbere and cover image by Genevieve Robertson.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/beholden-book-cover-1_bB7z2B.jpeg){.pull .right}\n\nJust like Wah, Wong also let the river \u2018speak to\u2019 her and guide her writing process. \u2018Near the headwaters of the river, I made an offering and asked the river for permission to share the words arising from my journeys along it. I listened and keep listening.\u2019\n\nNick Conbere, a visual artist and an Associate Professor at ECUAD, [skillfully transcribed Beholden on a 114 feet long map of the Columbia River](http:\/\/www.nickconbere.com\/river-relations.html), with Wah and Wong\u2019s share of poems meandering along the river, as if two tributaries spiraling the entire stretch of the river. The poem\u2019s two halves are distinctly recognizable, as Wah\u2019s half has been typeset whereas Wong\u2019s is handwritten, a decision she consciously made. \u2018I felt it was important to stay with the bodily experience of writing by hand and following the river\u2019s contours. It felt closer to the experiential aspect of being along the river (\u2026)\u2019 While the book was shortlisted for the B.C Book Prize, the poem\u2019s winding digital image has been showcased at numerous art exhibitions.\n\n![Rita Wong and Fred Wah, _Beholden: a poem as long as the river_. The Gallery Installation. Photo by Touchstones Nelson Museum.](assets\/National\/blog\/listen-to-the-river\/gallery-installation-1_H8ib2Z.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nAs the two countries renegotiate the Treaty, uncertainty abounds. Would the revision of the Treaty offer a second chance at reviving all that is lost? Only time can tell. Wong reminds us \u2018There are ways to use the land that help to regenerate or heal it \u2026 (the way) Indigenous peoples coexisted with what was here - taking care of it rather than exhausting it\u2019.\n\nToday, many artists romanticize nature as well as assume an advocate\u2019s mantle. Wong believes one way the artists can solicit support for environmental issues is by dwelling on \u2018how to heal our relations with the land and water\u2019, and by imploring the society \u2018to actually care about this\u2019.\n\nThe project has drawn to a close, and the artists have moved on to explore further avenues of nature advocacy. For as long as there is heartache for all that has been lost, I\u2019ll quote Wah;\n\n> _Let\u2019s reach for solace of water to find some deep pool of larger memory that will float us past Savage Island_.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-07-08 13:21:08","first_published_at":"2020-06-04 16:58:40","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-04 16:19:23","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:40","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

听河:哥伦比亚河的颂歌

SABA DAR供文化日

7月8日,2020年7月8日

\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-06-15 09:22:06","first_published_at":"2020-06-04 15:01:52","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-04 11:56:37","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:27","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

