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重新想象——残疾人社区如何接触艺术

瑞秋纪念文化日

2021年6月29日

RE:GENERATE: A Journey of Creative Resilience

马洛里Gemmel

2021年9月20日

艺术junktion在温尼伯,MB

文化的日子

2021年9月16日

\n\nDirector and Curator at Salmon Arm Arts Centre and Art Gallery, Tracey Kutschker has 20 years of experience in a management role in the arts and culture sector.Prior to partnering with BC Culture Days\u2019 RE:GENERATE series, the Salmon Arm Arts Centre was already offering support to artists, encouraging the creation of digital media. The Song Sparrow Hall in Salmon Arm is a unique space that provides facilities and resources for digital production offering equipment for taping video and audio and acoustic event space for music performance. RE:GENERATE helped to amp up and enrich Salmon Arm\u2019s creative initiatives and digital projects. \n\n![Louis Lucas in Salmon Arm's Marie Manson Arts Award + Sound Machines exhibition = Virtual Artist Residency.](assets\/BC\/louis-lucasart_sut2Op.jpg)\n\nTracey describes:\n\n\u201cIn Salmon Arm, we really punch above our weight in terms of the presentation of cultural activities. When the pandemic shut down live arts events, we all went straight to work creating digital content to keep our collective brains working and inspired. This RE:GENERATE series allowed the arts leaders to reconnect after a long year of isolation and just keeping our organizations afloat. We guided each other as we storyboarded our ideas, and we each reached out to integral supporters and founders to add to our videos. ![Colin James Main Stage Photo by Craig Pulsifer. Featured in Salmon Arm Roots and Blues - Altered States II.](assets\/BC\/colin-james-main-stage-photo-by-craig-pulsifer_a0r0Lg.jpg){.small.right} \n\nWe dug deep into the purposes of our events to extract what we think makes Salmon Arm special, and from that these five products help shine a light on the community\u2019s creativity and resiliency. The creation of digital content is now ubiquitous among arts non-profits, so the challenge wasn\u2019t how to manifest these videos, it was more how to show the true behind-the-scenes antics that most arts organizations are up to as we plan and execute events. Approaching this series with that lens made us recognize and value our own work, which tends to go unnoticed.\u201d \n\nPresident of the Prince Rupert Community Arts Council, Sandra Jones, says that in working on the RE:GENERATE series, \u201cWe discovered that there continues to be much going on in the arts and culture space in Prince Rupert, despite the challenges of the pandemic.\u201d \n\n![Russell Mather in Prince Rupert's Truth and Reconciliation Pole.](assets\/BC\/russel-mathers-totem_wVEdaC.png)\n\nCreating videos for RE:GENERATE helped to foster and renourish relationships among people in the Prince Rupert community. Sandra explains:\n\n\u201cPeople were invited to examine what they did during the Covid-19 Pandemic and found that the process actually clarified that they had done a lot more work than they imagined. They went into the process believing that they had been stalled and upon reflection realized that they had accomplished a great deal - often in ways that were new and unusual for them. People found that the process helped them to engage with others in their organization (if they had one) and also with the videographer.\u201d\n\n\n![Prince Rupert's The Treble with Covid.](assets\/BC\/music-still_ywHC2X.png){.pull.right} In addition to screening the 5 films created by and about Prince Rupert, Prince Rupert Community Arts Council is hosting an in-person film festival at the Lester Centre for the Arts that will showcase various other community-based films. \u201cWhen we screen the series of videos we have created, we imagine that even more great connections will be nourished between artists and cultural leaders as well as within the community at large,\u201d says Sandra. \n\n![Spuct Totem Pole featured in Bella Coola's Totem Carving.](assets\/BC\/screen-shot-2021-09-17-at-9_8c1R8c.png)\n\nBC Culture days extends our greatest thanks to each community who took part in creating the RE:GENERATE Series. Please join us as we celebrate and learn about the rich cultural sectors of these communities by tuning in every Friday for new video premieres. \n\n\n![Mark Locki in Kimberely During the Pandemic.](assets\/BC\/screen-shot-2021-09-17-at-10_TPMO3A.png)\n\n\n\n\n\n\n**RE:GENERATE Prince Rupert premieres Friday Sept 24, 2021** \n\n[Watch here.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/hubs\/552ace65-b1b6-495f-8513-114cef82375f)\n\n_Presented in partnership with the Prince Rupert Community Arts Council._\n\n**RE:GENERATE Bella Coola premieres Friday Oct 1, 2021**\n\n[Watch here.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/hubs\/a179ac55-f8c0-4622-afd8-fe8871f72534) \n\n_Presented in partnership with the Bella Coola Music Festival, Williams Lake and District Credit Union, and Bella Coola Community Forest._\n\n\n**RE:GENERATE Sooke premieres Friday Oct 8, 2021**\n\n[Watch here.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/hubs\/0528c230-6acd-4bf2-9cb8-f8cd9cf946db) \n\n_Presented in partnership with the Sooke Arts Council and Odlum Brown Limited._\n\n\n**RE:GENERATE Salmon Arm premieres Friday Oct 15, 2021**\n\n[Watch here.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/hubs\/a179ac55-f8c0-4622-afd8-fe8871f72534)\n\n_Presented in partnership with the Salmon Arm Arts Centre and Shuswap Tourism._\n\n\n**RE:GENERATE Kimberley premieres Friday Oct 22, 2021**\n\n[Watch here.](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/hubs\/c397da82-2c17-4816-95c5-3fca1d92ec3a) \n\n_Presented in partnership with Kimberley Arts at Centre 64._\n\n\n![RE:GENERATE Series Trailer.](assets\/BC\/screen-shot-2021-09-17-at-9_LIEdEQ.png)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-09-20 09:04:07","first_published_at":"2021-09-20 09:04:07","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-09-17 14:14:12","updated_at":"2021-09-20 15:29:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

