Culture365博客

移情机器?:探索沉浸式艺术技术、情感和政治行动之间的关系

Jozef Spiteri和Sunita Nigam文化日

2021年9月9日

通过创造力和协作重新连接社区

马洛里Gemmel

2021年9月8日

In times of uncertainty, art can be a steadying force. When we marvel at something, whether it is a painting, a turn of phrase or a piece of music, we\u2019re reminded of the human capacity to create and endure. (Chaves, 2020, para. 5).\n\nNow, more than fifteen months since the World Health Organization officially labeled the outbreak a pandemic, the arts sector has landed on its feet. As creative industries continue to reinvent and reshape the ways people interact with art in virtual contexts, artists around the world are boldly pushing the envelope in terms of impact. As we inch closer to post-pandemic normalcy, creative industries are playing an increasingly significant role in the advancement of sustainable practices and perspectives. To an unprecedented extent, government agencies, NGOs, and other powerful actors are demonstrating strong commitment to artists and the merits of their respective creative practices. _And for what cause?_ Artists wield not only tremendous capacity to inspire sustainable development\u2014but also to imagine, innovate, and create bright and healthy futures.\n\nAdmittedly, the term _sustainable development_ is both clunky and non-specific in meaning. A concept that transcends disciplinary boundaries, _sustainability_ is perhaps best summarized as unified and disciplined commitment to _both_ present and future populations. In short: how can we adequately satisfy the needs of people today without sacrificing the needs of future generations? Representing a fifteen-year blueprint for collaborative action, [the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)](https:\/\/www.undp.org\/sustainable-development-goals?utm_source=EN&utm_medium=GSR&utm_content=US_UNDP_PaidSearch_Brand_English&utm_campaign=CENTRAL&c_src=CENTRAL&c_src2=GSR&gclid=Cj0KCQjw0K-HBhDDARIsAFJ6UGhcuA87im4evf_9QOFn738updhF4ydFiCp5OHdlQmQRpGfWnCV2zZ8aAuP7EALw_wcB) refer to a series of science-based objectives with a deadline of 2030. [The seventeen ambitious goals](https:\/\/sdgs.un.org\/goals)\u2014which range from climate action to the reduction of inequalities\u2014demonstrate an international commitment to three sustainability pillars: _environmental, economic,_ and _social_.\n\n![United Nations HQ. Analog \/ digital collage. Ryan Elliot Drew.](assets\/National\/blog\/reorchestrating-our-future\/culturedays-image-3-a_RnnNXf.jpg)\n\nExploring contested terrain between art(ists) and sustainability, Canadian arts-researcher Dr. David Maggs describes three ways that artists uniquely advance sustainability trajectories. The first, which he refers to as _greening the sector_, involves \u201ccarbon accounting associated with artistic activity\u201d and the deliberate eco-conscious retooling of personal and industry mechanisms connected to the environment (Maggs, 2020). From the recycling of theatrical props and costumes to the cutback of air travel involved in artist tour planning, effective greening of the creative sector requires intuitive and innovative thinking across a multitude of artistic disciplines. Beyond environmental considerations, this model of artist-led _recognition_ and _mitigation of adverse impact_ can be aptly applied within economic and social contexts as well. Regardless of artistic medium, the fruit of impassioned creativity often conveys abstract messaging that _can_ have tangible and measurable impact on society. \n\nFor the creative sector to truly harness the unifying and transformative power of creative practitioners, it is essential that theatre halls, concert venues, galleries, record labels, festival planning committees, and other leading arts entities develop informed sensitivity to the cultural impacts of presented work. For example: might certain creation or dissemination processes directly or indirectly perpetuate racial, gender-based, or socio-economic divides? Furthermore, how might the thematic content or perceived aesthetic character of a given work impact marginalized communities? Just as creative industries can advocate for progressive environmental policies, conscious effort can _also_ be made to address social and economic injustices.