建议21:制作Zines,而不是研究论文

Greta Rainbow为文化日

2020年6月15日

It was so powerful to see our stories on screen for the first time. I\u2019ve great respect for the work that they put into the world and normalized it for us.\n>> \u2014 Terril Calder, influential M\u00e9tis artist and stop motion animator based in Toronto.\n\n\n\u201c_Wapos Bay_ certainly did have a large influence on our early work and our company's evolution,\u201d says Neil Christopher, one of the co-founders of the Inuit owned, Nunavut-based studio, [Taqqut Productions](https:\/\/taqqut.com\/). \u201cWe started developing a stop motion series called _Beyond the Inuksuk_ that never got picked up. This was our first big project and it was definitely inspired by _Wapos Bay_.\u201d\n\nIn 2009, again in collaboration with APTN, the NFB produced the series, _Vistas_, a collection of 13 films created by Indigenous artists\u2014including Diane Obomsawin, of Abenaki descent, who has since become a well-known and award-winning animator on the animation festival circuit\u2014from across Canada.\n\nIn 2019, the NFB\u2019s unique apprenticeship program, [Hothouse](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/playlist\/hothouse\/)\u2014that gives emerging animators a chance to make a short film in 12 weeks\u2014offered Indigenous creators from across the country an opportunity to create their own films. Chris Grant, a young Mi\u2019kmaq artist from the Pabineau First Nation whose mother, Phyllis, made two NFB animated shorts (_Maq and the Spirit of the Woods_, 2006; _Wasteg_, 2008) [was one of those participants](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/film\/xo-rad-magical\/). \n\n\u201cIt was an experience of growth for me,\u201d says Grant. \u201cI was going through personal issues because I never lived in a cool city, had money and fun work. It was extremely important for me as an artist because it boosted my credentials I guess for more work. It made me realize I am an animator and filmmaker at heart, and always have been. It was a beautiful fractal of growth for me.\u201d\n\n![Top: Amanda Strong, Glenn Gear. Bottom: Christopher Auchter, Terril Calder.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/20200406-153321_M3WJ2j.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nSince about 2009 or 2010, Indigenous animation in Canada has also emerged outside the doors of the NFB, led by artists such as Terril Calder, Glenn Gear, Amanda Strong, Christopher Auchter and Taqqut Productions.\n\nTaqqut Productions was founded in 2011 by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher. Their animation work, sometimes co-produced with the Montreal animation studio, [e\u2192d films](https:\/\/edfilms.net\/), includes a mix of TV (_Ananna\u2019s Tent_) and short films (e.g. [_Amaqqut Nunaat: The Country of Wolves_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/129589325), 2011; _Little Folk of the Arctic_, 2015; _Giant Bear_, 2018, _What\u2019s My Superpower_, 2019) made primarily for younger audiences. \n\n\u201cThe aim,\u201d says Flaherty, \u201cwas to tell our stories using the language of the population of Nunavut. Taqqut\u2019s part is to foremost tell stories coming from Inuit with authentic Inuit content, using the Inuit language. Inuktitut is being lost at 1% a year, and if we have animated films targeting children to retain the language, there must be more made.\u201d\n\nIn recent years, the studio has branched out beyond traditional Inuit stories. \u201cOur younger authors,\u201d adds Flaherty, \u201care now leading Taqqut with their vision to create film catering to all audiences. We have created other animations not just from oral stories, but also stories from our books. Not just with animation, but also with puppets.\u201d\n\n![Still from \"Snip\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/snip-by-terril-calder_ge0NM3.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nIn the realm of independent animation, Terril Calder has been an influential force since making her first stop motion films. Most of the work mentioned above has dealt with assorted myths\/folk tales. Calder\u2019s work is raw, unstable and haunting, tackling a number of personal and difficult issues like identity ([_Choke_](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=C0LE61KLdmg), 2010, co-created with Michelle Latimer; _Canned Meat_, 2009; _Vessel_, 2013), memory, isolation, and the unspeakable horrors of residential schools (_Snip_, 2016; _Keewaydah_, 2017).\n\nA Drawing major graduate of the Fine Arts program at the University of Manitoba, Calder came to animation through Winnipeg\u2019s [Video Pool Media Arts Centre](http:\/\/www.videopool.org\/). \u201cAnimation,\u201d says Calder, \u201cheld and holds so many possibilities to tell my stories and bring a different perspective to screen to make change. It really is the sum of all of my parts. Activism, Storytelling, Art, Painting, Sewing, Photography, Compositing\u2026it completely challenges me in every way.\u201d\n\nAfter completing his MFA in sculpture\/installation at Concordia, the Newfoundland born, Glenn Gear worked at a software development company in Montreal. \u201cI became increasingly curious and inspired by traditional animation techniques. I fell in love with cardboard cutout and silhouette animation, but also looked at many other stop-motion animation processes with physical puppets. I began reading, researching, talking with other animators, and most importantly experimenting with as many techniques as I could with a small camera and basic setup. Although I didn\u2019t have a formal education in animation, my background in photography and sculpture greatly helped me. The ability to create a whole world, brought to life frame-by-frame, was addictive and pure magic. I was hooked.\u201d\n\nDrawing on his Inuit and Newfoundland ancestry, Gear\u2019s films touch upon personal and collective histories (e.g. _Resettlement_, _Kablun\u00e2t_, [_Ikuma Siku_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/68052651)), mixed with more poetic and playful stories (_Rosewood Casket_, _Ginkgo_, _Cry of the Loup-garou_) all with nature often in a central role. \n\n![Still from \"Kablun\u00e2t\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/kablunat-2_c8Gow0.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nChristopher Auchter grew up on the islands of Haida Gwaii, an archipelago off the Northern Pacific coast of Canada. He studied media at Vancouver\u2019s Emily Carr University of Art and Design and later graduated from Sheridan College\u2019s computer animation program. Auchter has worked in book illustration, animated for various TV series and video games, and has directed live action (_Now is the Time_, 2020) and animation shorts (notably the beautiful and award winning [_The Mountain of SGaana_](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/film\/mountain_of_sgaana\/), 2017, which told an old Haida fable).\n\nMichif artist Amanda Strong, whose animated shorts include the imaginative, haunting explorations of personal and collective ancestry, [_Four Faces of the Moon_](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=rWe--sysNkk), 2016 and _Biidaaban_, 2017) came to stop motion animation through Photo and Illustration studies at Sheridan College. \u201cIt gave me a basis to explore moving-image while using these tools to create worlds and make stories move. Stop motion really is a series of photos that sequenced together create a magical experience of movement that can\u2019t be replicated by software. It is beautiful to see that first shot move after years of making all the pieces and it sure is beautiful when the sonic and visual pieces unite. It\u2019s a powerful tool to tell stories.\u201d\n\n![Still from \"The Mountain of SGaana\", 2017.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/the-mountain-of-sgaana-001_BYca3y.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nThere are a variety of reasons for this recent rise in Indigenous-created animation films, some of which overlap with the general rise in animation production. Advancements in technology have made animation a more accessible and affordable process for many. There was a time when animators were taking anywhere from 2 to 5 to 10 years to complete a short film. Today, there are a number of animators making films annually (sometimes more than one). \n\n\u201cThe tools and processes to create animation are more accessible and cost less,\u201d agrees Glenn Gear. \u201cThere have been great strides made in the past 10 years in terms of software, especially on alternative platforms such as smartphones. Apps like Stop Motion Studio, Animation Desk, and RoughAnimator are low cost and offer a streamlined workflow for animation. You don't necessarily need a large studio with specialized equipment.\u201d\n\nSince the late 1990s, there has been a tsunami of animation programs and departments opening up across the world. To give the reader some context: I have been the Artistic Director of the [Ottawa International Animation Festival](http:\/\/www.animationfestival.ca\/) (OIAF) since the early 1990s. When I first started with the OIAF in 1991, there were 750 films submitted to the then biannual festival. Today, the OIAF receives in the range of 2,400 films (including features, VR, TV, student etc.) annually. \n\n![Still from \"Four Faces of the Moon\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/fourfaceofmoon_PjS2Mo.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nThe Simpsons (inspired by MTV and Sesame Street indirectly) showed producers and advertisers that animation could be profitable. This triggered an explosion in all avenues of animation and created a demand for talent. With the technological tools becoming more affordable, many educational institutions jumped on board to capitalize on the explosion\u2014and to train and educate a new generation of animators.\n\nIndigenous artists and youth have also benefited\u2014alongside increasing public awareness of the unjust and sometimes horrific manner that Indigenous people have been treated in Canada\u2014from these advancements. \u201cThere is more investment into teaching Indigenous youth and providing them with the digital tools alongside traditional knowledge and ways of working,\u201d says Gear. \n\n> As more and more Indigenous folks migrate towards city centers, there are more informal and formal networks of knowledge, resource, and skill sharing. There is still much to be done in this regard, but the institutions such as universities, colleges and government institutions are slowly changing to hopefully be more accountable and transparent to Indigenous folks.\n\n\"We now have access to new tools and platforms,\u201d adds Strong, whose Vancouver-based studio, [Spotted Fawn Productions](https:\/\/www.spottedfawnproductions.com\/), creates space for Indigenous artists in animation. It excites me to see more and more Indigenous people of all ages engaging with tools and technology to animate their stories. It\u2019s important that we lift each other up, celebrate our successes and always encourage other Indigenous storytellers to create.\"\n\n\"Our voices, cultures, and diverse stories are finally being heard by a larger public,\u201d adds Gear. \u201cWhen I asked filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin about the changes she has seen in the reception of Indigenous work in the past 10 years, she said, \u2018People are finally listening.\u2019\"\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-04-14 10:41:05","first_published_at":"2020-04-06 15:01:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-04-06 13:07:52","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:00","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