RE:GENERATE: A Journey of Creative Resilience

马洛里Gemmel

2021年9月20日

I was taking care of my neighbours instead of the audience, and I was looking out for their budget instead of their evening of entertainment. But, it felt good. I told myself that like doing a show, any day where I promptly answered our property manager\u2019s emails was a good day.\n\nThe Board was a start, but it hardly covered the time I normally spent working on my in-town shows, let alone being on the road. I still faced a lot of days where I couldn't conceive of a reason to exist in the world. I also needed to replace the money I wasn't getting from performing.\n\nSo, I started selling Pok\u00e9mon.\n\nThanks to news-worthy current events such as COVID-19 and civil unrest, you probably missed the story about Pok\u00e9mon cards. I heard, by fluke, how the trend of \u201cripping\u201d (opening) packs on one's Livestream was sending the value of particular sets parabolic. I won't bore you with (or reveal) the details of how I identified a bulk, legal, supply of those sets, but I will tell you that I knew if I sold at market value I stood to double my money. However, it could take up to $10,000 to corner the market\u2014a market some might argue was roughly as solid as dogecoin.\n\nI shrugged and said, \u201cYou gotta catch 'em all.\u201d\n\nIt was a gamble, but with demand outpacing supply, all it took was some Kijiji and Facebook Marketplace ads to become the Walter White of Pok\u00e9mon in my city. In a time when collectors struggled to find 5-packs at retail, I'd show up to sales with Ziploc baggies filled with hundreds of cards at reasonable prices. Their eyes bulged, as if I actually held pocket monsters with elemental powers in my hands. By my third week selling I met a customer who already knew me by reputation.\n\n\u201cYou sold to Tony's crew didn't you?\u201d he said, his eyes locked onto the $500 of product I was unloading onto his centre console. \u201cI knew it, man... because when I saw those Ziploc baggies... I thought, 'this is the guy'...\u201d I'd become Heisenberg, the man with the Blue Ziplocs.\n\nIt took work; negotiating and selling the packs, sometimes $20 at a time, sometimes $2,500. It took three months of hustling only to reach break-even. I didn't mind. To quote Bryan Cranston's character: I liked it. I was good at it. Ringing the bell at the Pok\u00e9mon-sales office felt almost as good as doing a set. Ok, it didn't feel nearly as \u201cgood\u201d, but it did feel as \u201cpurposeful\u201d. The hustle to find enough stage time is the same that got me out of bed at 6:00 am to drive across the city to close a huge sale (I learned quickly that you meet when the customer wants to, otherwise they might come to their senses).\n\nPre-COVID, I ran a regular show at the same address since April 2010. I'm the second longest-running stand-up show and host in Canada (the first being Calgary's Comedy Mondays started by legendary James Moore). In 2018, I started bringing in headliners to do the room and expanded from Thursday nights to weekend shows.\n\nIt was something I took on spontaneously, but it started me on a path. Most comics hate producing or are bad at it (often both). I knew I'd rather run my own show, the way I thought it should be run, than wait around for someone to offer me stage time at a strip club at 5:00 pm (actually not the worst gig I did early on). I'd show up early every week to set up the room which was normally configured for music; moving 52 chairs, 12 tables, lighting candles and setting the lights to get the right ambience. I'd give my all to warming up the crowd at the start of every show, and after acts sometimes bombed. The comedy gods rewarded me with full audiences that appreciated the comedy club feel.\n\nThanks to producing my own show, I was very privileged to have an outlet where I could always invest my time and feel like I had a purpose. The downside of getting to focus only on comedy for the last decade is I only ever focused on comedy.\n\nBetween March 2020 and March 2021, I realized I don't have a purpose; one thing I'm meant to do. I choose a new purpose every day\u2014a goal or action I\u2019m going to make happen through deliberate, purposeful effort. Ideally that purpose is getting in front of crowds, but it doesn't have to be. I'm a great Board member. I like making things happen and looking out for the interest of the group. And, I like finding an angle and hustling as I did with the Pok\u00e9mon. \n\n![Green performing stand-up on stage. Photo courtesy of the author.](assets\/National\/blog\/repurpose\/mike-chucks2-1_qaROg4.jpg)\n\nWhen I get back to stand-up, I don't expect to stop doing either of those things. I see the opportunity to bring all these skills together: I want to run stand-up classes and workshops on how to produce shows so I can help new comics in my city the same way I took on responsibility and cared for everyone in my building. \n\nThe Pok\u00e9mon hustle showed me what happens when I fully commit, and made me think about the way I was approaching comedy. I was often going half way; bringing in a headliner for 2 nights of shows instead of 5, or occasionally posting short clips instead of consistently producing regular online content. If I can bet on myself the same way I did when I cornered the market I'll be excited to see how my stand-up evolves (ideally from a Charmeleon to a Charizard).\n\nIf you're an artist who feels like you lost your identity because COVID-19 took away your ability to perform as you normally would, look at it as an opportunity to reimagine your craft and engage with your audience\u2014perhaps even a new crowd or community\u2014in a different way. You don't need to _serve one purpose_, but rather use everything you\u2019ve got and everything you do to _create on purpose_.\n\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [The Road Less Travelled: Three artists reimagine success and career](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/the-road-less-travelled) by Linh S. Nguy\u1ec5n\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt\n- [RE:ORCHESTRATING Our Future: Advancing Sustainable Development Through The Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reorchestrating-our-future) by Ryan Elliot Drew\n- [RE:DEFINING Normal: A Prescription for a Canadian Cultural Landscape in Recovery](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/redefining-normal) by Valerie Sing Turner","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-29 10:37:48","first_published_at":"2021-06-21 14:11:31","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-21 14:01:11","updated_at":"2021-08-24 16:11:15","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