\n\nThe second way that artists advance sustainability is through the aestheticizing of known scientific information. Built upon the notion that media consumers lack adequate environmental knowledge and\/or key perspectives, the artist might _raise the profile_ of select issues through the crafting of artistic communications. For example: National Geographic has brought considerable awareness to melting glaciers through photography of disrupted northern wildlife. Likewise, demonstrating projected coastline erosion within Atlantic Canada, artist Rilla Marshall debuted an installation in 2014 that illuminated Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island\u2019s imminent loss of land to the ocean. Featuring a series of intricately placed pegs along the shore, onlookers were exposed to future realities incompatible with their points of observation\u2014land soon to disappear beneath the waves (Murchie, para. 9).\n\nThirdly, Maggs articulates his vision of artists as conceptual engineers. Beyond simply advocating for awareness of sustainability principles, artists can act as innovators and leaders of positive change. Speaking to environmental concerns, what Maggs refers to as _reauthoring the world_ involves:\n\n> turning to art to explore meanings, identities, and purposes beyond carbon economies. Here, the goal is not to inspire and support climate art that carries \u201cthe message\u201d to diverse communities, but to embolden communities to find their own climate visions through the aesthetic. (Maggs, 2020).\n\nIntimately connected to respective creative processes, there remains a great deal to be learned from the ways that artists engage with and resolve internally-defined problems. No doubt, environmental, economic, and social pillars of sustainability require creative solutions to complex and ever-evolving issues.\n\n![Teatro Monumental. Analog \/ digital collage. Ryan Elliot Drew.](assets\/National\/blog\/reorchestrating-our-future\/culturedays-image-1-a_CUwAdL.jpg){.pull}\n\nA jarring disruption to creative industries across the globe, COVID-19 has presented a tremendous opportunity for artists to reorchestrate the future. Members of the RTVE Symphony Orchestra have since returned to the Teatro Monumental. Museums, libraries, and art galleries are welcoming communities back into shared spaces. And, while many share an insatiable yearning for pre-pandemic comfort and to reclaim what feels like a year of lost time and experience, modern science shows that a bright and healthy 2030 is _only_ possible through collective, urgent, and informed action. Pioneers of the imagination, the artist\u2019s intimate familiarity with creative processes appropriately reflects their capacity to engineer pathways forward. There are very good reasons why the United Nations has designated 2021 the International Year of Creative Economy for Sustainable Development. In designing the post-pandemic world, creative people are among our greatest assets.\n\n\n\n\nChaves, A. (2020, March 17). In times of crisis, we still need to turn to the arts. The National News. \nhttps:\/\/www.thenationalnews.com\/arts-culture\/comment\/in-times-of-crisis-we-still-need-to-turn-to-the-arts-1.993920\n\nMaggs, D. (2020, July 20). Art, after virus: Seven questions for a sector on the edge. The Philanthropist \nJournal. https:\/\/thephilanthropist.ca\/2020\/07\/art-after-virus-seven-questions-for-a-sector-on-the-edge\/\n\nMurchie, J. (2014, October 27). A Walk Through Charlottetown\u2019s Art in the Open 2014. Visual Arts News. \nhttps:\/\/visualartsnews.ca\/2014\/10\/a-walk-through-charlottetowns-art-in-the-open-2014\/ \n\n_I dedicate this short article to those who would accompany me to the Teatro Monumental: Anna, Jessica, Ryan, and Taya. We learned many valuable lessons during our symphony excursion._\n\n_I would like to acknowledge that this short article was researched and written on the traditional and unceded territory of the Mi'kmaq people._\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt\n- [RE:DEFINING Normal: A Prescription for a Canadian Cultural Landscape in Recovery](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/redefining-normal) by Valerie Sing Turner","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-08-09 15:23:21","first_published_at":"2021-08-09 15:23:21","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-14 10:20:24","updated_at":"2021-08-24 16:14:28","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

