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再保险:目的

文化日的迈克·格林

2021年6月29日

当少即是多:戏剧可以从一年的慢动作中学到什么

梅根·亨特参加文化日

2021年7月28日,

刷新:Instagram的一年如何重新定义艺术社区

文化日的伊娃·莫里森

2021年7月15日

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 12:49:43","first_published_at":"2021-06-17 10:05:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-17 09:44:04","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:27","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

艺术运动

文化日的Aaron Rothermund

2021年6月29日

My process of reimagining theatre began with writing letters about these issues. I will never forget the private disclosures regarding systemic racism shared with me in this process: dozens of artists reached out to share, but were afraid to speak publicly. I felt a tremendous sense of responsibility to make my theatre community a better place. \n\nAn old theatre adage states that one must leave town before they are valued in their home community. I imagine a time where that is not the case. \n\n![Shot of Hannah Moscovitch's \"The Kaufman Kabaret\". Set design by Hannah Matiachuk. 2016. University of Alberta.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-theatre\/img-0987_O7cFMB.jpg){.pull}\n\nCOVID-19 dealt the theatre community a severe blow, but it also gave our community a crucial opportunity. Many have wondered, why now? Why bring a conversation on racial equity and equality now when the industry is struggling? Power structures are intimidating; we are often silent (or silenced) in their presence. It\u2019s much simpler to share stories and express disagreement when there is no work to be gained or lost. \n\nBut the deeper dynamics of gatekeeping aren\u2019t affected by a pandemic. There is power in wielding money and contracts, so it quickly becomes safer to remain passive. If those who have the financial means to sustain you are at odds with those challenging the status quo, where do we place our support? To whom do we have a responsibility? \n\n**Imagine\u2026 a healthy workplace.** \n\nEarly in my career, I elevated all my relationships to the status of family or close friends, to the detriment of my self-advocacy. It\u2019s not that deeper relationships aren\u2019t welcome, but we can forget that we are each other\u2019s co-workers. As professional colleagues, we need to uphold standards of employment that reflect the industry we want. \n\n\u201c\u2026employers have an obligation to create an inclusive workplace. This includes removing discriminatory barriers that prevent individuals from getting a job or promotion; accommodating employees who have special needs; and ensuring that the work environment is free from discrimination.\u201d (Alberta Human Rights Act) \n\nI\u2019m reimagining professional industry where meaningful engagement with marginalized communities results in fewer barriers. When barriers go unchallenged because challengers risk losing their livelihoods, the industry suffers as much as the individual. The theatre industry suffers a lack of credibility when it fights positive change. \n\nAnyone can forget their responsibility and connection to a community, including marginalized artists. We are all flawed and capable of oppressing each other in this competitive environment. How do we open the doors to alleviate some of that competition? \n\nCan theatre companies who receive local, provincial, and federal public arts funding cast a wider net to find their talent? Open calls for auditions are not always so open; every community has examples of companies that hold auditions yet continually hire the same people. Leadership positions often draw from a similar pool of insiders, without much effort to consider new voices. Accessing a path to influential positions is nearly impossible for many multi-talented artists. \n\n**Imagine\u2026 taking chances on people.** \n\nI\u2019m reimagining a theatre community where our latent talents get a chance to blossom, where we look to the margins of ourselves and our community: actors can be dramaturges; designers can be producers. We can be fluid as theatre artists. We must allow for horizontal and vertical growth. An artist should be able to broaden their horizons as well as deepen their practice. Artists yearn to stretch. When we put ourselves or others in boxes, we kill the little opportunity for surprising new directions. We revert to the way something has always been done instead of fostering a spirit of pathfinding. \n\n![Napole\u00e3o at her directorial debut for The Lobbyists collective featured at the Chinook Series, for a piece called \"Threshold\". 2021. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagining-theatre\/screen-shot-2021-06-16-at-11_HJckE2.png)\n\nI\u2019m reimagining my artistic voice. I\u2019ve been moving towards directing, dramaturgy, advocacy and writing. As I challenge myself, I feed my creativity, which makes me a better artist, which enhances my ability to be of use, and the cycle continues. With a broader range of abilities, I have more to offer my colleagues, who reciprocate because they are on their own paths. Fostering meaningful growth in individuals can exponentially grow their ability to give back to a community. \n\nI\u2019m reimagining artistry on my terms. It\u2019s taken me years to unpack how I\u2019ve been conditioned away from the natural wonder, creativity, and curiosity that drives art. In expanding beyond my usual practice, I am finding my path. \n\nThis path necessitates supporting others along the way. As long as we have a shared space where we can meet and co-create, I think we will be ok. I will meet you there.\n\n*Cover image of Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\u2014photo credit: Brianne Jang (BB Photography) & April M. Killins*\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 12:47:57","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 11:16:57","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 10:56:37","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:41:10","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