“人们终于听了” - indigenous动画升起

克里斯罗宾逊文化日

2020年4月14日

符合我们的组织者:来自雅伯的Jube学校的Karen

文化日

3月30日,2020年3月30日

符合我们的组织者:GANANOQUE的艺术炸弹节

文化日

3月21日,2020年3月21日

We're introducing sports people to theatre, and theatre people to sports\u2014and then there's people like us, who are in between, who can understand both worlds and love it.\n\nOn a summer night in 2008, at the corner of Queens Quay West and Bathurst in Toronto, six figures meet to play basketball. It's a weekly tradition: every Monday night at 10 pm, they meet here and shoot hoops until the lights at the court go out. The instigator was Richard Lee, who sent an email to fellow actors with an offer of a weekly game, held on Mondays\u2014the night the theatre is dark. Now, 12 years later, the tradition lives on through an innovative stage production: [_Monday Nights_](https:\/\/6thmancollective.wordpress.com\/).\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-1-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_7ZKtvW.jpeg)\n\n_Monday Nights_ was developed as part of the [Theatre Centre Residency Program](http:\/\/theatrecentre.org\/?p=1322) and saw its world premiere in Toronto in 2014, with subsequent runs in 2015 (to coincide with Toronto hosting the Pan American Games), 2017 and 2019. Most recently, it was mounted in New Westminster, BC, as part of the 2020 [PuSh International Performing Arts Festival](https:\/\/pushfestival.ca\/).\n\n\"As you grow up, you stop playing and you do adult things. You're working, you're paying bills, you're starting a career, you're trying to find love,\" says Byron Abalos. He and the other members of the [6th Man Collective](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/pg\/6thmancollective\/posts\/?ref=page_internal)\u2014veterans of the Monday night games\u2014hoped to put that conundrum to bed by adapting their weekly tradition to the stage.\n\nWhat does a pick-up basketball game look like as a piece of theatre? Upon entering the theatre, retrofitted into a makeshift basketball court, audience members are instructed by a \"referee\" (a performer in the production who acts as a guide of sorts) to choose from among the four sports bags. Each bag represents a \"team captain,\" whose journey they'll follow through the rest of _Monday Nights_. For the first half of the show, they listen to audio on headsets about their captain's personal story, as the performers run through basketball drills to teach them the rules of the game. Each captain's story is autobiographical, based on the performers in the collective; Abalos's story reflects his and his wife's attempts to conceive a child via in-vitro fertilization, for example.\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-4-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_uygO2V.jpeg)\n\nAround half-time, audience members join performers for a game of three-on-three. The stakes are unspeakably high: \"The captain of the team with the fewest points has to do the laundry of the other captains,\" after the show, Abalos admits. The show ends with performers and audience members continuing the Monday night tradition: sinking baskets until the lights go out.\n\n\"It's a journey from individual to community,\" Abalos explains. Audience members start as individuals, before coming together as competing teams, before ultimately forming a larger group. This unification is evident in the disparate audience members who come out to experience _Monday Nights_. \"It's often people who are not sports people, who hated gym in high school, who leave saying, 'Wow, that moved me and I understand sport in a different way than I did before.'\"\n\nSimilarly, he says, the show has attracted athletes who aren't necessarily predisposed to a night at the theatre. \"We had a father who brought his son, a teenager. This was the first piece of theatre they'd ever seen. There's something about the appeal of the sports part of it that made them curious enough to come on down. We're introducing sports people to theatre, and theatre people to sports\u2014and then there's people like us, who are in between, who can understand both worlds and love it.\"\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-2-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_6mvl9d.jpeg)\n\nWhat are the commonalities between art and sport that makes the fusion so uplifting? \"Camaraderie, being in our bodies, competition, a chance to connect with each other as people,\" Abalos says. \"\\[Both art and sport] connect us to each other and help us to put ourselves in situations, to build empathy, to create community and to leave us better.\"\n\n_Monday Nights_ recently finished its West Coast dates, and life is back to normal. The sporting spirit remains high in Toronto with the Raptors as sitting NBA champs. Byron and his wife dote on their baby, now seven months old. And, 12 years later, the Monday night gang still gets together to play basketball. The only difference? \"We play on Saturday mornings\u2026 because we're all older and it works better for our schedules.\"\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-03-12 15:41:01","first_published_at":"2020-03-11 09:46:22","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-03-05 13:35:20","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:24:11","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

直到灯光出去

泰勒贝索文化日

3月12日,2020年3月12日

符合我们的组织者:Regina的Vrunda

文化日

2月18日,2020年

符合我们的组织者:Piikani Nation的Quinton

文化日

2月7日,2020年2月7日

概念和参与:对展览的思考

戴夫染料

2020年1月8日

博物馆作为合作空间

塞缪尔伯尼尔 - 鸬鹚

2019年11月29日

回顾了公元前10年的文化日

克里斯汀劳森

2019年9月5日

投入时间 - 参与调查

戴夫染料

2019年8月22日

桥接代:指导的价值 - 第2部分

克里斯汀劳森

2019年8月16日

桥接代:指导的价值 - 第1部分

克里斯汀劳森

2019年8月12日

肘部的小城镇魅力大部分文化日

Busayo Osobade.