再保险:目的

文化日的迈克·格林

2021年6月29日

\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a [special blog series](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/re-imagine-series) featuring writers and creatives from across Canada (and beyond!) with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2021 theme, RE:IMAGINE. Explore more stories below.**\n- [Arts in Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/arts-in-motion) by Aaron Rothermund.\n- [Reimagining Public Spaces: The Share-It-Square in Portland, Oregon](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-public-spaces) by Laura Puttkamer\n- [Refresh: How a Year on Instagram Redefined Artistic Communities](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/refresh-artistic-communities-on-instagram) by Eva Morrison\n- [RE:PURPOSE](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/repurpose) by Mike Green\n- [Recalibrating: A Look at Opera InReach](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/recalibrating-opera-inreach) by Anya Wassenberg\n- [Reimagine\u2014How the Disability Community Accesses the Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-how-disability-community-accesses-arts) by Rachel Marks\n- [Reimagining Community and the Workplace of Theatre](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagining-theatre) by Nat\u00e9rcia Napole\u00e3o\n- [Helm Studios flips the for-profit music model to empower artists](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reimagine-helm-studios) by Aly Laube\n- [Curating _INUA_, Canada\u2019s newest Inuit art exhibit](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/curating-inua) by Carolyn B. Heller\n- [When Less is More: What Theatre Can Learn From a Year in Slow Motion](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/when-less-is-more) by Megan Hunt\n- [RE:ORCHESTRATING Our Future: Advancing Sustainable Development Through The Arts](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/reorchestrating-our-future) by Ryan Elliot Drew\n- [RE:DEFINING Normal: A Prescription for a Canadian Cultural Landscape in Recovery](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/redefining-normal) by Valerie Sing Turner","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2021-06-14 11:45:17","first_published_at":"2021-06-14 11:37:32","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2021-06-14 11:28:11","updated_at":"2021-08-24 16:10:38","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