重构社区和剧院的工作场所

文化日Natércia Napoleão

2021年6月29日

In terms of race and representation, opera has a long way to go still. Opera InReach mentors and featured performers are diverse, meaning students are sure to see themselves on stage.\n\nAlong with physical accessibility via digital delivery, the materials relate opera to the world students know, including social justice and other relevant themes, and forms like spoken word. Opera and social issues are not strangers. Beethoven's Fidelio tells the story of a woman who disguises herself as a jail guard to rescue her husband from incarceration in a political prison. Pepper, who was a pop singer before taking on opera, points out differences between pop and opera singing techniques. \n\nYet, pointing out the connections brings opera closer to home. \u201cThey\u2019re already experienced in \u2018opera\u2019 even if they don\u2019t know it,\u201d says Perri Lo, Provincial Coordinator for British Columbia.\n\n\u201cFor students, they don\u2019t quibble about what is opera or not,\u201d Fajardo adds.\n\nAnother important aspect is future audience building. \u201cThat was a big part of our considerations,\u201d Agostino says.\n\n![Libydo and Kayla Ruiz. Photo courtesy of Opera InReach.](assets\/National\/blog\/opera-inreach\/1-libydokaylaruiz-1_w39az4.png)\n \n**The Details**\n\nAfter offering pilot presentations at a mix of middle and high schools, and the University of Toronto (where both Adridge and Pepper studied), the teams are busy preparing modules to present to school boards at the coming of the academic year in September 2021. The material will be flexible.\n\n\u201cIt\u2019s being aware, being sensitive to their curriculum,\u201d Lo says. \u201cIt\u2019s so different between provinces.\u201d\n\n\u201cWe\u2019re trying to find as many different ways of approaching it,\u201d says Elliott Harder, Provincial Coordinator for Alberta. That can also include other disciplines such as literature, science (looking at the physics of sound, for example,) and theatre. \u201cIt\u2019s not just music,\u201d he says. \u201cWe keep finding more avenues to do that.\u201d\n\nThe presentations last between 7 and 20 minutes, with some examples, and wrap up in activity, typically with on-site mentors to provide support. Future plans include one-on-one mentorships for any students who want to pursue any aspect of opera from singing to stage management.\n\nAs Kehler points out, it\u2019s not only about arts and culture \u2013 but to educate students on realistic future employment opportunities. \u201cHow can we work in the opera industry, but maybe not on the opera stage?\u201d \n\nFeedback from the pilot programmes has been very positive, with many students enthusiastic about the opportunity to discover something they never would have gotten to otherwise. \u201cWe were so pleasantly surprised by the response,\u201d Agostino says. \n\nIn the end, opera is a glorious art form with a bad rep. \u201cOpera has a big job to undo that perception,\u201d Adridge says. \u201cIt\u2019s opera\u2019s job to do that.\u201d\n\nPutting opera in reach of everyone sets up the art form in its rightful place. \u201cArt as a pillar of society,\u201d Adridge says. \u201c\\[It\u2019s] the ultimate vessel of creativity.\u201d\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:54","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 12:15:48","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 11:50:05","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:50","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