2019年8月8日

引发BC的创造力 - 第2部分

克里斯汀劳森

2019年7月18日

Maybe we need interventions. Maybe we need something to give us a moment to take a step to the side. Not a step back, just a step to the side. And just take a moment to pause and realign, and recalibrate, and redefine what matters.\n\n![Artist Kat Singer.](assets\/National\/blog\/a-step-to-the-side\/singer.jpg){.small}\nMultimedia artist, maker, activist and educator Kat Singer, who will be guiding attendees through the collaborative creation of sculptures from reclaimed materials, has found personal healing in similar work. \"My work helps me process whatever I am going through at the moment,\" explains Kat. \"As I build a figure, stitch by stitch, I contemplate the meanings behind my struggles, and honour my story. When a sculpture is complete, I often feel relieved, since I have a much better understanding of what I am dealing with.\" The sculptures Kat will be making with visitors at CD@L will take the form of trees, which, they explain, represent ideas of growth, resilience and adaptability \u2013 key components of wellness.\n\n![Textile sculpture. Photo courtesy of Kat Singer.](assets\/National\/blog\/a-step-to-the-side\/singer-textile-sculpture-detail.jpg)\n\nJaene F. Castrillon, whose work combines art and activism with spirituality, also has a personal story of finding improved well-being through art. \"My entire practice came into being in 2013 after bouts of chronic illness and pain rendered me disabled,\" Jaene explains. \"My art has become an adventure that celebrates the brilliance and heartbreak of living a life less ordinary \u2013 creating an alternative to harmful notions around wellness, illness and worthiness, honouring art as medicine by taking up space and digging into myself.\"\n\nAt CD@L, Jaene will offer a dreamcatcher workshop, where Indigenous elders will share their knowledge on the significance of the dreamcatcher while participants create their own. \"It is said by some that they let our good dreams through and diffuse our bad dreams so they don't return. A good night's sleep is [an] integral part of wellness,\" she explains. \n\n![Artist Jaene F. Castrillon, _A Celebration of Darkness_. Photo courtesy of Jaene F. Castrillon.](assets\/National\/blog\/a-step-to-the-side\/castrillion-a-celebration-of-darkness.png)\n\nWhile Jaene, Kat and Kanika are multidisciplinary artists with diverse approaches to their respective crafts, all agree on the fundamental nourishing essence of creativity. \"Creativity ought to be recognized for its crucial role in a healthy lifestyle, and given the time and space it deserves,\" says Kat. \"[Art] has been a source of joy and healing for me. When I share my art with others, I invite them to nourish what is already inside them: resilience, beauty, and joy.\"\n\nAnd what better place to undertake these activities of creativity and connection than the library, which, for Jaene, represented a childhood sanctuary against hardship and abuse: \"I feel that I survived my very bleak childhood because I could borrow books by authors like Charles Dickens, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Edgar Allan Poe. [\u2026] Libraries have been intrinsic to my survival and upbringing.\"\n\nKanika, who tries to reduce barriers in her artistic practice, values the library as a space of accessibility. \"In theory, it doesn't discriminate, [if] you're a newcomer to the city, you have special needs, whatever it may be. [\u2026] It's a public space that's welcoming to everyone, that fosters knowledge and growth.\"\n\nWith six artist-led programs taking place, there are ample opportunities for knowledge and growth, and to explore what Kanika calls \"the natural human urge\" of creativity. \n\n>So many people stop themselves, like, 'oh, I can't make art, I'm not good,' or whatever stories or inhibitions they have. That's why I'm excited to do a program like this for Culture Days, because it's really for everyone. And it doesn't matter if you think you're good or bad. What matters is if you're interested, you're curious, you wanna be creative, you wanna explore yourself, and you just wanna try something new.\n>> \u2013 Kanika Gupta\n \nOn September 27 and 28, try something new with Culture Days @ the Toronto Public Library.\n\n\n**Culture Days @ the Library is an initiative of Ontario Culture Days, curated by Meaghan Froh Metcalf, Outreach & Programs Manager, for it's ninth iteration in 2019.**\n\n**This Ontario Culture Days program is produced in partnership with [Toronto Public Library](https:\/\/www.torontopubliclibrary.ca\/). Ontario's @ the Library programming is made possible thanks to the support of the [Ontario Library Association](http:\/\/www.accessola.org\/web).**","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2019-07-17 12:00:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-07-10 11:25:39","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:59","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

朝侧的一步:文化日@图书馆提供弹性,美容和喜悦

泰勒贝索

2019年7月17日

连接到颜色

Aubrey Reeves.

2019年7月17日

音乐到舒缓

Aubrey Reeves.

2019年7月10日

编织一个,purl一个,放松一些

Aubrey Reeves.

2019年7月3日

通过艺术恢复老化

leah凉鞋

2019年5月22日

生活独奏/社会社会方面的艺术参与

FrédéricJulien.