少走的路:三位艺术家重新想象成功和事业

文化日Linh S. Nguyễn

2021年6月14日

Step Into the Process (Part 3 of 5): Damian John

他玛Tabori

2020年10月5日

As the Coronavirus restrictions gradually settled over my life in mid-March and my regular book club was put on hiatus, I found myself craving an arts-focused connection...\n\nAs the minutes tick towards 7pm, my computer is perched precariously on a stack of books while pages of discussion prompts lie on the desk underneath a dog-eared copy of our May book choice. The Facebook video interface is poised for recording; all I have to do now is hit the \u2018Go Live\u2019 button to begin our meeting. The 7pm MST beginning is late for some of our members in eastern Canada, but the promise of a satisfying deconstruction of our latest read is enough to pull people back to their devices at this hour. Once I begin the recording there is little preamble, I pause only to thank people for joining before I jump right into the discussion. After the requisite 40 second delay in the video feed, comments begin pouring in: a whole month\u2019s worth of observations scrolling down the screen.\n\nThere are two different kinds of book clubs. The first is an informal gathering of friends, eager to indulge in some libations and friendly gossip with some limited book talk thrown in. The second is a formal club with a regular meeting time, specific book choices voted on in advance and a discussion focused solely on the chosen reading material. Quite often the latter is made up of strangers, brought together over a love of the written word and a desire to meet like-minded people. Now, while in-person gatherings are on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, attention is shifting to online groups as an accessible and efficient way of connecting those with similar interests.\n\n![Anne leading a discussion during an Ivereadthis Online Book Club meeting.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/img-1017-1_EkDI7C.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nAs the Coronavirus restrictions gradually settled over my life in mid-March and my regular book club was put on hiatus, I found myself craving an arts-focused connection. As a critic I\u2019m lucky enough to have books mailed directly to my home, so I invited fellow bookworms to join me in reading through my collection by starting the [Ivereadthis Online Book Club](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/groups\/ivereadthisonlinebookclub\/). The Club is a free and public Facebook group, connecting once a month over live video chats which allow for real-time discussion with an unlimited number of participants. As I write this our group includes over 200 members, but after only two meetings it is clear who will actively participate in our video chats and who is content to hover on the sidelines, popping in and out for book recommendations.\n\nFace-to-face interactions ensure a certain level of decorum is upheld while online discussions can easily devolve into bickering. As the group moderator I was mildly concerned that our conversations may become offensive, or worse, trolled by people looking to stir up pointless controversy. To avoid this, I decided our group would focus on works of fiction which allow people to voice opinions on issues external to their own lives, but relevant all the same. For example, character motivations are a frequent topic of discussion; why did someone act that way, were they justified in lashing out, what would you have done in the same situation? Criticizing the actions of a character tends to incite less controversy, keeping the tone of our discussions light and entertaining regardless of the dark subject matter the chosen books may address. \n\n![Photo courtesy of Vlada Karpovish.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/vlada-karpovich_5ex6dE.jpeg){.pull}\n\nDespite the ease of voicing one\u2019s thoughts to strangers across the country in sweatpants, there are obvious downsides to staying solely online. Fran Kimmel, a writer and book club veteran points out: \u201cwhen online I might not try quite as hard to get my point across or to understand other people\u2019s points. There\u2019s the added layer of technology separating you from others, and all those emotional intelligence cues we get through body language are stripped away. But I\u2019m also hopeful that this is a learned skill, and the more we meet online, the better we\u2019ll become at sharing deeply.\u201d \n\nThe only distinguishing factor of each group member is their thumbnail-sized picture, so there is a distinct lack of background information to base judgements on. If someone voices an opinion that you vehemently disagree with at an in-person meeting, you are likely to fall back on their body language and tone of voice to help justify their comment. Online we can only go by a person\u2019s text-based contributions\u2014so although it seems easier to participate in a virtual chat, our words hold more weight than usual. Readers are especially aware of how important word choice can be, so thankfully our conversations have remained respectful and empathetic, even during disagreements. \n\nAs the organizer, my one question that looms above all others is the likelihood this club will continue. COVID-19 has not only shifted the way we currently interact with others, it has altered the way we imagine our future communications; the ease in which we have shifted our events online demonstrates this new way of meeting can continue even when moving restrictions have lifted. And even if the membership of the Ivereadthis Online Book Club slowly dwindles once life returns to normal, members now see the benefits to joining other public clubs like this in the future. One of the group\u2019s members, Jolena, confirms this newly discovered interest is one she\u2019ll continue with: \u201cI would join another book club, it was a great experience to be able to discuss a topic among peers.\u201d Knowing our members feel this way is incredibly validating\u2014the cultural richness of literature is a wonderful gift to share with others, especially with those you never would have met otherwise.\n\n![Photo courtesy of Parth Shah.](assets\/National\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction\/parth-shah_Kvywu1.jpeg){.overflow}\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of Unexpected Intersections. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Indigenous Storytelling x Digital Media: [_\u201cPeople are Finally Listening\u201d\u2013Indigenous Animation Rises Up_ by Chris Robinson](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/indigenous-animation-rises-up)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [Chinatown's Living Room: _The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-09-02 10:10:02","first_published_at":"2020-06-10 12:38:44","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-06-10 12:38:07","updated_at":"2020-09-02 10:10:02","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