RE:规划我们的未来:通过艺术促进可持续发展

文化日的瑞安·艾略特·德鲁

2021年8月9日

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt\n- [RE:ORCHESTRATING Our Future: Advancing Sustainable Development Through The Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reorchestrating-our-future) by Ryan Elliot Drew\n- [RE:DEFINING Normal: A Prescription for a Canadian Cultural Landscape in Recovery](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/redefining-normal) by Valerie Sing Turner","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-07-13 09:06:59","first_published_at":"2021-07-12 16:14:42","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-07-12 16:00:19","updated_at":"2021-09-07 10:57:01","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":"2021-09-07 10:57:01","is_featured":true,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

Helm Studios改变了以盈利为目的的音乐模式,赋予艺术家权力

“文化日”的Aly Laube

2021年7月13日

In terms of race and representation, opera has a long way to go still. Opera InReach mentors and featured performers are diverse, meaning students are sure to see themselves on stage.\n\nAlong with physical accessibility via digital delivery, the materials relate opera to the world students know, including social justice and other relevant themes, and forms like spoken word. Opera and social issues are not strangers. Beethoven's Fidelio tells the story of a woman who disguises herself as a jail guard to rescue her husband from incarceration in a political prison. Pepper, who was a pop singer before taking on opera, points out differences between pop and opera singing techniques. \n\nYet, pointing out the connections brings opera closer to home. \u201cThey\u2019re already experienced in \u2018opera\u2019 even if they don\u2019t know it,\u201d says Perri Lo, Provincial Coordinator for British Columbia.\n\n\u201cFor students, they don\u2019t quibble about what is opera or not,\u201d Fajardo adds.\n\nAnother important aspect is future audience building. \u201cThat was a big part of our considerations,\u201d Agostino says.\n\n![Libydo and Kayla Ruiz. Photo courtesy of Opera InReach.](assets\/National\/blog\/opera-inreach\/1-libydokaylaruiz-1_w39az4.png)\n \n**The Details**\n\nAfter offering pilot presentations at a mix of middle and high schools, and the University of Toronto (where both Adridge and Pepper studied), the teams are busy preparing modules to present to school boards at the coming of the academic year in September 2021. The material will be flexible.\n\n\u201cIt\u2019s being aware, being sensitive to their curriculum,\u201d Lo says. \u201cIt\u2019s so different between provinces.\u201d\n\n\u201cWe\u2019re trying to find as many different ways of approaching it,\u201d says Elliott Harder, Provincial Coordinator for Alberta. That can also include other disciplines such as literature, science (looking at the physics of sound, for example,) and theatre. \u201cIt\u2019s not just music,\u201d he says. \u201cWe keep finding more avenues to do that.\u201d\n\nThe presentations last between 7 and 20 minutes, with some examples, and wrap up in activity, typically with on-site mentors to provide support. Future plans include one-on-one mentorships for any students who want to pursue any aspect of opera from singing to stage management.\n\nAs Kehler points out, it\u2019s not only about arts and culture \u2013 but to educate students on realistic future employment opportunities. \u201cHow can we work in the opera industry, but maybe not on the opera stage?\u201d \n\nFeedback from the pilot programmes has been very positive, with many students enthusiastic about the opportunity to discover something they never would have gotten to otherwise. \u201cWe were so pleasantly surprised by the response,\u201d Agostino says. \n\nIn the end, opera is a glorious art form with a bad rep. \u201cOpera has a big job to undo that perception,\u201d Adridge says. \u201cIt\u2019s opera\u2019s job to do that.\u201d\n\nPutting opera in reach of everyone sets up the art form in its rightful place. \u201cArt as a pillar of society,\u201d Adridge says. \u201c\\[It\u2019s] the ultimate vessel of creativity.\u201d\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt\n- [RE:ORCHESTRATING Our Future: Advancing Sustainable Development Through The Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reorchestrating-our-future) by Ryan Elliot Drew\n- [RE:DEFINING Normal: A Prescription for a Canadian Cultural Landscape in Recovery](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/redefining-normal) by Valerie Sing Turner","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:39:54","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 12:15:48","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 11:50:05","updated_at":"2021-08-24 16:11:51","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

重新校准:一看歌剧InReach

安雅·瓦森伯格,这里是文化日

2021年6月29日

沟通世代:师徒关系的价值-第二部分

克里斯汀劳森

2019年8月16日

音乐来抚慰

奥布里•里夫斯

2019年7月10日,

通过艺术建立心理健康

利亚凉鞋

2019年3月19日

当艺术是最好的良药

利亚凉鞋

2019年2月5日

假日事务:面向企业观众的节目

香农Litzenberger

2013年12月12日

作为艺术家的观众:为当代公众改造艺术体验

香农Litzenberger

2013年10月26日