2019年4月8日

通过艺术建立心理健康

leah凉鞋

2019年3月19日

当艺术是最好的药物

leah凉鞋

2019年2月5日

\u201cCreate the highest vision possible for your life, because you become what you believe.\"\n>>-Oprah\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-survival-guide\/mandy-2.jpg)\n\nYou must invest in your art, your child within, for what moves you ultimately moves others.\nThis life is a \u201cchoose your own adventure,\u201dso if you are not invested in your own journey, then you can become derailed rather quickly. Why not stay the course with what brings you delight and a healthy challenge? Finding your truth(s) as an artist, in whatever medium that may be, takes time or, for some, simply the acknowledgement that it exists within you to take up the reins and run with it. (Think back to the last time you saw a child or yourself as a child gleefully engulfed in an artistic, self-directed task for hours.) Check in with yourself and where you are at to see what honestly resonates with you today.\n\nFind your strength in community. Taking great strides in any direction takes conviction, but also a heck of a lot of support from within and externally from your people. Not everyone needs be like-minded. Contrary to popular belief, sometimes people with varying life experiences or different age groups and opinions can be the grit to solidify your resolve and really get focused or more dedicated to an aspect of yourself, your art, or your business. Be gentle with yourself \u2013 reinvention of oneself when transitioning to school, out of school, the workforce, within contracts, and everything else your life may offer up takes a village. Be sure to choose wisely as to whom you opt into your circle. Ask for help! Learn the power of yes and no!\n\nShare. This may sound downright simple, but I know full well that the perfectionist inside can thwart many possibilities of showcasing or sharing where you happen to be along in your process. Know that where you are at is simply that:s a mere snapshot in time. CONGRATS and way to go! This is your best for right now. Be confident in that. Take great pride. Try not to cut yourself off at the foot by holding yourself back from opportunities, grants, auditions, etc., for not being \u201cready yet.\u201d The marvellous actor Hugh Laurie has been quoted saying:\n\n_\u201cIt's a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you're ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.\u201d \u2015 Hugh Laurie_\n\nWouldn\u2019t you agree?\n\nThis whole notion of scarcity of time can stem from a sense of not doing your soul's work, your truth, honouring and owning that, sharing what authentically moves you with those you love and with steadfast and new audiences that you have yet to engage with, whom you will empower and move with your work. That being said, time can quicken when in the zone of channelling your talents and time, but the rewards somehow blend together to hold you to your higher power and elevate your resolve to invest in yourself, to move your feet, inspiration and career forward, and apply for the next opportunity that you deem fit for your own very personal evolution.\n\nI implore you to stick to your guns and get out there and take yourself on an artist date as often as you can! Try a new hobby, craft or art form, medium, class, or delve even deeper into your passion and madly pursue it. Why not? It\u2019s far better than the alternative.\n\nHope to see you at the Pop-Up event lunchtime 12-2 p.m. at Robson Square Wednesday, September 26th or out at the Culture Days Hub where I\u2019ll be your emcee Friday, September 28 from 2-7:30 p.m., then 7:30-8 p.m. I will perform \u201cMandy Rushton\u2019s Pop-Culture Cabaret and Sing-a-Long. I also take the stage Saturday, September 29, at the same time, 7:30 p.m.-8 p.m.\n\nNow get out there and do your thing, do it well, and don\u2019t give up on yourself, nor the pursuit of showing up authentically in your life. Live it out well!\n\n_**Mandy Rushton**, a born performer, raised in BC and currently based in Vancouver, is a multi-talented, triple threat. She is a dynamic character actor, having graced a multitude of stages, performing vaudeville in Dawson City, Yukon, musical theatre across Canada and the States, including the PNE and Canada's Wonderland, animation in Cancun, and hundreds of venues in between. You can catch her voice next in the upcoming feature film: CARGO where she had a blast voicing characters, keeping the director and producers in stitches. Mandy has used her skills to transform into a VIP hospitality entertainer. In years past she\u2019s served as an emcee\/singer\/host for corporate events, high profile charity galas\/product launches and special event\/fundraisers, raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for worthy causes. A highlight of her career was the opportunity to perform for the consulate of the Netherlands and 800+ Holocaust survivors at the first ever WWll conference in North York, Toronto. Mandy spellbinds the young and young at heart, sharing the magic of intimate stories with her audience. A bonafide torch singer and lover of The Great American Songbook, this balladeer has found time to produce and star in her own one-woman cabaret acts. There\u2019s no limit to what she can or will do next!_\n\n**Instagram:** [@msrushton101](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/msrushton101\/) \n**Twitter: **[@mandy_rushton](https:\/\/twitter.com\/mandy_rushton) \n**Facebook:** [www.facebook.com\/MsRushton101 or Reverbnation.com\/mandyrushton](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/MsRushton101\/) \n**Website:** [http:\/\/resumes.actorsaccess.com\/MandyRushton](http:\/\/resumes.actorsaccess.com\/MandyRushton) \n**YouTube:** [http:\/\/www.youtube.com\/c\/MandyRushton101](http:\/\/www.youtube.com\/c\/MandyRushton101) \n**Vimeo:** [https:\/\/vimeo.com\/mandyrushton](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/mandyrushton) \n**Linkedin:** [www.linkedin.com\/in\/mandyrushton](http:\/\/www.linkedin.com\/in\/mandyrushton)","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2018-09-17 18:30:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-06-24 16:45:27","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

艺术家的生存指南

Mandy Rushton.