陌生人和小说

文化日的安妮·洛根

2020年9月2日

It was so powerful to see our stories on screen for the first time. I\u2019ve great respect for the work that they put into the world and normalized it for us.\n>> \u2014 Terril Calder, influential M\u00e9tis artist and stop motion animator based in Toronto.\n\n\n\u201c_Wapos Bay_ certainly did have a large influence on our early work and our company's evolution,\u201d says Neil Christopher, one of the co-founders of the Inuit owned, Nunavut-based studio, [Taqqut Productions](https:\/\/taqqut.com\/). \u201cWe started developing a stop motion series called _Beyond the Inuksuk_ that never got picked up. This was our first big project and it was definitely inspired by _Wapos Bay_.\u201d\n\nIn 2009, again in collaboration with APTN, the NFB produced the series, _Vistas_, a collection of 13 films created by Indigenous artists\u2014including Diane Obomsawin, of Abenaki descent, who has since become a well-known and award-winning animator on the animation festival circuit\u2014from across Canada.\n\nIn 2019, the NFB\u2019s unique apprenticeship program, [Hothouse](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/playlist\/hothouse\/)\u2014that gives emerging animators a chance to make a short film in 12 weeks\u2014offered Indigenous creators from across the country an opportunity to create their own films. Chris Grant, a young Mi\u2019kmaq artist from the Pabineau First Nation whose mother, Phyllis, made two NFB animated shorts (_Maq and the Spirit of the Woods_, 2006; _Wasteg_, 2008) [was one of those participants](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/film\/xo-rad-magical\/). \n\n\u201cIt was an experience of growth for me,\u201d says Grant. \u201cI was going through personal issues because I never lived in a cool city, had money and fun work. It was extremely important for me as an artist because it boosted my credentials I guess for more work. It made me realize I am an animator and filmmaker at heart, and always have been. It was a beautiful fractal of growth for me.\u201d\n\n![Top: Amanda Strong, Glenn Gear. Bottom: Christopher Auchter, Terril Calder.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/20200406-153321_M3WJ2j.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nSince about 2009 or 2010, Indigenous animation in Canada has also emerged outside the doors of the NFB, led by artists such as Terril Calder, Glenn Gear, Amanda Strong, Christopher Auchter and Taqqut Productions.\n\nTaqqut Productions was founded in 2011 by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher. Their animation work, sometimes co-produced with the Montreal animation studio, [e\u2192d films](https:\/\/edfilms.net\/), includes a mix of TV (_Ananna\u2019s Tent_) and short films (e.g. [_Amaqqut Nunaat: The Country of Wolves_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/129589325), 2011; _Little Folk of the Arctic_, 2015; _Giant Bear_, 2018, _What\u2019s My Superpower_, 2019) made primarily for younger audiences. \n\n\u201cThe aim,\u201d says Flaherty, \u201cwas to tell our stories using the language of the population of Nunavut. Taqqut\u2019s part is to foremost tell stories coming from Inuit with authentic Inuit content, using the Inuit language. Inuktitut is being lost at 1% a year, and if we have animated films targeting children to retain the language, there must be more made.\u201d\n\nIn recent years, the studio has branched out beyond traditional Inuit stories. \u201cOur younger authors,\u201d adds Flaherty, \u201care now leading Taqqut with their vision to create film catering to all audiences. We have created other animations not just from oral stories, but also stories from our books. Not just with animation, but also with puppets.\u201d\n\n![Still from \"Snip\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/snip-by-terril-calder_ge0NM3.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nIn the realm of independent animation, Terril Calder has been an influential force since making her first stop motion films. Most of the work mentioned above has dealt with assorted myths\/folk tales. Calder\u2019s work is raw, unstable and haunting, tackling a number of personal and difficult issues like identity ([_Choke_](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=C0LE61KLdmg), 2010, co-created with Michelle Latimer; _Canned Meat_, 2009; _Vessel_, 2013), memory, isolation, and the unspeakable horrors of residential schools (_Snip_, 2016; _Keewaydah_, 2017).\n\nA Drawing major graduate of the Fine Arts program at the University of Manitoba, Calder came to animation through Winnipeg\u2019s [Video Pool Media Arts Centre](http:\/\/www.videopool.org\/). \u201cAnimation,\u201d says Calder, \u201cheld and holds so many possibilities to tell my stories and bring a different perspective to screen to make change. It really is the sum of all of my parts. Activism, Storytelling, Art, Painting, Sewing, Photography, Compositing\u2026it completely challenges me in every way.\u201d\n\nAfter completing his MFA in sculpture\/installation at Concordia, the Newfoundland born, Glenn Gear worked at a software development company in Montreal. \u201cI became increasingly curious and inspired by traditional animation techniques. I fell in love with cardboard cutout and silhouette animation, but also looked at many other stop-motion animation processes with physical puppets. I began reading, researching, talking with other animators, and most importantly experimenting with as many techniques as I could with a small camera and basic setup. Although I didn\u2019t have a formal education in animation, my background in photography and sculpture greatly helped me. The ability to create a whole world, brought to life frame-by-frame, was addictive and pure magic. I was hooked.\u201d\n\nDrawing on his Inuit and Newfoundland ancestry, Gear\u2019s films touch upon personal and collective histories (e.g. _Resettlement_, _Kablun\u00e2t_, [_Ikuma Siku_](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/68052651)), mixed with more poetic and playful stories (_Rosewood Casket_, _Ginkgo_, _Cry of the Loup-garou_) all with nature often in a central role. \n\n![Still from \"Kablun\u00e2t\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/kablunat-2_c8Gow0.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nChristopher Auchter grew up on the islands of Haida Gwaii, an archipelago off the Northern Pacific coast of Canada. He studied media at Vancouver\u2019s Emily Carr University of Art and Design and later graduated from Sheridan College\u2019s computer animation program. Auchter has worked in book illustration, animated for various TV series and video games, and has directed live action (_Now is the Time_, 2020) and animation shorts (notably the beautiful and award winning [_The Mountain of SGaana_](https:\/\/www.nfb.ca\/film\/mountain_of_sgaana\/), 2017, which told an old Haida fable).