重新校准:一看歌剧InReach

安雅·瓦森伯格,这里是文化日

2021年6月29日

As a Relaxed Performance Consultant, I help arts organizations to welcome members of the Disability Community to performances and spaces. And yes, a lot of the organizations I consult for are larger companies whose donors may have deeper pockets, but the people I work with aren\u2019t just ticking boxes - they want to make a real change in the arts scene in Canada. They want to re-imagine how to invite the Disability Community to participate in their work. \n\nI am often approached by smaller companies or individual artists asking how to make their work more inclusive, and honestly, small steps can be taken to begin that process. Steps that don\u2019t cost a lot, if anything at all. Erin told me that the Kingston Arts Council is \u201c\u2026making an effort to describe their photos (on social media)\u201d and, she shares, people are describing themselves in meetings. I agree. I\u2019ve noticed this myself over the last year. Prior to COVID the only meetings I attended where people gave visual descriptions of themselves (for members of the Blind and Low Vision communities) were those that were disability led. Now, it\u2019s more common\u2014at least in the arts. Emily Maxwell, Founder & Co-Director of Toronto\u2019s [The Disability Collective](https:\/\/www.thedisabilitycollective.com\/), echoes these thoughts. \u201cIt can sound like a lot and daunting, but small steps can be made until it becomes natural\u201d.\n\nIt\u2019s true, and something I always tell the people I work with. Start small, do what you can, but at the same time be honest with your community about what you are able to offer as well as what you aren\u2019t. So if you can keep the house lights at 30% and lower sound cues to 90 decibels, but can\u2019t afford an ASL\/LSQ interpreter or Audio Description, tell your audiences. Manage their expectations so that they know exactly what they can access and what they can\u2019t. Give them all the information they need prior to purchasing a ticket so that they can fully engage and participate, or know that your limitations won\u2019t allow that at this time.\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts\/f18a463c-2ef7-4e82-91ed-b29c8efcb091-original-min_ie6858.jpg)\nImage Description: Emily and Nathan are standing in a green field surrounded by grass and trees. They are leaning forward against a chain link fence and looking over the fence towards the left of the photo. Emily, a young white woman with red hair and blue eyes, is standing on the left of the photo with her arms on top of the fence. Nathan, a young white man with brown hair and blue eyes, is standing on the right of the photo with his left arm on top of the fence. They are both wearing blue denim jackets. Both have thoughtful expressions on their faces.\n\nDoes inclusion and accessibility stop at front of house? It shouldn\u2019t. What are we doing to \u201cshowcase human beings in all of their diverse beauty\u201d\u2014 a gorgeous thought by Nathan Sartore, Co-Director of The Disability Collective, a new company out of Toronto that promotes and showcases art by Disabled Artists. Art should \u201clook like what people look like\u201d, Nathan expands. \u201cAnd real people backstage too,\u201d Emily adds. Yes! As a former Stage Manager with on-again off-again mobility issues, I completely agree. How often have I arrived at a venue to find the booth inaccessible? More times than I\u2019d like to admit. And what about stage steps? How do artists who use mobility devices access a stage that doesn\u2019t have an elevator or ramp? Laura Cusack, Founder and Executive Director of the [Hummingbird Hub](https:\/\/www.hummingbirdhub.org\/) in downtown, historical Stouffville, found a way. \u201cCulture is the heart of a community. To get a community to bond, and make an impact as we grow we need to focus on the cultural arts\u201d. And that focus is brought about by their Accessible Open Mic Night. Most open mics, as we know, take place in pubs and bars that usually have stairs or aren\u2019t very inclusive. So how did a community centre in a century-old building become the centre for inclusivity in Stouffville? By engaging with their audience and community\u2014a thought echoed by each of the people I spoke with.\n\n> Ask your community what they need in order to participate. Engage in dialogue with the Disability Community and listen, without preconceived ideas, but with an open heart and mind, and a desire to breakdown barriers and include everyone. \n\n[Cassie-Hope Aubin](https:\/\/www.cassiehopeaubin.com\/), Deaf Theatre Artist, shares \u201cWe see diversity happening, which is amazing, but disability is often excluded or the at the bottom of the list.\u201d As a musical theatre performer Cassie-Hope has \u201cbeen in shows that weren\u2019t accessible, so I wouldn\u2019t have even been able to see my own show.\u201d\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts\/page-3-image-3_fvRC7l.png)\nImage Description: Taylor, a singer-songwriter in a wheelchair, wears a white t-shirt and performs at the Hummingbird Hub\u2019s Accessible Open Mic Night. A microphone on a black stand is in front of Taylor. His father, Mike, is on the right of the photo holding a guitar and wearing a green and white baseball-style shirt. A green and gold sign with \u201cHummingbird Hub\u201d and the web address is on a white wall behind them.\n\nIt\u2019s time for a change. Time to reimagine how we present, access, and create art. It\u2019s time to relax not only performances, but also processes. Reach out to the d\/Deaf and Disability communities, ask what they need to be included both onstage and off, engage disabled creatives, bring their voices to the stage and share their stories in open and honest ways. This is an exciting time of reflection. We are being allowed time to think about how we want to move forward\u2014and it\u2019s time to include every voice in that discussion.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:13","first_published_at":"2021-06-23 11:06:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 13:19:19","updated_at":"2021-07-28 10:40:28","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