2018年9月17日

出现

伊娜娜屁股

2018年8月27日

\"Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.\u201d\n>>-Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities\n\n![Gay Village, pedestrian only street, Montreal. Photo by Lisa Yang](assets\/National\/blog\/why-public-spaces-matter\/dsc-01881.jpg)\n\nDuring my undergrad, one course that really struck me was, \u201cUrban Transformations, Affective Cartography\u201d. We studied how urban landscapes are more than just spatial. We looked at how public space, specifically, urban space, affect our physical, psychological, and emotional well-being. I started to become aware of how we behave in everyday scenarios when we are alone versus when we are brought together in situations like public installations, street art, festivals, markets etc. In this blog series, I will look at what can be considered good public space, showcase innovative uses of public space, and hopefully increase awareness of the public spaces in Canada. But first\u2026\n\n# Why does public space matter? \nThere are specific criteria for determining public space. Generally speaking, a public space is a place that is accessible to the public at any time of day, such as parks, beaches, squares, roads, sidewalks, etc. These spaces all serve different functions, and can easily just be seen in spatial terms. Yet with the effort of communities, they can be turned into lively, creative spaces that bring people together. While there are plenty of reasons why public space is important, here are the top five.\n\n**1) It benefits our health** \nEspecially in cities or so-called \u2018concrete jungles\u2019, public spaces such as parks create a relaxing and inviting atmosphere where people can come and decompress from their stressful daily routines at home and work either by relaxing or being physically active. Parks can also mitigate air, climate and water pollution that is all around us. Some of the most well-known urban public parks are Central Park in New York City, Stanley Park in Vancouver, and Mount Royal in Montreal.\n\n**2) It helps build a sense of community, civic identity and culture** \nPublic space alone does not build community. Citizens who initiate and participate in community building activities and events create community through placemaking, or what the Project for Public Spaces calls \u201can effective process that capitalizes on a local community\u2019s assets, inspiration, and potential to improve the quality of people\u2019s health, happiness, and well-being.\" That said, a successful public space can inspire and attract citizens to come together and interact in that space. Compare a park that\u2019s spacious, has plenty of seating space and greenery to attract citizens, versus a dirty, garbage ridden environment that has not been invested in or used wisely. While community can really be created anywhere, there needs to be space that is open and accessible so that community projects can take place. \n\n**3) Has the ability to drive economic growth** \nTake for example Place des Arts Esplanade in Montreal; every year, hundreds of thousands of people come from all over the world to visit the many festivals that take place at the esplanade. Markets, are another reminder that open and shared space drives more traffic and is mutually beneficial for business owners and the local economy through sales, taxes, and increased jobs. In 2002, PPS (Project for Public Spaces) surveyed 800 customers from a variety of indoor and open-air markets around the country. PPS discovered that 60% of market shoppers also visited nearby stores on the same day; of those, 60% said that they visited those additional stores only on days that they visit the market.\n\n**4) Can transform wasted space** \nIn the TED talk, \u201cHow public spaces make cities work?\u201d, Amanda Burden, the former director of the New York City Department of City Planning, provided an example of a degraded waterfront in the neighborhoods of Greenpoint and Williamsburg in Brooklyn. The waterfront was abandoned and nearly impossible to access. Consequently there was little to no traffic or economic activity. It was basically a waste of space in a beautiful city. A group of architects took on the project and transformed the waterfront into a public space filled with green parks and tree-lined paths. Today the space thrives, and even has an excellent transportation system that runs through it. The lesson drawn from this example is that when you create an inviting space, people will come.\n\n**5) Public spaces, if utilized and designed well can give a city character and enhance architectural diversity** \nEspecially in urban environments, where skyscrapers reign and concrete is the main building material of choice, a dash of colour, a community attraction or public art installation can make a huge difference in the city. Consider Bryant Park in New York City, an urban park in the middle of Manhattan. It is a convenient space for employees and tourists alike to take a break and hang out among planted flowers and tree-lined paths. Art installations are another example of how public space can liven up the city. For example, the annual Luminoth\u00e9rapie exhibition of interactive art at Places Des Arts in Montreal, From Here Until Now, in Winnipeg, or Yue Minjun's A-Maze-Ing Laughter in Morton Park, Vancouver. These installations not only complement the city\u2019s landscape but they encourage people to interact with the art pieces and become a subject of conversation.","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2015-09-10 19:45:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-06-25 10:30:31","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

公共空间很重要的原因

丽莎杨

2015年9月10日

避免艺术史?

保罗拜伦

2014年12月3日

I was not compelled to consider how we should make the case for the value of the arts but to whom? and why?\n\nHearing both Shawn and Alain speak to many of these arguments, I was not compelled to consider how we should make the case for the value of the arts but to whom? and why? Does \u2018society\u2019 really need convincing that their culture should be valued? While Canadians might be known to have an infamous inferiority complex, to imagine that we don\u2019t value who we are, that we don\u2019t express our cultural and social values openly and often, would be ridiculous.\n\nSo when we debate the value of arts and culture, let\u2019s be clear about whom we\u2019re talking to and why. This debate is not social, but political. And, it\u2019s not about the value of arts and culture in and of itself. It\u2019s about the value of arts and culture as a public good, worthy of adequate government investment to promote an active, democratic and accessible engagement in the diverse expression of our collective identity. It\u2019s also about protecting our sense of identity and belonging as a nation, from the populist, elitist and exclusionary forces of a purely market driven economy.\n\nWhen we reflect back on the origins of our cultural policies, dating back to the Massey report of the 1950's, Canada was cautioned that if we did not publicly fund a collective sense of identity through the arts we would be at risk of becoming more American. This sentiment gave birth to our system of public investment in arts and culture \u2013 a system that is floundering as government investment fails to keep pace with a rapidly growing arts and culture sector that reflects an increasingly pluralistic Canadian cultural identity.\n\nThe challenge is not a simple one, and the answer is not only in the hands of the public sector. However, as governments increasingly see themselves as corporate entities focused primarily on economic goals, we are losing sight of why the arts are publicly funded in the first place. Engagement in arts and culture gives us space to define our shared values, to understand difference, to contemplate our evolution as a society, to facilitate our personal creative expression, to feel a sense of belonging, and to express our unique identity as a nation. These are aims that any democratic government should be eager to support in order to better understand the collective consciousness of the citizens they represent, defend and make decisions for.\n\nBut as economic aims headline our political conversations, making the case for arts and culture has devolved from a principled argument about defending a fundamental public good that contributes to our well-being as Canadians, to an argument about job creation, contribution to GDP and tax revenues.\n\nThere was a time when the role of government (with the help of better-supported non-profits and charities), was to protect the economic, social and cultural well-being of its citizens, providing a kind of counterpoint to profit-driven, private sector interests. As our political system becomes more ideological and partisan, has it also become less representative and responsive? Have our values as Canadians become less and less reflected in government decision-making? Are we, indeed, becoming less Canadian?\n\n> \u201cA nation\u2019s civilization can be measured fairly by the extent to which [its] creative artists \u2026 are supported, encouraged and esteemed by [the] nation as a whole.\u201d\n\nTo defend the arts in economic terms has become a contemporary trend and an unfortunate, but necessary, tactic when speaking to governments about investment. As Massey cautioned us more than a half century ago, this approach is not a sustainable one. He knew then that \u201cA nation\u2019s civilization can be measured fairly by the extent to which [its] creative artists \u2026 are supported, encouraged and esteemed by [the] nation as a whole.\u201d Measured in these terms, how far have we really come?\n\nIf we wish to defend the value of arts and culture in Canada, let's listen carefully to, and consider the role we expect of our elected officials. How do they reflect our values as Canadians? And, more importantly, how will they enable Canadians to express and celebrate our own collective sense of self? How will they invest in our progress? Will they put our collective well-being at the forefront of their agenda? Will they make the case for arts and culture?","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2014-12-01 12:00:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-06-25 11:16:39","updated_at":"2019-08-24 10:21:38","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

当我们争论艺术价值时,我们真正谈论的是什么:在#Cultureshock辩论上的反思

Shannon Litzenberger.