\n\nMichif artist Amanda Strong, whose animated shorts include the imaginative, haunting explorations of personal and collective ancestry, [_Four Faces of the Moon_](https:\/\/www.youtube.com\/watch?v=rWe--sysNkk), 2016 and _Biidaaban_, 2017) came to stop motion animation through Photo and Illustration studies at Sheridan College. \u201cIt gave me a basis to explore moving-image while using these tools to create worlds and make stories move. Stop motion really is a series of photos that sequenced together create a magical experience of movement that can\u2019t be replicated by software. It is beautiful to see that first shot move after years of making all the pieces and it sure is beautiful when the sonic and visual pieces unite. It\u2019s a powerful tool to tell stories.\u201d\n\n![Still from \"The Mountain of SGaana\", 2017.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/the-mountain-of-sgaana-001_BYca3y.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nThere are a variety of reasons for this recent rise in Indigenous-created animation films, some of which overlap with the general rise in animation production. Advancements in technology have made animation a more accessible and affordable process for many. There was a time when animators were taking anywhere from 2 to 5 to 10 years to complete a short film. Today, there are a number of animators making films annually (sometimes more than one). \n\n\u201cThe tools and processes to create animation are more accessible and cost less,\u201d agrees Glenn Gear. \u201cThere have been great strides made in the past 10 years in terms of software, especially on alternative platforms such as smartphones. Apps like Stop Motion Studio, Animation Desk, and RoughAnimator are low cost and offer a streamlined workflow for animation. You don't necessarily need a large studio with specialized equipment.\u201d\n\nSince the late 1990s, there has been a tsunami of animation programs and departments opening up across the world. To give the reader some context: I have been the Artistic Director of the [Ottawa International Animation Festival](http:\/\/www.animationfestival.ca\/) (OIAF) since the early 1990s. When I first started with the OIAF in 1991, there were 750 films submitted to the then biannual festival. Today, the OIAF receives in the range of 2,400 films (including features, VR, TV, student etc.) annually. \n\n![Still from \"Four Faces of the Moon\", 2016.](assets\/National\/blog\/indigenous-animation\/fourfaceofmoon_PjS2Mo.jpeg){.overflow}\n\nThe Simpsons (inspired by MTV and Sesame Street indirectly) showed producers and advertisers that animation could be profitable. This triggered an explosion in all avenues of animation and created a demand for talent. With the technological tools becoming more affordable, many educational institutions jumped on board to capitalize on the explosion\u2014and to train and educate a new generation of animators.\n\nIndigenous artists and youth have also benefited\u2014alongside increasing public awareness of the unjust and sometimes horrific manner that Indigenous people have been treated in Canada\u2014from these advancements. \u201cThere is more investment into teaching Indigenous youth and providing them with the digital tools alongside traditional knowledge and ways of working,\u201d says Gear. \n\n> As more and more Indigenous folks migrate towards city centers, there are more informal and formal networks of knowledge, resource, and skill sharing. There is still much to be done in this regard, but the institutions such as universities, colleges and government institutions are slowly changing to hopefully be more accountable and transparent to Indigenous folks.\n\n\"We now have access to new tools and platforms,\u201d adds Strong, whose Vancouver-based studio, [Spotted Fawn Productions](https:\/\/www.spottedfawnproductions.com\/), creates space for Indigenous artists in animation. It excites me to see more and more Indigenous people of all ages engaging with tools and technology to animate their stories. It\u2019s important that we lift each other up, celebrate our successes and always encourage other Indigenous storytellers to create.\"\n\n\"Our voices, cultures, and diverse stories are finally being heard by a larger public,\u201d adds Gear. \u201cWhen I asked filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin about the changes she has seen in the reception of Indigenous work in the past 10 years, she said, \u2018People are finally listening.\u2019\"\n\n\n\n**This article is part of a special blog series\u2014running March-September\u2014featuring writers and creatives from across Canada with stories that both highlight and celebrate Culture Days\u2019 2020 theme of _Unexpected Intersections_. Explore more intersections below:**\n\n- Theatre x Sport: [_Until the Lights Go Out_ by Taylor Basso](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/until-the-lights-go-out)\n- Academia x Creativity: [_Building 21: Make zines, not research papers_ by Greta Rainbow](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-21)\n- Poetry x (Natural) Environment: [_Listen to the River: An Ode to the Columbia River_ by Saba Dar](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/listen-to-the-river)\n- Teahouse x Activism: [_Chinatown\u2019s Living Room: The gathering place for a budding activist community_ by Anto Chan]( \/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/tea-base)\n- Traditional Craftsmanship x Youth Outreach: [_At the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, They Build More Than Boats_ by Aleen Leigh Stanton](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/building-boats-changing-lives)\n- Visual Arts x Science: [_What happens when you mix an artist, a scientist and a very bright light?_ by Vivian Orr](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/artist-scientist-light)\n- Book Clubs x Digital Landscapes: [_Strangers and Fiction_ by Anne Logan](\/\/www.statestpizza.com\/en\/blog\/strangers-and-fiction)","content_fr":null,"should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2020-04-14 10:41:05","first_published_at":"2020-04-06 15:01:12","deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2020-04-06 13:07:52","updated_at":"2020-09-29 15:25:00","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