重新想象——残疾人社区如何接触艺术

瑞秋纪念文化日

2021年6月29日

We're introducing sports people to theatre, and theatre people to sports\u2014and then there's people like us, who are in between, who can understand both worlds and love it.\n\nOn a summer night in 2008, at the corner of Queens Quay West and Bathurst in Toronto, six figures meet to play basketball. It's a weekly tradition: every Monday night at 10 pm, they meet here and shoot hoops until the lights at the court go out. The instigator was Richard Lee, who sent an email to fellow actors with an offer of a weekly game, held on Mondays\u2014the night the theatre is dark. Now, 12 years later, the tradition lives on through an innovative stage production: [_Monday Nights_](https:\/\/6thmancollective.wordpress.com\/).\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-1-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_7ZKtvW.jpeg)\n\n_Monday Nights_ was developed as part of the [Theatre Centre Residency Program](http:\/\/theatrecentre.org\/?p=1322) and saw its world premiere in Toronto in 2014, with subsequent runs in 2015 (to coincide with Toronto hosting the Pan American Games), 2017 and 2019. Most recently, it was mounted in New Westminster, BC, as part of the 2020 [PuSh International Performing Arts Festival](https:\/\/pushfestival.ca\/).\n\n\"As you grow up, you stop playing and you do adult things. You're working, you're paying bills, you're starting a career, you're trying to find love,\" says Byron Abalos. He and the other members of the [6th Man Collective](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/pg\/6thmancollective\/posts\/?ref=page_internal)\u2014veterans of the Monday night games\u2014hoped to put that conundrum to bed by adapting their weekly tradition to the stage.\n\nWhat does a pick-up basketball game look like as a piece of theatre? Upon entering the theatre, retrofitted into a makeshift basketball court, audience members are instructed by a \"referee\" (a performer in the production who acts as a guide of sorts) to choose from among the four sports bags. Each bag represents a \"team captain,\" whose journey they'll follow through the rest of _Monday Nights_. For the first half of the show, they listen to audio on headsets about their captain's personal story, as the performers run through basketball drills to teach them the rules of the game. Each captain's story is autobiographical, based on the performers in the collective; Abalos's story reflects his and his wife's attempts to conceive a child via in-vitro fertilization, for example.\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-4-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_uygO2V.jpeg)\n\nAround half-time, audience members join performers for a game of three-on-three. The stakes are unspeakably high: \"The captain of the team with the fewest points has to do the laundry of the other captains,\" after the show, Abalos admits. The show ends with performers and audience members continuing the Monday night tradition: sinking baskets until the lights go out.\n\n\"It's a journey from individual to community,\" Abalos explains. Audience members start as individuals, before coming together as competing teams, before ultimately forming a larger group. This unification is evident in the disparate audience members who come out to experience _Monday Nights_. \"It's often people who are not sports people, who hated gym in high school, who leave saying, 'Wow, that moved me and I understand sport in a different way than I did before.'\"\n\nSimilarly, he says, the show has attracted athletes who aren't necessarily predisposed to a night at the theatre. \"We had a father who brought his son, a teenager. This was the first piece of theatre they'd ever seen. There's something about the appeal of the sports part of it that made them curious enough to come on down. We're introducing sports people to theatre, and theatre people to sports\u2014and then there's people like us, who are in between, who can understand both worlds and love it.\"\n\n![2020 PuSh Festival, Anvil Centre, New Westminster, BC. Sarah Race Photography.](assets\/National\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out\/monday-nights-2-credit-sarah-race-photography-1_6mvl9d.jpeg)\n\nWhat are the commonalities between art and sport that makes the fusion so uplifting? \"Camaraderie, being in our bodies, competition, a chance to connect with each other as people,\" Abalos says. \"\\[Both art and sport] connect us to each other and help us to put ourselves in situations, to build empathy, to create community and to leave us better.\"\n\n_Monday Nights_ recently finished its West Coast dates, and life is back to normal. The sporting spirit remains high in Toronto with the Raptors as sitting NBA champs. Byron and his wife dote on their baby, now seven months old. And, 12 years later, the Monday night gang still gets together to play basketball. The only difference? \"We play on Saturday mornings\u2026 because we're all older and it works better for our schedules.\"\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-03-12 15:41:01","first_published_at":"2020-03-11 09:46:22","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-03-05 13:35:20","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:24:11","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

直到灯灭

“文化日”的泰勒·巴索

2020年3月12日,

通过艺术建立心理健康

利亚凉鞋

2019年3月19日

出现

伊莱Bizovie

2018年8月27日,