2014年12月1日

数字有什么问题?

inga petri.

2014年11月24日

追求不确定的职业

保罗拜伦

2014年11月5日

假日事务:企业受众的编程

Shannon Litzenberger.

2013年12月12日

我们所知道的(不知道)关于加拿大艺术观众

Shannon Litzenberger.

2013年12月9日

What is the number one barrier to independent artists participating in Culture Days?\u201d The answer was: venues. The ensuing partnership was created in part to remedy this problem.\n\nThe Toronto Public Library viewed this challenge as an opportunity to develop partnerships that would strengthen its relationships and commitment to the city\u2019s local cultural and artistic communities. One of their key partners in Culture Days @ the Library is The Neighbourhood Arts Network, a strategic initiative of the Toronto Arts Council, that helps artists and community organizations enrich Toronto\u2019s urban landscape, transforming it into a more vibrant, beautiful, liveable city.\n\nFrom Etobicoke to Scarborough, North York to downtown Toronto, during the Culture Days weekend, Toronto Public Library branches provide free venues for Toronto-based artists, small and medium-sized professional arts groups, as well as volunteer-run cultural organizations, collectives and associations, so that they can organize activities, workshops, exhibitions and performances for local residents. The Neighbourhood Arts Network disseminates information about this opportunity to Toronto\u2019s independent artists and community focused arts organizations to make them aware and invite them to participate.\n\nThrough its participation in Culture Days, and more broadly with this innovative programming and approach to community outreach, the Toronto Public Library, in collaboration with its key partners, maintains a central position in life of the community. Since 2011, the program has helped more than 117 artists and arts groups share their work with more than 5,000 Torontonians in 70 library branches across the city.\n\nSome of the impacts of Culture Days @ the Library include providing artists access to free spaces to show their work, as well as augmenting the number of people that interact with their work. Event organizers have commented that artists tend to stay in touch with their local branch, and are able to deliver programs and activities at other times during the year. Finally, this partnership enables the Toronto Public Library to create and co-host fun and engaging activities for the members of their local library branches and the community at large.\n\n![Shannon Thunderbird at the Toronto Public Library Scarborough, 2012](assets\/National\/blog\/mobilizing-community\/toronto-public-library-4.jpg){.pull .right}\n\n**The Role of the Independent Artist as Mobilizer**\n\nShannon Thunderbird, Coast Tsimshian Elder, artist, Founder and Artistic Director of [Teya Peya Productions](http:\/\/www.shannonthunderbird.com\/teya_peya_communications.htm) has performed three times as part of Culture Days @ the Library: at Black Creek in 2011 and at Kennedy\/Eglington in 2012. This year, she brought her workshop to the Annette Street branch. \u201cShe has a really interesting and exciting activity that is easy to promote. Branch staff have always been quick to snap up her program,\u201d says Miriam Scribner.\n\nEntitled \u201cRolling Thunder,\u201d this year\u2019s workshop brings forth women\u2019s voices and recalls the power of the human spirit. It also provides an opportunity for new immigrants and others to learn about First Nations people, stories, teachings, music and rhythms, which help, as she says, \u201cbridge the cultural divide.\u201d\n\n>Toronto has a large Native population. It behooves Elders like myself to reach out to them, and to all those interested in peaceful relationships, to come together in a good way,\u201d says Shannon.\n\nShannon\u2019s own art practice shares important values with Culture Days\u2019 objectives of inclusion and hands-on participation by citizens. The goal of her activity during Culture Days is to raise awareness and understanding amongst Native and non-Native people around the contributions and richness of First Nations cultures.\n\n>My interactive approach empowers people from all over the world to give to themselves a strong sense of self-confidence and fearlessness by broadening personal goals and their understanding of different cultures,\u201d says Shannon. \u201cI use the medicine wheel as a unifying symbol of peaceful interaction and as an indicator of our spirit\u2019s health and wellness. It is adaptable to contemporary times, and is a wonderfully uplifting way of developing both environmental awareness and strength of character for personal and professional pro-active change,\u201d says Shannon.\n\nClick here to listen to Shannon Thunderbird talk about her work bridging relationships between First Nations and newly arrived immigrants:\n\n![](https:\/\/youtu.be\/q0moSnsCWqc) \n \nWhile the foundation of Canadian citizenship is tied to the history of all of the people of Canada, including First Nations people, their culture and history are often overlooked in schoolrooms. Shannon\u2019s mission is to share this history, especially with new Canadians. As an Elder and educator, she finds these exchanges especially gratifying, and is hopeful that in the future First Nations cultures will be celebrated in \u201cpositive and uplifting\u201d ways.\n\n\u201cNewly arrived immigrants get very excited, they know that Canada has original Native people and when they come to the performance, they are enthralled about these stories, and they are very respectful,\u201d explains Shannon.\n\nSharing across cultural boundaries paves the way for innovation and mutual understanding, attributes that are increasingly necessary for people to co-habit in a globalized and interconnected world. People often reside in compact, multicultural cities and work within professions that are more and more specialized. Libraries have understood this reality, and have worked towards empowering citizens, revitalizing communities, building a sense of belonging and providing support structures for citizens.\n\nClick on the link to listen to Shannon Thunderbird talk about the value of traditional First Nations teachings and how they are relevant today:\n\n![](https:\/\/youtu.be\/eJD-AGvaCfQ)\n \n**Exporting a Participation Model to Other Library Networks**\n\nIn 2012, the venue matching process was decentralized to allow local branches more freedom to select activities that fit their space and ones that would attract local community members. For the last two years, information sessions for all activity organizers were presented by the Toronto Public Library, the Neighbourhood Arts Network and Culture Days Ontario. Local library branches make arrangements directly with the artists, which improves communication and makes for more efficient planning.\n\n>These info sessions have been invaluable in creating stronger connections with artists, helping us to better know the individuals and their work. Through them, we have learned more about what artists may need, how to assist them in their Culture Days activities, and also create links that can be drawn on in the future,\u201d says Miriam Scribner.\n\n\u201cThe Toronto Public Library is eager to make its experience available to other systems and to that end we have participated in a webinar on Culture Days @ the Library organized by Culture Days in partnership with the Ontario Library Association,\u201d says Miriam Scribner. The Toronto Public Library is now reaching out to other library networks. All three partners - Toronto Public Library, Neighbourhood Arts Network and Culture Days Ontario - are participating in creating a resource kit that other library systems may benefit from.\n\n>Libraries have been great partners across the province,\u201d says Catherine McLeod. \u201cAt least 127 activities were presented in or by libraries in 2012, and at least 102 library branches participated in Culture Days. I have talked to people quite a bit about our model and sent other libraries some examples of our materials and systems.\u201d\n\nThe Stratford Library has been an active participant over the last few years. In Manitoba, Michelle Rosner, Culture Days\u2019 Communications and Events Coordinator, has recently confirmed the participation of 3 to 5 library branches that will host [art exhibitions and musical performances](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/2013-activities\/view\/52052b76-21f0-40b5-a43c-33554c4a89be). The model created in Ontario has also inspired a project between the Winnipeg Public Library, Culture Days Manitoba, and the architectural firm StorefrontMB, which invites local artists to design Little Free Libraries for Winnipeg neighbourhoods.\n\nThe partners in Ontario are now interested in working with smaller library systems, which could benefit from expertise in their efforts to scale up participation by local artists and provide increased access to a more diversified audience base.\n\n>We are working to put together a toolkit based on this program so that other library systems can replicate it,\u201d confirms Catherine McLeod.\n\nThe workload is heavy, however, the project is viable because of the existing partnership, and the sustained efforts put into it by an engaged staff that supports it.\n\n**Conclusion**\n\nAs Libraries become hubs for people to network and connect around issues that matter to them, artists are invited to take part by bringing their knowledge and experience to serve as a catalyst for people\u2019s creativity. Artists, such as Shannon Thunderbird, also help forge bonds between different realities, inviting citizens to \u201cstamp their cultural passports,\u201d to use her evocative expression, as a way to understand themselves, as well as others, within the context of changing global communities.\n\nPart of the artist\u2019s role is to educate and introduce citizens to the unlimited wealth of cultural life in their own communities. With Culture Days @ the Library, the Toronto Public Library, The Neighbourhood Arts Network and Culture Days Ontario, publicly recognize the artist\u2019s presence and value to their community. As was the case with the [Artist-Animateur program in Saskatchewan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/blog\/2013\/07\/23\/saskatchewan-artist\/), artists in the Greater Toronto Area working within the Toronto Public Library system engage segments of the Canadian population often left out of the usual cultural circuits. Learning to live together, discovering new things, celebrating local heritage, and encouraging people to connect to their own creativity lay the foundations for vibrant, innovative and prosperous knowledge societies.\n\nThis blog was made possible thanks to the generous support of [The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation](http:\/\/www.mcconnellfoundation.ca\/en) and the [Canada Council for the Arts](http:\/\/www.canadacouncil.ca\/).","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2013-11-01 12:00:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-06-25 15:32:02","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