“人们终于在倾听”——本土动画崛起

文化日Chris Robinson

2020年4月14日

概念与参与:对展览的反思

戴夫Dyment

2020年1月8日

BC省10年文化日回顾

克里斯汀劳森

2019年9月5日

投入时间-参与调查

戴夫Dyment

2019年8月22日

在BC激发创造力-第2部分

克里斯汀劳森

2019年7月18日

Maybe we need interventions. Maybe we need something to give us a moment to take a step to the side. Not a step back, just a step to the side. And just take a moment to pause and realign, and recalibrate, and redefine what matters.\n\n![Artist Kat Singer.](assets\/National\/blog\/a-step-to-the-side\/singer.jpg){.small}\nMultimedia artist, maker, activist and educator Kat Singer, who will be guiding attendees through the collaborative creation of sculptures from reclaimed materials, has found personal healing in similar work. \"My work helps me process whatever I am going through at the moment,\" explains Kat. \"As I build a figure, stitch by stitch, I contemplate the meanings behind my struggles, and honour my story. When a sculpture is complete, I often feel relieved, since I have a much better understanding of what I am dealing with.\" The sculptures Kat will be making with visitors at CD@L will take the form of trees, which, they explain, represent ideas of growth, resilience and adaptability \u2013 key components of wellness.\n\n![Textile sculpture. Photo courtesy of Kat Singer.](assets\/National\/blog\/a-step-to-the-side\/singer-textile-sculpture-detail.jpg)\n\nJaene F. Castrillon, whose work combines art and activism with spirituality, also has a personal story of finding improved well-being through art. \"My entire practice came into being in 2013 after bouts of chronic illness and pain rendered me disabled,\" Jaene explains. \"My art has become an adventure that celebrates the brilliance and heartbreak of living a life less ordinary \u2013 creating an alternative to harmful notions around wellness, illness and worthiness, honouring art as medicine by taking up space and digging into myself.\"\n\nAt CD@L, Jaene will offer a dreamcatcher workshop, where Indigenous elders will share their knowledge on the significance of the dreamcatcher while participants create their own. \"It is said by some that they let our good dreams through and diffuse our bad dreams so they don't return. A good night's sleep is [an] integral part of wellness,\" she explains. \n\n![Artist Jaene F. Castrillon, _A Celebration of Darkness_. Photo courtesy of Jaene F. Castrillon.](assets\/National\/blog\/a-step-to-the-side\/castrillion-a-celebration-of-darkness.png)\n\nWhile Jaene, Kat and Kanika are multidisciplinary artists with diverse approaches to their respective crafts, all agree on the fundamental nourishing essence of creativity. \"Creativity ought to be recognized for its crucial role in a healthy lifestyle, and given the time and space it deserves,\" says Kat. \"[Art] has been a source of joy and healing for me. When I share my art with others, I invite them to nourish what is already inside them: resilience, beauty, and joy.\"\n\nAnd what better place to undertake these activities of creativity and connection than the library, which, for Jaene, represented a childhood sanctuary against hardship and abuse: \"I feel that I survived my very bleak childhood because I could borrow books by authors like Charles Dickens, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Edgar Allan Poe. [\u2026] Libraries have been intrinsic to my survival and upbringing.\"\n\nKanika, who tries to reduce barriers in her artistic practice, values the library as a space of accessibility. \"In theory, it doesn't discriminate, [if] you're a newcomer to the city, you have special needs, whatever it may be. [\u2026] It's a public space that's welcoming to everyone, that fosters knowledge and growth.\"\n\nWith six artist-led programs taking place, there are ample opportunities for knowledge and growth, and to explore what Kanika calls \"the natural human urge\" of creativity. \n\n>So many people stop themselves, like, 'oh, I can't make art, I'm not good,' or whatever stories or inhibitions they have. That's why I'm excited to do a program like this for Culture Days, because it's really for everyone. And it doesn't matter if you think you're good or bad. What matters is if you're interested, you're curious, you wanna be creative, you wanna explore yourself, and you just wanna try something new.\n>> \u2013 Kanika Gupta\n \nOn September 27 and 28, try something new with Culture Days @ the Toronto Public Library.\n\n\n**Culture Days @ the Library is an initiative of Ontario Culture Days, curated by Meaghan Froh Metcalf, Outreach & Programs Manager, for it's ninth iteration in 2019.**\n\n**This Ontario Culture Days program is produced in partnership with [Toronto Public Library](https:\/\/www.torontopubliclibrary.ca\/). Ontario's @ the Library programming is made possible thanks to the support of the [Ontario Library Association](http:\/\/www.accessola.org\/web).**","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2019-07-17 12:00:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-07-10 11:25:39","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:59","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