动员社区:当地艺术家与多伦多公共图书馆合作

约翰内特格莱

2013年11月1日

观众作为艺术家:改变当代公众的艺术体验

Shannon Litzenberger.

2013年10月26日

青年,艺术,文化:双赢

Penelope Kerr.

2013年8月14日

It introduces you to all things Canadian from an artistic point of view. You cannot get that hands-on experience in any book.\n\nNew citizens can explore the best in Canadian culture from coast-to-coast like the [Museum of Vancouver](http:\/\/www.museumofvancouver.ca\/), [Banff National Park](http:\/\/www.pc.gc.ca\/eng\/pn-np\/ab\/banff\/index.aspx), [Canada's Royal Winnipeg Ballet](http:\/\/www.rwb.org\/), the [Art Gallery of Ontario](http:\/\/www.ago.net\/), [Montreal Museum of Fine Arts](http:\/\/www.mbam.qc.ca\/) and [Canadian Museum of Immigration](http:\/\/www.pier21.ca\/) at Pier 21 in Halifax - just to name a few!\n\nCanoo is in a league of its own. There isn\u2019t another program in the world like it! This welcoming offer ignites a shared passion for Canadian cultural experiences, connecting attractions and new citizens for the long term.\n\nYan W. says:\n\n>It opens the door and it doesn\u2019t cost you anything. By taking in these types of cultural experiences, you realize that life can be beyond what\u2019s tied up in daily activities.\n\n\nWith the support of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canoo is introduced to every new Canadian citizen at their citizenship ceremony, and to date, more than 280,000 new citizens have participated in the program.\n\nEric P, past Canoo Member, says:\n\n>I have no doubt that this will enrich me more about the heritage & current developments on arts and culture of Canada. Again, merci.\n\nMore details about Canoo, can be found here: https:\/\/www.icc-icc.ca\/site\/program\/canoo\/. \nCanoo is free to download on Google Play and the App Store\n\n\n_This post has been updated with new information on 2019\/06\/26_","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2013-05-29 12:00:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-06-26 10:36:41","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

Canoo:为新公民的加拿大文化开门

Jess Duerden.

5月29日2013年5月29日