向旁边一步:文化日@图书馆提供韧性、美丽和欢乐

泰勒低音部

2019年7月17日,

连接到颜色

奥布里•里夫斯

2019年7月17日,

音乐来抚慰

奥布里•里夫斯

2019年7月10日,

织一件,织一件,放松一点

奥布里•里夫斯

2019年7月3日,

\u201cCreate the highest vision possible for your life, because you become what you believe.\"\n>>-Oprah\n\n![](assets\/National\/blog\/artist-survival-guide\/mandy-2.jpg)\n\nYou must invest in your art, your child within, for what moves you ultimately moves others.\nThis life is a \u201cchoose your own adventure,\u201dso if you are not invested in your own journey, then you can become derailed rather quickly. Why not stay the course with what brings you delight and a healthy challenge? Finding your truth(s) as an artist, in whatever medium that may be, takes time or, for some, simply the acknowledgement that it exists within you to take up the reins and run with it. (Think back to the last time you saw a child or yourself as a child gleefully engulfed in an artistic, self-directed task for hours.) Check in with yourself and where you are at to see what honestly resonates with you today.\n\nFind your strength in community. Taking great strides in any direction takes conviction, but also a heck of a lot of support from within and externally from your people. Not everyone needs be like-minded. Contrary to popular belief, sometimes people with varying life experiences or different age groups and opinions can be the grit to solidify your resolve and really get focused or more dedicated to an aspect of yourself, your art, or your business. Be gentle with yourself \u2013 reinvention of oneself when transitioning to school, out of school, the workforce, within contracts, and everything else your life may offer up takes a village. Be sure to choose wisely as to whom you opt into your circle. Ask for help! Learn the power of yes and no!\n\nShare. This may sound downright simple, but I know full well that the perfectionist inside can thwart many possibilities of showcasing or sharing where you happen to be along in your process. Know that where you are at is simply that:s a mere snapshot in time. CONGRATS and way to go! This is your best for right now. Be confident in that. Take great pride. Try not to cut yourself off at the foot by holding yourself back from opportunities, grants, auditions, etc., for not being \u201cready yet.\u201d The marvellous actor Hugh Laurie has been quoted saying:\n\n_\u201cIt's a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you're ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.\u201d \u2015 Hugh Laurie_\n\nWouldn\u2019t you agree?\n\nThis whole notion of scarcity of time can stem from a sense of not doing your soul's work, your truth, honouring and owning that, sharing what authentically moves you with those you love and with steadfast and new audiences that you have yet to engage with, whom you will empower and move with your work. That being said, time can quicken when in the zone of channelling your talents and time, but the rewards somehow blend together to hold you to your higher power and elevate your resolve to invest in yourself, to move your feet, inspiration and career forward, and apply for the next opportunity that you deem fit for your own very personal evolution.\n\nI implore you to stick to your guns and get out there and take yourself on an artist date as often as you can! Try a new hobby, craft or art form, medium, class, or delve even deeper into your passion and madly pursue it. Why not? It\u2019s far better than the alternative.\n\nHope to see you at the Pop-Up event lunchtime 12-2 p.m. at Robson Square Wednesday, September 26th or out at the Culture Days Hub where I\u2019ll be your emcee Friday, September 28 from 2-7:30 p.m., then 7:30-8 p.m. I will perform \u201cMandy Rushton\u2019s Pop-Culture Cabaret and Sing-a-Long. I also take the stage Saturday, September 29, at the same time, 7:30 p.m.-8 p.m.\n\nNow get out there and do your thing, do it well, and don\u2019t give up on yourself, nor the pursuit of showing up authentically in your life. Live it out well!\n\n_**Mandy Rushton**, a born performer, raised in BC and currently based in Vancouver, is a multi-talented, triple threat. She is a dynamic character actor, having graced a multitude of stages, performing vaudeville in Dawson City, Yukon, musical theatre across Canada and the States, including the PNE and Canada's Wonderland, animation in Cancun, and hundreds of venues in between. You can catch her voice next in the upcoming feature film: CARGO where she had a blast voicing characters, keeping the director and producers in stitches. Mandy has used her skills to transform into a VIP hospitality entertainer. In years past she\u2019s served as an emcee\/singer\/host for corporate events, high profile charity galas\/product launches and special event\/fundraisers, raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for worthy causes. A highlight of her career was the opportunity to perform for the consulate of the Netherlands and 800+ Holocaust survivors at the first ever WWll conference in North York, Toronto. Mandy spellbinds the young and young at heart, sharing the magic of intimate stories with her audience. A bonafide torch singer and lover of The Great American Songbook, this balladeer has found time to produce and star in her own one-woman cabaret acts. There\u2019s no limit to what she can or will do next!_\n\n**Instagram:** [@msrushton101](https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/msrushton101\/) \n**Twitter: **[@mandy_rushton](https:\/\/twitter.com\/mandy_rushton) \n**Facebook:** [www.facebook.com\/MsRushton101 or Reverbnation.com\/mandyrushton](https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/MsRushton101\/) \n**Website:** [http:\/\/resumes.actorsaccess.com\/MandyRushton](http:\/\/resumes.actorsaccess.com\/MandyRushton) \n**YouTube:** [http:\/\/www.youtube.com\/c\/MandyRushton101](http:\/\/www.youtube.com\/c\/MandyRushton101) \n**Vimeo:** [https:\/\/vimeo.com\/mandyrushton](https:\/\/vimeo.com\/mandyrushton) \n**Linkedin:** [www.linkedin.com\/in\/mandyrushton](http:\/\/www.linkedin.com\/in\/mandyrushton)","content_fr":"","should_publish_at":null,"published_at":"2018-09-17 18:30:00","first_published_at":null,"deleted_at":null,"created_at":"2019-06-24 16:45:27","updated_at":"2019-10-04 18:02:58","thumbnail_file_id":null,"featured_at":null,"is_featured":false,"is_published":true,"should_publish":false,"status":"published"}" style="scroll-snap-align: start;">

艺术家的生存指南

曼迪拉什顿

2018年9月17日

惊人的相似之处——创意日和文化日之间的讨论

梅根·弗罗麦特卡尔夫

2018年8月24日

数量优势:艺术家运营中心的创意价值

猫勒布朗

2013年8月13日,